OT -- use of a marine carburetor for street use

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT -- use of a marine carburetor for street use
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer in Troy, New York on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 05:31 pm:

This isn't a very Model T oriented question but you guys are an amazingly smart group. So. . . .

Does anyone know if it is OK to run a car with a marine carburetor? Specifically I have a Zenith 63M/263M which is more-or-less a universal replacement carburetor although designed for marine use.

Some have said that it cannot compensate for a richer mixture needed when pulling up a hill and other things, and therefore will cause burned valves, melted pistons, nuclear fusion, etc.

I'd appreciate any comments. I know you shouldn't run a road carburetor on a boat, but I don't know about the other way around.

--Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 05:52 pm:

Looks like it's feasible, but you may have to modify the jetting and venting.

https://www.google.com/search?q=running+a+marine+carburetor+on+the+street&rlz=1C 1CHBD_enUS737US737&oq=running+a+marine+carburetor+on+the+street&aqs=chrome..69i5 7.8950j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer in Troy, New York on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

Thanks, Mark. I read that link and others. No one has come right out and said it can't be done. . . except for this poster on the AACA forum who was adamant that he would never run a marine carburetor under any circumstances. Claims to have blow up engines. He just got me pretty scared.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Saturday, August 12, 2017 - 10:03 pm:

I've seen petrol engine marine carburettors that have a angled
carburettor base to compensate for the angle the engine is on in the vessel. I not aware of any other differences but I'm no marine expert !
Alan in Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 01:54 pm:

Carburetors mix fuel and air. It doesn't matter whether the carburetor is mounted on a boat, car, truck, airplane, or ski lift engine. Some have differing operating environments - a boat carburetor designed for an inboard engine would not vent into the bilge, aircraft carburetors sometimes have a vent that is connected to an overflow tube and will have a pilot-controlled mixture (like a Model T), but it still mixes fuel and air. As long as the mixture is calibrated somewhere near where it should be, and the CFM is reasonable for the engine, it will work.
Alan - I have seen many angled intake manifolds on American V8s for the same reason.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

I have seven modern carburetors with a total of 17.00 in all. one new, four the same and two the same like new all have a hundred year better atomization design then an NH. All are side draft.
Its going to be fun this winter seeing if I can adjust them for T use. If not its no big loss.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 03:50 pm:

A marine engine is set to run at a certain RPM, so imangine a carb with no accel pump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 05:07 pm:

It depends on the engine and the application. The same is true of aircraft carburetors - some have accelerator pumps, some do not. A ski boat with an inboard without an accelerator pump would be kinda hard to operate. Model T carburetors work fine without an accelerator pump circuit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 06:03 pm:

Unless for some reason it was jetted so large that it ran gas past the rings and into the oil I can't see how it would blow up an engine. Can't really see how that would do a marine engine any good either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 07:30 pm:

I experimented with motorcycle carbs in the past, found out two cycle carbs do not work well with four cycle engines by design.
most four cycle carbs use an enriching device no choke butterfly. Most have a variable intake controlled with a flat slide or a round one. Most have seven levels of overlapping atomization using various methods. Most do not have a pump just like an NH. The ones used in my racing days were a large improvement even just a ten year newer design from the carb removed.

Never tried a boat carb, salt water tends to cancer every thing on boats around here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 11:01 pm:

Some carbs have an air correction jet instead of an accelerated pump.
The Dodge 3/4 tom weapons carriers I worked on in the Army in the fifties did not have an accelerater pump.
I have seen model T Fords run very well for many years with two Harley carbs. Also SU carbs & Webers.
I like an NH mounted to a vaporizer manifold. It puts the carb up high a little above the intake ports eliminating the updraft weakness.


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