Wood epoxy??

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Wood epoxy??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 06:55 pm:

Has anyone tried any of these wood epoxy products that you can buy in home improvement stores to repair tack rails that are full of nail holes and kind of disintegrated in spots? It will most likely form a nice shape and all but will it take nails?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Saggese on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 07:12 pm:

You can use toothpicks and wood glue to fill the nail holes, then cut the toothpicks and sand them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 07:24 pm:

I've used epoxies for tack rails but you can't pound the nails in. Take a nail and cut off the head and then use it for a drill bit. Just be careful not to bore the nail hole out. Using the nail for drilling will give you the exact size hole for the nail without cracking the epoxy. Jus how's I do's it...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 08:47 pm:

I use West System epoxy with the thickening powder mixed in . You can mix it to be very thick, thicker than Bondo. The epoxy does not absorb water, so good for a long time. I also use it as a general purpose filler these days for the same reason.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 09:34 pm:

Doug, try Kwik Poly. I love it for things like you mention. It is a two part product that when mixed has the consistency of water. It soaks into the old wood very deeply and when it hardens, the wood has been turned into almost a fiberglass type of material. When mixed you have about 2 minutes to work, so plan your attack, ahead of time. When it "kicks" it does it in seconds. Its very similar to how Bondo acts as to working time. You can build dams with tape to help hold the Kwik Poly in place. Or for your tack strip project wrap three sides of it with tape leaving the worst side to use as the "pour" side. Mix small batches and do multiple pours as needed. Langs has it for sale in their catalog. One thing about the Kwik Poly is that it soaks very deep into the wood. Anything very thick is not going to help you on your tack strip nail holes. Kwik Poly soaked wood will accept the new nails very well. If you decide to give it a try, do a couple small test mixes to get a feel for what it can do. I think you will like it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eddy Lee Emerson on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

I second the recommendation for Kwik Poly. Thirty some years ago I purchased a 47 Desoto convertible, out of a salvage yard. The wood top bow was in terrible condition. The upholstery shop that installed my new top, treated the Bow with Kwik Poly. After thirty some years the nails are holding just fine. Ed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 10:24 pm:

As Don and Eric have said, West System epoxy is a great product. I worked for the Gougeon brothers {West System } for over 10 years as a boatbuilder, as well as building wind turbine blades, flight simulator dome, wind tunnel blades for NASA, etc. West System can be used to repair any wood repairs you may need. Not that great with bonding to aluminum or steel, although it loves rusty metal, and will stick well. If you go to West System.com you will find loads of free info on woodworking repairs, Great product, a little expensive, but worth the price. Jim Derocher, AuGres, Michigan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Wednesday, August 09, 2017 - 12:38 am:

I use kwik poly and west systems epoxies
I tried one from home depot or lowes cant remember witch was not happy with it
Both work great on tack rails and bows
Even used kwik poly on wheels both auto and wagon for atleast 10 years now with great results


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, August 09, 2017 - 06:52 am:

I have used kwik poly for years since it was first introduced for antique auto market, It's a great product. It does a good job penetrating rotted wood, but in a lot of instances not deep enough. I have used it to tighten my 14 wheels, this was a once a year project as I put a lot of miles on this car. This was to tighten shrunken wood, not rot. I got sick of doing this and have just had Stutzman rebuild them. A friend of mine repaired his rotted 13 wheels with it and they look great, but knowing it's limitations I won't ride with him.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 09:58 pm:

Doug, I restore Antique furniture and have been for years. There is nothing better than KWIK POLY to restore wood. You put it on the wood and it sinks in. you can sand, shape or even add more if the wood is missing. For Model T wood , it's excellent. You can just brush it on, let it absorb in the wood, sand it and add more if you have to. You can re build the frame with out removing it from the body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

Another great wood restoring system similar to Kwik-Poly, is "Abatron". www.abatron.com. Just keep brushing on the Kwik Poly or Abatron as much as you can before it starts to set up and harden. The wood should keep on absorbing it and you want it to go as deep into the wood as possible before it plasticizes. It will continue sinking in until it sets up. but once it starts to harden, you will be unable to apply anymore, ever, for once it hardens it will not absorb anymore. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:32 am:

So let me ask this if I may. Many of you have much more real experience with Kwik Poly. I have some but only used it to try using it on a field coil, as an experiment, to see if it would seal suspect field coil wrappings so I could use them in engine builds for myself. I've done it three times on three engines, that were placed in cars that are driven regularly, about 4 years ago. A few months ago we pulled the engine just to see how it was holding up and to my surprise the field coil looked great. So that you know prior to doing this we cleaned the field coils with a degreaser and then let them sit out in the sun during the summer. They were all relatively clean. So I'm impressed with the stuff. Now for my question. Since it is 2 parts could you paint one part on let it soak in, repeat wither the same part let it soak again and then add the second part. The reason I ask is while working with the field coils the kwik Poly really set up fast. I realize that the heat in the south quickens the setup time. Would the scenario concerning the wood I described above work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 07:59 am:

John, I don't think that would be a good idea. Kwik-poly penetrates down to the good wood and works its way out,as it sets up. I realize that it sets up very quickly. The way that I use it is that I have four containers. one container for part A, one for part B , one filled with Lacquer thinner and the forth one to mix part A and part B. I apply mixed parts with a acid brush. when it starts to set up,I clean every thing with the lacquer thinner and start again. I try to only mix enough to get it used before it sets up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 12:52 am:

No, John that will not work. It must be mixed prior to application, It will not properly mix if applied separately. I have never used Kwik-Poly and can see where having a fast set up time can be problematic in, perhaps, not having enough time to absorb as much as possible into the wood. I have always used Abatron which has a long set up time so that more of the 2 part wood restorer liquid can be applied and thus more can be absorbed into the wood. Abatron also has a fantastic, very clean, 2 part wood epox putty that can be mixed and applied with your hands and once it sets up sands, and can be worked just like wood. I love it. Jim Patrick

PS. For field coils, I and rebuilders use Glyptal red insulating paint. Invented by Thomas Edison to insulate the windings of his electric motors, it is impervious to heat and oil and is what Ford originally used back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 01:22 am:

If younuse ot on say a field coil that coils should be extra careful clean of all oil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roy Stone on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 01:33 pm:

I haven't tried it myself but been told if you cool it before mixing you will increase the applying time. (fwiw)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 08:29 pm:

The company's web-site states that anything you can do to cool the part and/or the material will extend the pot life of the mix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 09:21 pm:

John, as some mentioned above "Cool" everything you can to slow the reaction time. I have put the 2 parts in the fridge, use very shallow pans to mix in , worked in a air conditioned room, and have had almost 12 minutes of work time. Plan your attack and have a helper if needed. The stuff is so thin of a liquid it soaks very very deep almost instantly. I did a test on a new piece of planed and sanded white oak lumber at normal room temp. I just poured it on the surface and let it soak till it started to jell. then whipped it off. I then cut the piece of wood in half to see how far it penetrated. On new white oak lumber I have had it penetrate 1/32 inch. That does not sound like much, but remember that the top 1/32 of that piece of wood now has the same characteristics of fiberglass. On old porus wood it can soak all the way through. It accepts paint very well, sands easy, and so far I have never had a paint failure over wood. I have also used it on old mag rings. It does not conduct electricity, and is very resistant to oil, gas, and acids. So far no failures on the mag rings I used it on. I also cleaned the mag ring very well with gasoline, then a quick rinse with lacquer thinner, then dried for a day in the sun. I placed the mag ring in a shallow plastic tub and used aprox a 1/2 can of part A and part B. (aprox 15.00 worth) I dumped them into a bucket to mix them quickly and then quickly just poured it onto the mag ring in the plastic tub. By sloshing the Kwik Poly around very forcefully in the tub I could keep the whole mag ring wet. As soon as I saw it start to jell in the tub my helper (wife :-)) and I quickly wiped off the excess on the contact, poles, and mounting surface.as well as the metal frame. As long as the contact, poles, and the mounting surface are clean, the rest does not matter. After it all sets up, I took a 3M scuff pad to do final clean up to the surfaces. Poor boys have poor ways. for aprox 30.00 worth of materials, and a tested mag ring with no shorts, I was good to go. Some of those rings were done over 20 years ago (or more) and still going. Is it the right way to do it, ? Probably not, But if you have very little funds, you do what works... Today I would probably just buy a rebuilt mag ring, but back then, I could not afford to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

John, using the resin, then the hardener separate would not work, all 2 part coatings have to be mixed completely to cure. In the summer with epoxy we put the mixed glue in a roller pan, setting in another larger roller pan covered in ice cubes. Some epoxies have different hardeners with different "pot life". as Donnie said, have everything ready and have a plan, JD


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