Metal in engine oil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Metal in engine oil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Robinson on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 01:29 pm:

On changing my oil (annually) I have regularly found a minor amount of fine metal on the magnetic drain plug, an amount that never really concerned me. This change there was at least a 1/4 tsp actually domed on the plug. If I assume this is not bearing material where does this normally come from and should I be looking into a tear down?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 01:36 pm:

Kind of normal. Depending on how much driving you do "annually", you might consider changing your oil more frequently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 03:01 pm:

Bearing material (Babbitt) is not magnetic so you would see flakes in the oil if that were the case! Rings scraping the walls of the cylinders should be the only source of fuzz on the magnetic plug a little fuzz is to be expected, if it gets to 1/2 teaspoon in normal driving conditions and you change your oil every 500 - 700 miles I would pull the head just to have a look see. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 03:06 pm:

I'm guessing something to do with the triple gears, based on all of the growling and grinding noise they make, which is considered "normal"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Robinson on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 03:14 pm:

oil probably had 400-500 miles on it. I see on the forum that wrist pins do come loose. If a pin was loose how soon would you see compression loss in one cylinder?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 03:16 pm:

If a pin was loose could you not get a look at any scoring from underneath? Might be easier than pulling the head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 04:57 pm:

My car has been doing that since the day I bought it seven years ago. -It's normal. -Ignore it. -Forget about it. -Follow the following rules:

If it's loose, tighten it;
if it creaks, oil it;
if it squeaks, grease it;
if it scrapes, shim it;
if it rattles, adjust it;
if it's wet, wipe it;
if it's dry, polish it;
if it drips... Oh—No, that's normal; leave that alone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 05:06 pm:

If there is an unusual uptick in accumulation it should not be ignored.

Something that will make a lot of material quickly without affecting engine performance, and not always making noise, is something scraping a transmission drum -- incorrect steel rivets used on the band lining, the steel band contacting the drum, etc. Easy enough to check.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 07:02 pm:

John,

You'd see lots of oil burning before you'd see compression loss if a wrist pin hit your cylinder wall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 07:13 pm:

I always see a little when I change the oil on mine but seems to be the same amount. I change oil in my T s every 500 miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 10:49 pm:

The wrist pin is captured by the pinch bolt. That bolt would have to be completely missing for the wrist pin to move over enough enough to hit the cylinder wall. On the other hand, losing Babbitt out of the rod bearing may/will allow the rod to tilt or slide fore/aft enough for the wrist-pin to kiss the cylinder wall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, August 25, 2017 - 10:58 pm:

This engine had two rods let go (badly) and scored both cylinder walls. Amazingly, this car smokes only upon start up, though it does consume oil (though not any more than what is generally normal for a car driven hard).

I would have believed it would smoke like a bandit if I saw the picture here and had not seen it drive away smoke free once new rod was installed.

There are very few hard and fast rules for Model T's


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