Coast to coast IV

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Coast to coast IV
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 12:23 am:

Continued from http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/776901.html?1502769530

WELL. Fun times all round today. My motel manager as promised kindly took me to Herschel - Belle Fourche's resident T guy. He had 30 at one point, now down to a barn find Fordor. Great chap, & a very skilled restorer. Had some amazing Packards etc. My cardboard gaskets were literally toast, but Herschel had no new washers/steel rings... so I had to recycle a load from a selection of his old T manifolds. We got 6 decent rings after he put them in his sandblaster. In the end used some soft steel gaskets that Gary (motel manager) sourced from his janitor. Herschel & his mate Mark helped me wedge them in (sorry to spoil your fun, Tony!) with some high-temp sealant. The exhaust manifold was pretty warped & required heavy persuasion. Didn't need to take the big exhaust nut off though.

Anyway, car was running much better, though still a little blimey, so off I went on the long (195-mile) drive to Dickinson. Disclosure: I'd booked a rental car from there, driving back to Denver to pick my wife up - she's bravely volunteered to accompany me for a week or so. BUT... at Bowman ND, about halfway, I pulled into a gas station... and when I drove out, the steering wheel failed to do its job. Tie rod had snapped in two!!! Scary in the extreme - I'd been driving 37-39 for hours on a narrow road full of speeding trucks. But also brilliantly fortunate, as I was being waved away by Bowman's local T blokes, Ken & Lynn, who'd come up while I was parked. They helped me whip the rod bits off, then drove me to the local welders (90 year old & his son). They made two bits one, Ken & Lynn heroically helped me reattach everything, and off I drove cautiously into the gleaming. Just made it to Dickinson. WHAT A DAY.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 12:24 am:

Ken & Lynn at work...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 12:26 am:

Blowy, not blimey. And gloaming, not gleaming. Sigh.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 01:19 am:

Holy... moley.
See you (type) in a few days.
Safe travels to Denver and back to that model T.
That's really cool that your dear wife is going to ride with you for a spell. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 05:08 am:

Tim did you get a picture of the broken tie rod? Was it an old weld that failed? Would like some more detail on what happened. sounds like you were very lucky? Picture some of the places you have been already and what would have happened if it broke there!!! Really enjoying "riding along" with you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J. Marino - League City, Texas on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 07:20 am:

I spent four freezing cold winters in Minot back in the early 70's.

If you are going to dip your toes (tyres) into Canada the International Peace Gardens used to be a beautiful place to do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 08:25 am:

Like the others, enjoying each installment as armchair co-pilot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Walker on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 09:16 am:

Aw, Tim, you're missing out on a great time -- driving the T into and out of Denver! LOL!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lester in Floyd, VA on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 09:28 am:

Tim, I'm so glad for you, that you're not riding a 20 inch two speed through a frozen purgatory devoid of helpful people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:12 am:

Tim, this is the kind of stories I like hearing about. Road side repairs and patching things up with what ever is available. You can only do that with a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Did the tie rod break right where the steering stabilizer clamps on? I've seen that happen before.

I really hope you can source another tie rod before you go too much further.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 11:17 am:

Tim, if you get a chance, please post a picture of the weld repair on this thread.

I hope whoever did the repair slid a sleeve over one of the broken pieces, then welded the broken pieces together, then ground the welds so that the sleeve could be slid over the repaired area and rosette welded to both parts of the rod. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 12:06 pm:

Tim,
It looks like the title of your book will be:
Fix
Or
Repair
Daily

I am glad you are okay. I pray for your continual safety.

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 05:14 pm:

A few of the many tie rods I have seen over the years did not have the long unwelded seam running the length of the rod. For vent and drying reasons, most of those odd ones have a very small hole, right in the middle, on the bottom side. In theory, the idea is that this hole should allow water to drain out, and not collect inside from condensation. In practice, it doesn't work out that well. The inside of the tie rod doesn't get painted to protect the metal from corrosion (unless someone goes to considerable extra effort to do so). Temperature changes cause the airspace inside to "breath", the moisture gets sucked in and condenses near the hole (usually within about an inch, or 20cm if I remember that correctly). Corrosion over years forms near the little hole, creating a weak spot from the inside.
Model T tie rods usually break near the threaded end. If one breaks in the middle? And it has not suffered some sort of damage (another common cause of breakage) near the middle? The tie rod is most likely one of those with the little hole in the middle.
Those after-market spring anti-rattlers are also a common source of damage to tie rods.
I have wondered for many years what the story is behind those tie rods. They are not common, but not really rare. Were they replacements? Late version? If anyone wants to discuss further, we should start a new thread. I don't know the answer.

Tim M, Glad it happened safely. Model Ts seem to do that more often than not. A few years ago, I had a model T racing car that I basically drove only on Endurance Runs. It had been on a couple, and was being readied to go to another, when I broke the tie rod, in my driveway. But it was a common type, and broke on the threaded end.
Have fun! Drive safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 06:11 pm:

Wayne - "....long unwelded seam"? "Very small hole, right in the middle" and on the bottom to drain water out?

I guess I'm confused. I thought Tim was talking about the "tie rod" that ties the two steering arms on the spindles together. But it seems like you are talking about the radius rods,..... thehollow vee-shaped members that support the front axle by bracing against the crankcase. (???)

Did you take any pictures Tim?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 07:32 pm:

Jerry - that was EXACTLY where it snapped. Clean "new" break, no previous weld. Wayne - I have the unwelded seam, made it easier for the welder to line the two bits up. Mark - the guy just electro-welded a load of welding wire between the two halves. One of my saviours (Lynn) did ask him to put a rod inside the fractured area or a sleeve over it before welding, but he said: "I'm doing a proper repair, not a farm yard job!"

I confess the weld doesn't fill me with confidence, but the welder & his dad have over 100 years experience between them and they were totally satisfied with their repair. "If anything it's now too solid!"

No photos, I was too traumatised. Will take a snap of the weld when I'm reunited with the T (probably two days time, as I'm pretty sure my wife won't fancy doing our 600 mile return drive in one go...)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 08:15 pm:

Harold S, No, I am referring to the rod that connects right to left wheels, and steers both from the drag link.
As I recall, earlier (before 1918) tie rods were some sort of seamless tubing, no vent hole. Some of them were open on one end. I don't know how that tubing was made. I think I need to take a very close look at the cut and broken tie rods in my junk pile to see what type of tubing they used. Most '20s tie rods I have looked at were rolled flat-stock, open seam, not welded. I think I have some remnants from broken enclosed ones.
I think we need to start a thread for this. If someone else doesn't beat me to it? I will try to later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 08:51 am:

If there's no reinforcing rod or sleeve as part of the repair, I would take precautions.

Maybe wrap the welded area with a layer or two of sheet steel (tin can?), clamped in place with a couple of hose clamps. Then at least the two sides of the rod won't drop and drag on the ground in case the weld breaks.

Good luck! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:50 am:

Tim,

That's why I don't like those stabilizers.

Please try to find another tie rod along the way and as long the car will still steer o.k., try not using the stabilizer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 11:56 pm:

Not trying to be a fear monger but I've seen many things fail just outside the weld area. As if the weld process crystallizes the material in a cooler spot next door and then it's too brittle there.

Hammers and things in a factory setting that were made there and then needed a re-weld (12 times) because we used them hard.
I even see this where I'm at now. The old hammer is holding but the small hub-cap driver is cracked all around the last 2 welds.
Granted the vibration is much less on a T's tie rod.
I welded 2 drag links together (overlapping) 20 years ago to make one on my 24 and I want to say "Get another tie rod too."

OT, sorry. On a piece of equipment I was involved with, had a customer call and ask that he get a few SOLID round tie rods to try as the tube-style 3/4" ID NF tie rods were getting bent when hit at a bigger Chicago airport. Got the special order of 5 processed, parts department sent him the order and later on Dennis calls me and says they break the tie rod ends off now.
Extreme? Yes. The airlines ground support folks have given me an appreciation for stuff that can be wrecked.

Tim, would you consider replacing the tie rod?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 12:29 am:

If any of you ever get involved with setting up your T's steering according to the Ackerman principle, you will need to lengthen the tie rod. We do this by cutting and shutting two rods. Each rod is drilled either side of the join so we can weld through the holes onto a solid rod inserted in the cut tie rods. The ends of the rod are left 1/4" apart so the joint can be welded right around and to the inserted strengthening rod. We file back to flush so the repair is invisible. We have yet to have an issue with this modification.

There is no reason why the same process cannot be used to repair a broken tie rod, the repair being permanent, or just do it to get home.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 12:40 am:

Tim; if you PM me an address I will ship one to you, even if I have to send it Fedex overnight. It may not be pretty, but the price is right :-) .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 01:14 am:

After repairing or changing the tie rod, it's important to check front wheel alignment and adjust if necessary. Bad alignment can be very costly, destroying tires quickly. See pages 45-47 in the service manual.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

Back on the road! Gentle baptism for the missus, just 61 miles to Medora ND (though a lot of it on a dirt road through Painted Canyon State Park). With a little loop of Theodore Roosevelt Nat Park - very lovely, thanks for the tip. A bit strange but very welcome to have front-seat company...

Haven't got a good snap of the tie rod weld. Ross L reckons it'll be fine as long as I move the damper four inches away from the weld. Looks like that will involve drilling though. In other news, I BADLY NEED A HAIRCUT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 07:24 am:

IM (and many others I'm sure) HO you shouldn't need the steering damper.
It's only useful function is to inhibit shimmy, and a bit of friction elsewhere will do that.
If you don't get shimmy (usually at about 12mph) you can leave it off I think.
I share others' worries about the tie-rod, especially as you don't seem to like tarmac roads!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J. Marino - League City, Texas on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 08:08 am:

Looks like a west bound route finally into the Big Sky country!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 06:19 pm:

I've been a proponent of stabilizers on T's. The subject has been brought up before, but for the benefit of those who know little about them, I feel this is important to revisit it. I've driven T's since 1976, driving many more miles than normal. In my opinion the steering is the weakest link driving a T. Under the right conditions if you hit a rough edge or shoulder of a road the wheels can flip instantly, and results can be deadly. In all my thousands of miles of driving a T, it has happened to me three different times. The car has almost flipped over each time. I was lucky! There have been a few fatality's in the past few years that I believe this played a part in. The stabilizer keeps this from happening. This is not a cover-up for a faulty front end. I put one of these on my wife's T, she didn't realize it until after I told her. She noticed no difference in driving it.

I was very concerned when I read about Tim's recent post regarding his tie rod breaking, with the stabilizer being a possible cause. I took the stabilizer off my 14 as I drive this one the most, and examined the tie rod. This was a new old stock tie rod when I rebuilt the front end 15,000+ miles ago. It is a seam welded rod. There appears to be no damage to it, but it got me thinking. I reinstalled it, but used a window channel material between the clamp and rod. I also installed hose clamps on each side of this in case it loosened for any reason. I also used it on the axle clamp. The axle clamp has been the only issue I have had with this set up. It did loosen up once and affected the steering by not turning a sharp left. The instructions warn you to check this. I have these on three of my T's I drive the most. I will be checking the others also. Another benefit is you can back up the car safely without the wheels flopping back-and-forth.

In the past this is been a hotly contested subject. I feel this information is a safety issue that needs to be shared. This will be my only post about the pros and cons. I will answer questions, but I will not argue about it, as I said in the beginning of the post this is my opinion.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

Thanks all. I think on balance I'll try to keep the damper as even with it I've had a few scary front wheel moments.

Wow, Montana is lonesome. Though impressively epic. Did my first stretch of Interstate, 50-odd miles to Glendive, but almost no traffic. Then on to Jordan, 172 miles in total. Tiny town but has a 1930s soda fountain!

Have found a guy here who can drill a hole in the axle so I can move the d-link away from the weld. Some rather ominous con-rod style knocking developing today...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 12:31 am:

This is just too fun! AND the Ol' Lady along with? Please take no offense as some out here call the other-half that.
Ma'am, how do you like the ride in the T?
Knocks? Oh oh. More adventure coming your way, you two?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 12:33 am:

Get that rod tightened while it is still simple!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 08:12 am:

Another rod knock? Ugh! And so soon.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 12:00 pm:

I confess that I have not read all of the posts in this thread, but aircraft builders pretty much solved the internal corrosion problem in the old rag and tube airplanes by soaking the interior of all steel tubes with boiled linseed oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 03:12 pm:

Any T people in or near Billings? Need a hole drilled in my axle & some assistance with sourcing & fitting a new con rod (knock is really bad now).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 04:18 pm:

Tim

I am 80 miles south of Billings, in Clark, WY.

If you cannot get help in/around Billings (I'd be surprised if you don't, but who knows?) send me a PM and we'll see what we can do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 06:26 pm:

Thanks, Scott! Very kind. I'm heading that way so could possibly persuade my ailing, LOUD T to cover those 80 miles at a gentle pace. PM sent!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 06:34 pm:

Don't beat your crank to death. Better to be towed than demolished. No PM come through yet but will be patient.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 07:11 pm:

Got your PM and have replied


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 04:51 am:

I saw your damper photo and it worries me. The huge offset from the tie-rod means that it gets an 'S' bend fatigue loading it was not designed for every time it operates. Before you drill the axle, is it possible to locate the clamp near the end of the rod?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 02:52 pm:

Will do, Chris.

Waiting on a tow to Scott's in Wyoming. Went to the rodeo here in Billings last night - tremendous!

I must emphasise that the last rod bearing gave up over 3,000 miles back - frankly I'm amazed at how well the car has stood up to over 5,000 miles of abuse!

Couple of pics from yesterday. My wife found the heavy sidewind extremely challenging. "Driving in this car is more like riding a horse!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 03:07 pm:

I presume you know not to tow a T on its own wheels. You can destroy the transmission for lack of oil. Get a flatbed or a trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 01:39 am:

Flatbed tow with the hood down as advised (first time since the first day of the trip!). Driver took us down to Scott's charming place out in farflung Wyoming: three-storey log cabin with epic vistas, plus the all-important big new shop full of great Ts (two brass rad ones). Scott and I whipped the pan off and beheld the now traditional spectacle: rattling rod (no 3) plus great nuggets of Babbitt. It's a goner, new one ordered off the ever biddable Ross. Scott has established that my crankshaft is now a couple of thousandths off true, but reckons that if I drop the speed a little more I should make it over the line. Top chap - above & beyond all this, he and his wife Althea have fed and accommodated us tonight! The T community has singlehandedly restored my faith in human nature.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lester in Floyd, VA on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 11:20 am:

I'M assuming that most of us Yanks know that "hood" in Limey means "top".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 11:38 am:

Hi, Tim. I have very much enjoyed following your tour and misadventures on this forum.

Btw, you won't find nicer folks than the Congers. You lucked out, finding them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 07:22 pm:

Can you imagine what a boring trip you would have had in a modern car...yes, I think you can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 10:42 pm:

Robert, I couldn't agree with you more.

Scott has found that the head isn't as flat as it was a few hundred miles back & that the two "rod problem" cylinders are quite badly scored... however, Ross & he reckon/hope/pray that I should be able to limp over the Rockies and up to the coast if I take it eeeeasy.

New rod & ancillary bits should be here on Wednesday.

Gustaf: I'm ashamed to confess my wife & I very much enjoyed our boring drive in a rental car today round Yellowstone (& the rather underwhelming eclipse)!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 11:00 pm:

Hey Tim, I think that we enjoy your T travels more than the rental, and I do not see any photographic evidence of fun in the rental. While you seem to be apprehensive in the photo before the bullseye ranch photo, you wife seems to be enjoying the trip, with a very beautiful smile to confirm it. What route are you planing through Idaho?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:18 am:

Tim,
About what is your speed as you travel along? Yes, I understand that there are some occasional rather fast speeds...would you say 45 - 50 mph (or more),
but more importantly, what is your "average" sustained speed for 1/2 hour or so?

Do you drive a continuous 35 mph, or is it more like 50 mph?

Just curious...I know Dean Y. journeys extensively, and he sometimes does repairs while on the road, but I don't remember him stating that he goes thru rod babbit that frequently.

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:32 am:

If I recall, Dean did have to replace a rod during one of his trips a couple of years ago (he carries a spare, already shimmed and ready). Based on his Facebook posts, Dean's moving average is around 35 mph, with occasional excursions over 50 on downhill stretches. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 12:03 pm:

I , too, was wondering about excessive speed being a contributing factor to both the engine and front end problems. Lot to be said for 30-35 mph. Hoping it goes well from here on and really enjoy the updates. Thanks for posting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 12:14 pm:

Why would a person attempt this type of endeavor without carrying even basic spare parts? He is very fortunate to have run across willing individuals with knowledge of these cars to bail him out. Otherwise, this "adventure" would have ended several weeks ago. Let's hope that he does not become a member of the two-piece crankshaft club in the coming days.

I sincerely hope that no one gets hurt before this is over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

Why would a person make a post like that? Jeez, Man. He's a VERY new T owner. Learning as he goes. Give him a break!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:00 pm:

These posts from Tim Moore about his adventure have been GREAT - easily the most entertaining threads that have appeared on this place in a long time (and I've been on & off this site for over a decade). His descriptions of the assistance he has received from "T people" and "non-T people" along the way have also done a lot to restore my faith in folks out there.

Well, at least we got to Part IV of this fantastic journey before someone tried to rain on the parade with a snarky post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:04 pm:

In case you haven't realized Mike H, he is writing a travel book. There would be no book without these setbacks along the way. As Ron posted above, it's because he is doing it in a T, help will pretty much be everywhere along his route and I too enjoy every post :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:05 pm:

Yes, this is adventure in its truest form. When I read along I am "on the road" along with him. Excellent stuff and what Model T's were and still are about!

P.S. Absolutely love the picture of guy with the samurai sword! That must have been one interesting evening! Reminds me of having met a voodoo priestess while broke down in downtown Detroit. Worth every bit of the inconvenience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:06 pm:

That's it...stick your collective heads in the sand and interpret it through your inherent negativity. On second thought, whatever...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:17 pm:

There's only been one post on these threads thus far that has displayed any "inherent negativity." Perhaps that individual should stick a completely rebuilt Model T engine in the back seat of his touring car (to be prudent - just in case) and embark on that great and potentially treacherous 3.2 mile (round trip) journey to the local ice cream shop he's been planning in grotesque detail for months.

Utter nonsense.

(Message edited by Conversiont on August 22, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:39 pm:

Tim Moore - you're doing exactly what Mr. Ford intended for people to do with a Model T:

"I will build a motor car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family but small enough for the individual to run and care for...... and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in Godís great open spaces."


Godspeed and keep the updates coming!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 01:46 pm:

Mike,

One might wonder where you have stuck your head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 02:11 pm:

Mike H has his legitimate concerns but I prefer to look on the brighter side. Name another century-old car that has the community and the support to drive across a continent with zero prior connections or experience. To me that's the real story here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 02:21 pm:

Y'alls getting into a tissy over this adventure.

Yes, maybe we've had made better preparations for such a trip. We don't know what the internal condition of this engine and car was in before it started but this was the joy and purpose of the trip in this car. If there were no breakdowns there would be nothing to write about.

I was concerned about some of the issues Tim experienced at the start and thought a closer inspection of the car may have been in order before departing on such a trip.

Carry more spares? Mike, a person needs to know what to do with them or they are just extra weight.

If the car was in great mechanical condition an average speed of 35 would not be unreasonable for surfaced roads. Maybe a bit too fast for the condition of Tim's car.

In any case, We're having a fun time reading so far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 02:28 pm:

The concerns were so legitimate that he deleted his profile immediately after advising us to stick our heads somewhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 03:00 pm:

Wow, sorry to have catalysed this to-do! I should stress that Ross supplied me with tools and basic spares at the start, though clearly that didn't extend to parts like starter motors and connecting rods.

I have indeed relied upon the support of forum members and passers by throughout the trip. All I can say is that I'm enduringly grateful for the ongoing help & generosity.

I'll toast you all - even Mike! - if/when I hit the west coast.

P.S. I cut my cruising speed to 35 a couple of thousand miles back, and will henceforth stick to 30!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 03:58 pm:

Tim,

You had nothing "to-do" with it. Keep up your reports and stay safe. It's a great thing you're doing! Wish I was there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 04:34 pm:

I agree. Rock on Tim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 04:52 pm:

Thanks for the information, Tim (as well as your continuous travelogue)!

The reason I asked the speed question is because I have a 102 year old touring that runs along quite nicely at 30....when I push it, and try to keep up with the faster cars, it does not like that!

I'd like to continue enjoying it for a few more miles before I have to "get out and get under" to fix something.

Just wondering if I was being too wimpy or sissified about not wanting to be in the fast lane.

Enjoy...there really are some wonderful people in this country, aren't there?

Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Nikolajevs Dearborn, MI on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 06:54 pm:

I for one am happy to have been part of the adventure. As I told Tim in an email, I've seen a glimpse of the future when my kids start driving. Every night since we replaced the #2 rod I've looked for his posts to make sure all is well. What stinks is now that he's further west they are often past my bedtime. :-)

The babbitt was quite porous on the #2 rod and I suspect the same on #3. I guarantee Murphy's law will kick in and if Tim gets a spare he will not have any more rod failures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 08:50 pm:

From another "Tim Moore";

This is so fun to watch and you are doing fine...I believe that the car will be in better condition when you finish than when you started because you actually shook all the bugs out and worked it to find weak points.

Most of these cars get "rebuilt" and sit and polished then sometimes a little trip but never like they were built to use. That is fine but what you are doing will show what a work horse they really are.

Don't worry about the problems that can be fixed as you travel but stay safe and don't take chances...the other drivers on the road are who are not safe and you are in not much more than a fast tractor.

Stay safe first and please continue to post progress,

The other "Tim Moore".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 08:56 pm:

Well, Peter, Tim's getting a new #3 rod.

#1 and #4 still appear quite tight, but #2 is nearing looseness again and I will be plastigaged to see where it's at. Fingers crossed that it is still in a range that I can send him out with confidence.

#3 crank throw miked at 1.235...do you remember what #2 throw miked at? Have not pulled that cap until I am sure I have those special bolts in hand to replace...

thanks

scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Nikolajevs Dearborn, MI on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

Sorry Scott. I do not recall. It was ten minutes to five and we wanted to get a call into one of the suppliers before they closed. I should have written it down... :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 09:47 pm:

no worries :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 10:28 am:

Tim, as we like to say here in the U.S.,

YOU ARE THE MAN!!!!

Count me as one of the (gentle) skeptics on your original post but I have to commend you on your adventure. My other hobby is riding adventure touring motorcycles. In fact I am in the middle of a trip to Alaska as I write this. The goal for my friend and I is to avoid paved roads as much as possible and we ride motorcycles that have the capability for handling that.

Inevitably, things break, the bikes need maintenance, and sometimes as happened two days ago a bike goes down while crossing a remote mountain stream getting everything wet. But as my friend constantly reminds me, the things that go wrong are part of the adventure. As you have shown, you get to meet new people along the way, and have your faith in humanity restored to some degree.

Thanks for bringing some fresh excitement to this forum which is already a very good one. Best of luck to you on the rest of your journey. I'm now inspired to do something similar in one of my T's.

Cheers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 12:14 am:

Just askin' are you considering coming through Seattle? If so we will leave the latch key out and the light on for you.

You have a place to stay and a well equipped shop at your disposal, plus 2 really good model t experts.

Seattle is just at 90 miles south of Vancouver Canada which is an incredible city to visit. Also, Seattle is a 2 hour boat ride from Victoria Canada.

Well worth considering,

brasscarguy@comcast.net(Seattle)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Reed on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 07:33 am:

Thanks Tim for the insight into your adventure. I read the updates every evening. One thing you may not know is you are an inspiration to all of us. Because of your journey you have inspired me to take my 1931 sedan for a short run from the Pacific to the Atlantic and then back to the Pacific. A friend of fifty years will be going along as a co-pilot. We are both 69 years young and have been lifetime model t and A lovers. We plan on leaving mid-September. Continue the great posts and Godspeed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 07:42 am:

I don't remember my exact words when Tim first came on the forum and was asking about doing this. I think I probably doubted the prudence of doing it in a new (to him), unknown car. And a lot of the things that could happen, have happened. However, it would appear that Tim is of the type that doesn't let such things get in his way. Admirable, indeed.

Looking forward to reading the book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 08:29 am:

Larry - a lot of us on here own both Ts and As. I hope when you make that trip in mid-September, you'll keep us posted on how it's going like Tim!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 02:02 pm:

Hal - "Admirable" for sure! Had Tim lived a couple hundred years ago, he'd have made a darn good "pioneer", huh?

"Westward ho", and all that! (:^) .... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Brintnall on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 02:28 pm:

Tim: I continue to enjoy your adventure and look forward to the days adventure. I hope this is your last major repair. Allen So.W. Mo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 02:57 pm:

Time for C2C V


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 04:00 pm:

Wasn't that a car built for years by Citroen?
(Not quite, but almost.)

Don't mind me. Snidely strikes again.


Keep up the good adventure Tim Moore (whichever one, or both for that matter). A lot of us here are enjoying your trip. I hope I can manage to do something like that yet in my life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 02:22 am:

Some very heartwarming posts up there, thanks all. Larry - that's great, best of luck. You too, Gary. To be honest Harold I'd have been a rubbish pioneer unless there were better pioneers strung out along the trail ahead of me ready to help out. Go Tim Moores!

And Brass Car Guy - careful what you wish for, as I'm now planning to hit Seattle in order to ship the car home!

Anyway, I've been enjoying a T-free holiday with my wife around Yellowstone (she left today, sob), and came back to Scott's to find he'd lavished meticulous hours on the car, Emory-papering the crank to within a thousandth of true, cleaning/replacing pan & head bolts, flattening the pan, scraping crud off the head (which is now acceptably flat but has a tiny corrosion-related leak at the front. Not much to be done about the pretty deep scoring we found in 2&3 cylinders (wrist pin related). He shimmed Ross's new rod in with great precision, then we put everything back. Fired up: no discernable knocks or too much oil smoke, but a fearsome racket from the blown muffler, which was clearly being drowned out by rival noises before. Scott seems to think I have a reasonable chance of making it if I change the oil every 500 miles and stick to 30. We celebrated with a drive in his all-iron 19 roadster - less power, but so much tighter and smoother than mine (with 5,000 hard miles under its wheels). We also moved the damper d-link a little away from the tie-rod weld.
Tomorrow - up to 8400 ft & the Continental Divide... Now enjoying another well-fed night with the estimable Scott & Althea. Epic views, hospitality and mechanical finesse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 04:02 am:

Clean & organized shop is appreciated. Looks like a bolt-hole to thousandths conversion chart too, on the stud.
Vern


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J. Marino - League City, Texas on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 10:45 am:

are those your rear axles on the work bench?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 11:17 am:

No, those rear axles are part of my Ruckstell build...just finished teardown/clean-up phase when Tim arrived...his axle is still firmly planted under him! We saw him off in good style this AM. He's headed through Yellowstone and on to Idaho. We wish him luck! Great guy and wonderful guest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 02:00 pm:

Tim getting into the thick of things...

on the road again...

with a whole lot of nothing between here and Yellowstone...

Safe journeys Tim...enjoyed you and your wife's company!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

Thanks again, Scott. You can just make out my trail of bereft tears in that last photo!

NEW THREAD!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Saturday, August 26, 2017 - 12:17 am:

Hat's off to all who have assisted Tim, well done - great club. Good luck Tim, great fun reading along


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