Gas

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Gas
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe gallagher on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 01:15 am:

Is it ok to use todays regular gas (unleaded) in a Model T ....will it do any damage ?? ... Thanks Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 01:37 am:

What else can you put in your tank?
All gasoline in the U.S. is unleaded?
In the model
T days there was no lead in the gas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Harms - Sacramento County, CA on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 03:32 am:

https://modeltfordfix.com/what-kind-of-gasoline-should-i-use-in-my-model-t-ford/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 08:58 am:

One of my favorite bits of stupid advertising was for a Model T "remachined to run on unleaded fuel". It came from the factory running on unleaded fuel, because that's all there was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 09:16 am:

It's amazing how many times at the gas station "Model T show" people can't believe that we can put unleaded in such an old car. When I politely explain to them the advent of leaded fuel, they all give an "ohhh, yeah, never thought of that" or something similar!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 09:24 am:

Nope, Been running my 19 on the ethanol blended fuels with no additives for many years. Now, That said a long time ago I did notice some wear in my brass carburetor so I switched over to a new reproduction NH carburetor I bought off Synders and haven't had a moments trouble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 10:34 am:

Out of curiosity Will, what sort of wear did that gas cause ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 10:48 am:

If your area gas stations offer non-ethanol fuel stick with that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:13 am:

During WWII and gas rationing there were "Wood Gas" Generators and your car could be powered by heating wood till it started to "OFF GAS" and you could burn that not as much power as Gasoline but 10 MPH is better than dragging a wagon to market.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:16 am:

forgot this link
https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=model+t+burning+wood+gas&pc=MOZI&ru=%2fsear ch%3fq%3dmodel%2bt%2bburning%2bwood%2bgas%26pc%3dMOZI%26form%3dMOZSBR&view=detai l&mmscn=vwrc&mid=133AC2A3FA9B7C4A8E5A133AC2A3FA9B7C4A8E5A&FORM=WRVORC


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:32 am:

Trouble with wood gas is you'd get about 16hp out of a T. Neat concept though and while not period-correct, the FEMA-style generator looks dead simple.

Back to the OP, my T has premium unleaded in it right now since I don't run it a lot and in that case my preference is for ethanol-free. I intend to switch to the cheap unleaded next summer when I plan to run the thing all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 01:07 pm:

Correct me if I am wrong ---

Some time between 1915 and 1920 the quality of gasoline (petrol) changed. From the period literature - pre ethyl - gasoline - the by-product of kerosene production was a purer lighter gasoline. There was less kerosene in the gasoline. The period text describes it as going from a lighter gasoline to a heavier gasoline - more by-products of kerosene in the mix. Has any one found modified carburetors that were machined to accept the new gasoline blend? From a 1921 text there is a description of a modified Holley carburetor. This modification was accomplished by opening up the mixing tube from 13/16 inch to 23/32 inch. This machining was to allow the newer and heavier gasoline to mix with air better for better mileage and power.

I believe light gasoline is described as light naphtha.
http://www.collectioncare.org/MSDS/naphthamsds.pdf

I am skeptical that the E15 gasoline will affect the metal of a Model T carburetor, as most are cast iron or brass. Until the late 1920-ealy 1930, lead of some form was introduced to gasoline to control combustion. Again when the Model T was phased out there was only unleaded petrol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 03:22 pm:

George John,

Did you mean "opening" from 23/32 to 13/16? 13/16 = 26/32, so it would be bigger than 23/32.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 05:46 pm:

Roar Sand

From the original source - Automobile Engineering.Vol. 6. page 71. 1921. "Ford Construction and Repair."

Text Reads, "This mixing tube, figure 54, can be replaced with a tube 23/32 inch in diameter at the throat for proper mixing of present heavy fuels."

Illustration 54 shows the old size as 13/16 inches, with the new diameter of 23/32 inches.

So corrected -
"This modification was accomplished by opening up the mixing tube from 13/16 inch to 23/32 inch. This machining was to allow the newer and heavier gasoline to mix with air better for better mileage and power."


I could take responsibility for the error, but it is easier to state that it was the action of the computer's analogue for sequential numbers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 06:30 pm:

George wrote.
"Lead of some form was introduced to gasoline to control combustion"

I have, and could take some time to find it in my research notes, the reason of the original intent of lead in fuel, the combustion side of it came later by a bit of a luck.

Lead was one of the many additives used and tried to prevent aviation fuel from freezing while flying in WW1 years, lead being the cheapest but not the best won out, then as time and formulas perfected, that it was found to enhance the performance of the internal combustion engine, ie, eliminated pre ignition, higher compression, higher revs, advancing timing, more power etc and the list go's on.

That's why avgas still has lead in it.
Just a side note, the best additive was platinum but to costly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 07:25 pm:

Frank van Ekeren

A site you may want to review:

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930091076

Example of found articles from 1920 - "Power characteristics of fuels for aircraft engines."

"A new process for the production of aircraft-engine fuels"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 08:05 pm:

I agree with the history buffs on the origin of lead in the gas. However, in the present tense, the use of ethanol was not included in the pre-leaded and leaded days. It is the use of ethanol that I think can cause fuel problems, not the use pure unleaded/leaded gas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 08:28 pm:

Interesting read George, I like the even by 1918 that aviation fuel had it's own classification of "Fighters Fuel"


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