1919-1920 Runabout w/Replacement Engine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 1919-1920 Runabout w/Replacement Engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 09:51 am:

Working on getting this Texas barn find running for a friend. It has been subjected to a number of modifications over the years, including a replacement engine. According to what I can find, the motor number date is August, 1928.



The overall condition of the sheet metal is surprisingly good. It is surface rust only, with no rust through that I see so far. I'll post progress reports.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:16 am:

That is an interesting engine number indeed. It is the typical number stamps that Ford used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 04:35 pm:

The stamp pad on the block is 1926-1927 style, so it is likely a Ford replacement engine, not just a block only, as bare blocks were sold without serial number. That engine was factory built and sold as complete assembly in 1928, as Ford was still taking care of the Model T parts needs then.



1927 engine serial number on 1927 block.

That runabout pickup looks like a great start for a 'running' barn find to me! Like the accessory running board rack too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 09:52 am:

Dan,
I think you are correct about it being a factory built engine, as it has the four dip pan and the late (last) model hogshead and pedals.



Also, how about this creative muffler wrap treatment?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:50 pm:

As near as I can tell, the car was last licensed in 1953.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 04:53 pm:

RANDY, the barns here in Vermont used to have those tucked away in them too. and there may still be one or two, but getting very hard to find one these days. ladder rack tells me she was a helper on many a job. very nice.thank you for sharing.GREG.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

Fresh oil, fresh gas, rebuilt radiator, rebuilt carb, overhauled coil box and switch, new wires, new 8 volt battery, fresh starter, tighten the bands, add water and viola!! She fired right up!

It is truly amazing how resilient these old Fords are!

The next step will be installation of four new tires. Then comes the test drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 04:58 pm:

That is absolutely charming right down to the Mobile Oil Muffler. Gargoyle I suspect. Where else would we see something that wonderful but here?
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 07:33 pm:

OH MAN!

Randy, that car is TOO COOL. Please, please, please, photograph the heck out of it and post them here. That "cargo" box on the back is especially interesting, to me, anyways.

The muffler wrap is wonderful and I Love the headlamp "eyebrows".

Good luck with your project, Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F Stephens-Marcle on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 05:33 pm:

I agree with many others, you have a delightful piece of history there, and while it is tempting to restore, if I were lucking to find such a treasure, I would replace only what is necessary to make it road worthy....folks will be drawn to this time capsule far more than the 100 point restorations....I know I am, because this shows them as they were truly utilized in their later years...the stories this magnificent machine will bring forth, PRICELESS....and what ever you do KEEP that muffler as is, heck I would put mirrors on the ground to highlight it!!! heck, I'm half tempted to recreate a "fix" just like it! a keeper


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 05:52 pm:

You're right about the production date of August 1928. Apparently you can go to Detroit and look up the exact day. Bruce says, "Daily production figures continue in the factory records but only the monthly production is shown here [in the encyclopedia] after June 1927."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 05:56 pm:

Very nice find, like my 18 it would be better to keep it like it is. Wonder what the true year is?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 06:10 pm:

Wonderful to behold. I hope it will be kept in "as found" condition, just make her mechanically sound. Like Bill, I hope you will post close up pix of the "cargo box" ! Thanks much for sharing this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 06:19 pm:

Thank you for your encouragement! I wholeheartedly agree and have done my best to keep things intact as they were found. Minus the rodent offerings, of course.

What is most amazing to me is how smoothly this old engine runs and idles.

The car must have been used as a daily work vehicle of a sign painter or house painter. There are ladder racks on the top of each fender and what little paint color that remains appears to have been house paint, carefully applied.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 08:53 pm:

Thanks for the pictures Randy !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 08:57 pm:

That is a really cool "rumble seat" !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 10:51 am:

Interesting developments on Ronny's barn find. Closer examination of the "rumble seat" area revealed a small compartment, with an envelope inside containing WWII ration stamps. The ration book identifies the owner as H. A. Reissig of Austin Texas and the car as a 1919 Ford.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 11:01 am:

A fresh set of transmission bands and 4 new tires and tubes, and this old girl now moves on down the road!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 11:03 am:

Maybe Reissig Builders would like to see their truck?

https://www.mapquest.com/us/texas/reissig-builders-351127682


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 11:06 am:

Cool and cool, thanks for the update.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 11:21 am:

Jerry,
I did a search of that name and came up with their info as well. I plan to get in touch with them, as your hunch is probably on the mark. It is a pretty unique name and being from the Austin area makes it very likely.
Thanks for posting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 11:30 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Weaver on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

Well, Doing a search on Ancestory, it seems that Mr. Herman Adolph Reissig was born 26 Nov 1887in Round Rock, TX and died 25 Sep 1953. That's probably the reason it was last registered in 1953. Neat that you found his information. - Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Friday, October 13, 2017 - 07:12 pm:

Matt,
You are quite the detective! I will pass the information along.
Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 12:33 am:

Interesting that it has "natural" spokes. I know they were an option, and it's a fad now for everybody and his brother to have them, but judging by old photos I think they were uncommon in the Model T era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 08:16 am:

Steve,
Actually what appears to be natural spokes is the old red house paint flaking off and exposing the bare wood. I will try to add some close up pics soon. The majority of the sheet metal (and the wheels) was painted red, now long since faded and flaking off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 06:59 pm:

Just to needle you a bit Steve. :-) Please, no offense actually intended.
Perhaps not that common then but us "natural spoke-folk" have been around forever.
Bwahahahaha!
Wait a minute! My brother knows nothing about wooden spokes... ;-) Good carpenter but he has no clue of this stuff...
Hmmm, I'll have to look at the 28 Plymouth my BIL bought for my sister. Those spokes too MAY be bare...
Hehehehe! Sorry.
:-)
Randy, such a great piece to be playing with! Thank you for sharing with us!

Shoot! I forget that I have a 28 replacement engine here too! Now I gotta go look at the number after the rain stops. :-)

(Message edited by Duey_C on October 14, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 08:16 pm:

This is a family forum -
It is bad enough you are talking about bare spokes,
posting pictures is going too far!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 03:36 am:

Be sure to take the rear end apart and replace the Babbitt thrust washers!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 08:01 am:

A close up of the wheel reveals a more "unnatural" appearance. From a short distance, the faded red paint just gives it a "bare" look. ;>)



You can see traces of the original black paint on the spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 09:44 am:

Randy, Looks as if you will be on a quest to find some period wooden ladders!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 11:01 am:

Very nice, can you post photos of the dash, interior?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 11:30 am:

Marvelous car...and the developing story/history are terrific!


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