Dust cap ?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Dust cap ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 11:43 pm:

Not sure what this is called but I'm missing two. I Looked at Lang's but could not find anything. Any ideas on what to use or where to find the appropriate caps.model t dust capmodel t dust cap


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:04 am:

Here's some Carl, they come in couple different sizes.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2715D.aspx

https://www.modeltford.com/item/3846.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:46 am:

Thank you John, That helps a lot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:46 am:

Hi Carl,

The links which John provided are for the oilers currently available.

The oiler in your photograph is the remains of the so called "man hole" type oiler, which has lost it's cover. The cover was retained by an internal spring and would allow the cover to be opened from any position. Those oilers are not being reproduced.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 09:13 am:

Thanks Bill, My question is what do I do. Is there something I can use, Will those other oilers work? Would like to find something to keep crud out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 10:19 am:

A dust cap is what covers the valve stem on your wheels, if you have the correct valve stems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 11:54 am:

Some of the manhole oilers had the base machined as part of the piece. The shackle bushing oilers look to be the replaceable type, they can just be twisted out with pliers. The tie rod and king pin ones, you would need to replace or turn off the old piece and bore to accept the new one. Or fine a black cap that will fit over the oiler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:11 pm:

Looks like I need to find some kind of cap to fit over it. Let the search begin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 04:23 pm:



Carl, if this is for your 1919 you're in luck. The cheap flip-top oilers (1917-1927) are correct for your car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 04:30 pm:

By the way, that spring on your linkage is an accessory band-aid for loose or wobbly steering. It would be a good idea to go through all the steering parts and replace whatever you find that's worn out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

I think I found something that should work. A little black paint and presto.model t dust capmodel t dust capmodel t dust cap


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 09:59 pm:

Thanks Steve. So maybe a front end rebuild may be in order this winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 10:55 pm:

I like your style Carl! A model T owner thinking outside the box to keep his old Ford going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

When Mark from Oregon mentioned little black cap, That helped and got me thinking. Course when I'm thinking the wife says that's when I'm dangerous, mainly to myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 09:41 am:

It's amazing to me the number of people in this hobby that go to the trouble of doing something incorrectly! Why not do it right in the first place? Of course, research is the key.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:26 am:

BUT, it works Larry. Not everyone is as particular as some on this forum. I didn't originally post as I didn't have a solution for the OP, though I like the one he came up with. This is your second post to this thread with nothing to offer but criticism.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ressijac on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:44 am:

Hi Carl,

I had to replace several missing or broke oilers on my car when I got it. Got them from Lang's but be aware there are 2 sizes. I found that if you put the new oiler in the freezer for a couple of hours they contract just enough to make them install easier and sit deeper.


Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 03:06 pm:

Larry's point is that it often takes just as much work to do something incorrectly as it does to do it correctly (not counting the research to find out what is correct, of course). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 03:54 pm:

I dunno Mark. A trip to Loews is pretty quick in most parts :-) I still feel a non comment would have been better post repair :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 04:45 pm:

Larry, As a newbe to model t's I'm sure you must know much more than me. According to another poster my oiler is not reproduced. The one's on Langs are a different type since mine appear to be cast in. I asked a question looking for help, if you have an answer I am anxious to hear it. I was just looking for something to keep dirt and water out, But if you are just going to bust my balls I don't see where you are of any help.CF.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

Carl, I don't know of any parts with cast in oilers. What you show is a man hole type, minus the cover. It is a press fit the same as the later flip top style. If you get a pair of side cutters on it, it should deform and you will be able to lever it out. The later flip top style is an easy swap, and they are not expensive. That will give you the dust cap you seek, and a model T fix which is easily reversed if you ever get lucky enough to find an original man hole type.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:20 pm:

There were early "machined" body manhole oilers with spring loaded, attached lids in both the spindle & tie rod bolts - I have some - photos to come .....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 12:34 am:

Ok, Great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 11:27 am:

If Carl would post the year of his car it would be helpful. Did anyone notice the hole in the spring leaf, which also requires an oiler? It is true that Ford was experimenting with oilers around 1917, and there were some press in manhole type oilers used during that period.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 11:39 am:

Only took a second to find it's a '19


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 03:49 pm:

Yes it's a 1919. So if I understand correctly the man hole oiler is a press in type? And that it will pull or twist out and there's no repro but one from Lang's will work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 08:22 pm:

Carl, you are correct in your last post, at least until someone comes up with evidence to the contrary. Given the vicissitudes of model T parts identification, I reserve my right to be wrong again!

Allan from down under.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration