Terminology

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Terminology
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:03 pm:

I've had a number of terminology discussions with Russ Furstnow, and I have managed to get him to change some in the judging guidelines, Thanks Russ. Lately Russ has become interested in top boots, and he nailed me on this one! The correct term for top boot is Top Cover, or Top Dust Cover!
Lets start using the correct names for parts guys!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

You mean like, accelerator instead of foot feed? Instrument panel instead of dash board? Glove compartment instead of dash box? Trunk instead of cooter hull? Nope, can't see it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:18 pm:

Actually Top Boot better explains what is meant by the cover over the top which has been lowered. Top Cover, or Top Dust Cover sounds more like the car cover which is made to cover the entire car while parked.

Whether or not those terms were used 90 or more years ago or not, that is what they imply today.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:26 pm:

I will use the term top dust cover and I will dress in period correct clothing when I speak or write it.

Now, back to the davenport, where I'll sip on a high ball. Later, I'll get out of these dress slacks, put on some putter pants, and work on the old Ford. No where is that monkey wrench? Zounds!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:32 pm:

Personally, I get a "kick" out of knowing that on the other side of The Great Pond, 'ol Henry wears a bonnet (usually) :-)

Someone said that times are a-changing :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

I think that we should also include the Ford part number of any part we discuss in all forum posts, so there can be no ambiguity. This should be mandatory for all forum members or suffer the consequences. People who use "Top Cover" may not recognize "Top Dust Cover", but if you use the Ford part number, there is no question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 09:46 pm:

Good idea Hal! I'm all for it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

Colloquialisms! Why is it always colloquialisms! :-)

Actually, I like to use the correct words whenever I can.
However, I can't remember many times when I have ever heard "those things" called anything but a "top boot".

At least with "splash shields" and "splash aprons", I have heard them called several ways to Sunday nearly all my life.

More colloquialisms!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

Robert g , my father called it the RUM HOLE.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:06 am:

Ammeter,.....NOT "amp meter". If this continues, pretty soon we'll be saying "speed meter" instead of "speedometer"! (:^)

I think the reason the old original term ammeter is slowly becoming the incorrect term "amp meter" has to do with the fact that 25 years or so ago (maybe longer ago,....I don't know) is that cars began to be equipped with "volt meters". But I really think that as "old car enthusiasts", we should do what we can to use the original correct term,.....AMMETER!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:44 am:

Harold,

Voltometer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:47 am:

I have developed my own terminology;

Throttle = Acceleratrix or velocitator
Brake = Decceleratrix
Starter Switch = "Make car go" button


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:59 am:

Hubcaps/grease cups.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 09:22 am:

I'm still elbow deep tightening my gudgeon pins. The top assembly is for later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:06 pm:

Ah - put things in the boot (not what you think it is I bet) and make sure you close the bonnet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 12:27 am:

Adrian W, I always put my mud boots in the the trunk.

My Simpson 260 is called a Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter (actually all caps on the cover, but I didn't want to shout). It belonged to one of my dads friends who passed away about ten years before my dad did. This particular unit is almost like new, including the Operator's manual. My dad had several of these through the years. Most of them well used. When his friend passed, my dad helped with the estate. He kept this meter because it was so nice, and used it himself only in the shop, never in the truck. It is still in its original Simpson case, with a little breakage on the folds, otherwise very nice.
Growing up around engineers, I usually heard them called Volt-Ohmmeters for short.

Now, back to the joys of linguistics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 06:37 am:

Hi Wayne, yes, well, we put our boots in the boot!
That is a case of 'putting in the boot'
Oh, how I love a common language :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 08:04 am:

I can usually always figure out what the part is meant to be, but what I can't figure out is every one who abbreviates with first letters only. I am not a very good speller, but I feel like I have to take a class to not spell at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 08:36 am:

Sadly Hal, your post went right over Larry's head. Or is the proper term noggin or squash?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 09:21 am:

Y'all mean that thig-a-mabob is not proper terminology? If I still smoked I would fill up my ash receiver!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 11:27 am:

G.R., thingamabob is proper terminology, as is "gizmo", "whatchamacallit" and "bojangle".

"Thingy" and "whatzit" are not, as these terms are too imprecise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 03:45 pm:

I still don't know the difference between a bolt and a cap screw. They look alike to me.

Cotter pin or split pin?

And, screwdrivers really don't transport the screw anywhere, do they? Two seperate tools, a screw tightener and a screw loosener.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 04:03 pm:

Don't forget dingus on doomaflagy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

Many years go, I had a co-worker who was USA born, Mexican descent. Nice guy, hard worker.
One day we went into an auto supply (he needed something for his pickup). He shows the clerk a part of his throttle linkage and says "I need the chingaderra (I probably misspelled that) that clips on here to hold this in place." The clerk says "What the h@!! is a chingaderra?" My friend instantly comes back apologizing "I'm sorry, I was thinking in Spanish. I meant the thingamajig."

Colloquialisms. Why is it always colloquialisms.

English is one of the most difficult languages in the world. It has foundations in several ancient languages beyond the Latin that itself forms several of the English language foundations. English is also one of the most expressive languages in the world, with so many ways to say the same things. Like Spanish, English really needs to be divided into many related languages (but I despise divisive politics). Castilian Spanish is similar to Mexican Spanish, however, not nearly the same, while South and Central America have variations of their own. Much like the USA and England versus Australian (among others) English.
How many words are in any given language depends on who you ask, and how they count them. Generally, English seems to have two to three times as many words as does Spanish.
No wonder we have a difficult time giving a boot the boot into the boot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 10:28 pm:

Wayne
I used that Spanish slang while working in a gas station down in SoCal over forty years ago thinking it was a "thingamajig" also. The Hispanic lady customer politely told me it was off-color. I now know too many inappropriate uses for the first two syllables of that slang word.

At the funeral for my grandson's great grandma. The Lt Governor for Santa Clara Pueblo speaking in the native language Tewa used the Spanish word for machine. I found out later when the Spanish came here several hundred years ago, Pueblo Indians did not have machines hence no need for the word.

What gear(s) are you in if you are IN Ruckstell? I have an answer but it may not be your answer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 11:12 pm:

Wayne, what are mud boots? Do you blokes have cow poop boots, pig pen boots, concreters boots etc. We have rubber boots to do all that sloppy stuff. I believe the poms call them wellies, short for Wellington boots.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 02:45 am:

Allen B, More colloquialisms. Mud boots are usually rubber boots for working in clay or gumbo mud. The same rubber boots are used for cow pastures and slopping pigs, which thankfully, I have not had to do many times in my life. I also call my worn out old leather boots "mud boots" because I use them for the same purpose. Around parts of Califunny, there can be either red or gray clay, that when more than a little wet is horribly sticky and builds up on shoes and boots to enormous masses. One must carry a stick (or something like a large putty knife or small shovel) to keep scraping the mud off as each step adds a couple pounds. When I was working around the stuff, I usually carried at least two pair of boots designated for mud. Get out of truck, change boots, do work (scraping mud off often). Go back to truck, change back to clean boots. Drive away. I wasn't about to clean those things every day! I usually let the mud dry, then chipped it off the boots with a hammer.

Kirk P, "Off color"? That doesn't surprise me. An awful lot of slang in American English also has off color connotations. I imagine the slang around other parts of the world is similar, just different. I am pretty sure I do not really want to know that much of it.
As for being "in Ruckstell"? In a general sense, I just consider it like the Ruckstell instructions used it. One is using "high gear", or "in Ruckstell". However, technically, it is in a planetary reduction gear (which has more than just a couple gears involved). I look forward to reading your answer! I am always trying to learn more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 07:50 am:

Wayne it's not just the difference between countries that speak"ENGLISH" the Differences in regions of this country are amazing. I think it would make for a good comedy skit to have a southern boy go to a diner in Maine and try to order dinner!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 09:13 am:

Wayne,
I agree with you. I learned a lot of different Spanish words on the "street" than I did in the classroom. And my knowledge of Spanish is very limited. There was a Ruckstell terminology discussion sometime back. I also consider Ruckstell like the instructions used it. I think the four shift lever positions associated with a Ruckstell should be labeled Ford high, Ford Low, Ruckstell high and Ruckstell low. However not everybody agrees with that and sometimes it takes a while into the conversation to figure out what "gear" is being talked about.

Take care


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 09:26 am:

The electric starter was always called a Self Commencer by the old gentleman that guided me in me love of T's back in the 60's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 10:11 am:

The last straw was when I saw valence used instead of radiator apron! This incorrect term carried over from Bruce's black book into the current judging guidelines. Give me a break!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

How can terminology be about vehicle parts?

It is the study of end of life!

Which I am trying to avoid!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 03:12 pm:

Wouldn't that be "terminalology" ?!?

I seem to recall "valence" as a term used in chemistry class. A "valance" is a term often associated with drapery . . . Then there's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance", probably shot him for calling a radiator "apron" a valence ?!?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, August 14, 2017 - 03:24 pm:

I'm just glad some folks' biggest problems in life are limited to what other people choose to call a damned car part.


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