Chamois ??????

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Chamois ??????
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Goddard NJ on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 03:07 pm:

Sorry fellas,
I am reading about Chamois drying off your Ts.
What is it and where can I get 1. Any special
kind., Brand Etc..
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 03:13 pm:

Sheep skin, lots of imitations, the only thing I know of that will strain water out of gasoline. A good detail shop should be able to fix you up. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Govoni on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 03:15 pm:

It's a cloth. I real one I think is made of soft leather. If you have a fresh paint job I wouldn't use it. Get a micro fiber towel. The Chamois can be used to dry than wring it out and use it again. Wal-Mart will have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 03:19 pm:

Google again...

Chamois leather (British pronunciation: /ˈʃmwɑː/[1] or American pronunciation: /ʃmˈwɑː/[1]) is a type of porous leather, traditionally the skin of the chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra), a type of European mountain goat but today it is made almost exclusively from the flesh split of a sheepskin. The leather is favored for its gentle, non-abrasive composition and absorption properties. It has a range of uses:

Gloves in the 19th to the first half of the 20th century
Leather jackets, small bags, and pouches
Polishing cloths for jewels or shoes
Filtering fuel
Automotive drying material that is safe on acrylic, lacquer, enamel, and polyurethane paints and clear-coats
General household cleaning
Orthopedics and other medical uses
Imitation chamois leather is made using other leathers (such as the domestic goat, or pig), and synthetic chamois leather is usually made from polyvinyl alcohol or non-woven viscose rayon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 03:49 pm:

The best I've found is one called The Absorber. Most stores have it. I have two...one just for my Ts & one for the moderns as sometimes that one gets a bit dirty. The Ts don't get that dirty anyway so the risk is low.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 04:00 pm:

Back when Quarter Car Washes started appearing, they had 30 gallon drums with a few chamois skins and a roll ringer at the vacuum islands. They were there to use to dry your car after washing.

Those were the days. You could leave something out and it wouldn't get stolen. :-) And back then a quarter lasted long enough in spray time to actually wash and rinse your car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

I've been using a sheepskin chamois ever since I was a kid for modern and antique cars.

You can buy one at any auto parts store.

http://www.autozone.com/wash-mitts-chamois-and-other-wash-and-wax-accessories/mi crofiber-cloths-chamois-and-applicators/tanner-s-select-5-sq-ft-natural-chamois/ 135038_0_0

A natural chamois will last for years if you keep it clean and take care of it.

Do not use a chamois for washing/removing dirt. Only for drying and preventing water spotting.

Use it as a final step, after the car has been thoroughly cleaned and rinsed off.

Rinse the chamois in clean water and then thoroughly wring it out. Then wipe off/dry off the car with it. Rinse and wring it out as you go a long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Goddard NJ on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 07:18 pm:

Great info from everyone. I will pick up tomorrow.
Cheers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 08:28 pm:

RE;"Rinse the chamois in clean water and then thoroughly wring it out"
That is the important thing to remember, they do not work when dry they have to be moist to work. Dry they just move the water around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 10:44 pm:

I use the Absorber on all my cars. Rinse when done, wring it out and put back in it tube while still wet. They do suck up the water


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Friday, August 18, 2017 - 11:27 pm:

It's an animal that runs around the mountains here in New Zealand. Most good quality Chamois are made out of the skins of lambs that don't make it at lambing time. Never buy a synthetic Chamois. They are a waste of time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 12:37 am:


It's a little awkward to wipe your car with it, but I'm told it really sops up the water.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 02:13 am:

I used one for years until I realized that my hand held leaf blower does the job with no hand wringing and no fear that it could scratch. When Arthur starts to effect your hands, wringing it out sometimes is difficult.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 04:24 am:

Steve - I hadn't seen that style before. I really like how they made the horns closer together and curved at the ends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 06:13 am:

Good one Steve. I learned an expensive lesson with a genuine chamois. My wife put mine in the washing machine and the drier. The machine wash would probably have been ok, but the drier ruined it. Turns out fabric softener ruins it.
Afterwards it would only push water around.It would not pick it up at all. If you even put one in a drier that has had a fabric softener sheet in it before, same effect, even if you don't put a sheet in with it. Lesson learned.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 06:44 am:

I also use The Absorber. I have had it for easily 20 years. Works great, machine washable. I don't use it on my T though, as I would hate to wipe the patina and rust off with it :-). I used it on my muscle cars way back when and still on my current drivers though.

http://www.cleantools.net/products/absorber


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 08:22 am:

We just use a old bath towel.I haven't seen a chamois used in years.I'll bet it's hard to rung out the one pictured!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 08:42 am:

Years ago, in the Blue Field ( that is how long I am talking) he guy next to me sold Chamois. That was all he sold. People came to see him each year to stock up. He sold out each year. He said that chamois sold in the US is deer skin, not from a sheep. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 10:17 am:

Chamois leather can be the hide of a chamois, deer, goat, or sheep.

I would think that sheep would be most common (availability and probably lower cost to make).

From Wikipedia:

"The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a species of goat-antelope native to mountains in Europe, including the European Alps, the Pyrenees, the Carpathians, the Tatra Mountains, the Balkans, parts of Turkey, the Caucasus, and the Apennines.[2] The chamois has also been introduced to the South Island of New Zealand. Some subspecies of chamois are strictly protected in the EU under the European Habitats Directive."

"Chamois leather, traditionally made from the hide of the chamois, is very smooth and absorbent and is favoured in cleaning, buffing, and polishing because it produces no scratching. Modern chamois leather may be made from chamois hides, but hides of deer or domestic goats or sheep are commonly used."

I have a brand new, unused chamois in its original package that I recently picked up from an estate sale for $1.00.

I would say it is a least 40 years old because there is no barcode on the package.

It is from S.M. Incorporated - Manufacturer - Importer - Exporter, St. Louis, MO.

Package says "A Chamois is the Inner split of a sheep skin."

The Chamois itself is stamped "Genuine Chamois Made in Belgium."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 06:53 am:

Steve Jelf the horns are a great help when working in the corners....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Monday, August 21, 2017 - 11:31 am:

I had one (chamois) which I have used for over 40+ years and it worked great. The last time I saw it was in Whitefish last month after I wiped the T off at the show. Hope someone found it and is still using it. My new one cost a lot more but they are the best as they will last a long time.


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