Electric fuel pump question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Electric fuel pump question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Campbell on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 11:45 pm:

We are looking for a 6v electric fuel pump to put into a 27 Depot Hack. Tank under the seat. Need recommendations on a brand. Also what fuel pressure?? I assume we need a regulator as well?? Can it be wired to a T ignition switch??

Thanks!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:01 am:

You can buy a 12 volt fuel pump and it will run on six volt with much less psi around 3psi I've been told by a friend that does that. He says that about all you need on stock T carbs. So say my friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:03 am:

Why do you think you need a fuel pump or is there a reason you are putting one on? (like down draft carb). Yes you will need a regulator, about 1 1/2 pound would be about right. I would suggest google "fordbarn.com; electric fuel pump". There has been a lot of talk in the V8 section covering both full time and use as a priming pump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Campbell on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:10 am:

The tank that someone installed under the seat is slightly lower than the fuel inlet for the carburetor. Going up a hill would certainly cut off the fuel flow to the carburetor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:31 am:

Get the Airtex E8902 from Amazon. About $35. It's 6V and low pressure and dependable. They come with a filter, which I never use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 10:06 am:

Not sure I understand how the tank can be lower than the carb, but if it's installed incorrectly, I would fix that rather than putting on a bandaid. The vast majority of T's had the tank under the seat. The bottom of those tanks are above the frame rail. The carb inlet, at least on every one I've ever seen, is below the top of the frame rail. No REAL steep hills where I live, but there are some. I've never had to back up a hill and I usually run my tanks down to within an inch or so on the stick before I worry too much about filling up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 10:35 am:

Robert,

Does the bottom of the tank sit below the frame rails? If you're just looking at where the fuel line comes out of the sediment bulb then that's not important. Only the level of the bottom of the tank matters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

Ha!
Only the level of the gas matters! :-)

Have run plenty of tours in TN and NC where it took 8-9 gallons in the tank to reach the top of the hill. The rest of the day was gravy after that.

But really, Jerry, I understand what your saying...no offense meant in my post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:00 pm:

I hope that Airtex quality is better then it was when I was working in the automotive repair business. If we could find no alternative supplier for a pump, we would tell the customer (and write on the work order) that we would warranty the part through Airtex, but would not warranty the labor. Defective Airtex pumps ran in the 15-20% range. This goes back to the mid 80s and before, so they may be better now. If they are made in China, they probably are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Gillette on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:05 pm:

Carter carb makes two gerotor inline pumps (quiet!)
P/N P60430 provides 4-6 psi on 12V, 2-3 psi on 6V.
P/N P60504 provides 2-4 psi on 12 V, 1-2 psi on 6V

I run a P60504 on an '11T, '15T and a '14 Overland with great success. If you need a pressure regulator, use Holley 12-804 which provides 1 to 4 psi adjustment and is reliable. I have not needed a regulator on any of these three application.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:03 pm:

My other suggestion would be to install a switch and only run the pump when needed, such as going up hills. Let gravity do it's thing the rest of the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glenn W. Beers on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:53 pm:

Robert,

I run a Carter fuel pump P/N P4259 6V, Holley regulator P/N 12-804. To power the pump I use a relay triggered by the ignition switch it is a 6V 5 pin relay from Speedway Motors P/N 910-64104 . Also run a fuel filter FIRST B-4 the pump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 09:54 pm:

How many of these installations are in speedsters that are not stock? Running a different carb may require a different setup then a stock car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 10:05 pm:

I would look at raising the tank if possible. If that is not possible you could add a vacuum tank on the cowl such as on later 30's cars. Another solution would be to add an air pump but that would require the vent cap to be sealed. I run this system on a racer and it works just fine. With a full tank you have to pump frequently but as the fuel level drops there is more "head space" for air and less pumping. This is "fail safe" with no loss of power for a fuel pump and loss of battery.

A vacuum tank might be your better solution, they mount high and fuel is pulled up to the small cowl tank by the intake then supply the carburetor by gravity. I have no experience with this system but apparently they worked for a non-pressurized system.

Again, I have not done this but it worked on other early automobiles. Other posters will have better input than me as too if this is an option or not and I would also like to read their response. Those vacuum tanks have always been something I was interested in but don't fully understand how they work and if it would make a Model T run poorly.

Regards and I would like to see responses;

Tim Moore


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