OT-Hurricanes and Pandamonium

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT-Hurricanes and Pandamonium
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 07:46 am:

If I lived in FL, I'd be looking to get out too. My Mama and Sister and her family live in the Western panhandle. It's looking like it won't go there. The news this morning showed people lined up around the block to get gas (Miami, I'm guessing?). Not sure if the station wasn't open yet, or they were out of gas, or if that was just how long it takes to get through the line. I live probably 100 miles inland from the Atlantic coast, but commute to just outside Savannah every day. I fill up every two days. This morning, I went to fill up and my usual station was out of 87 and 89. And that's in my town, 100 miles inland. They don't know when they will get any more. I filled up with 93. Bad thing is, our other two modern vehicles are both close to E. Hopefully, my wife can get at least one of them filled up today. No telling what's gonna happen. We're probably not going to see any flooding in our area, but you never know if you might loose power. Everyone in Savannah is worried. A co-worker told me yesterday that several grocery stores were already out of bread and peanut butter and jelly. I-95, for the couple of miles I travel on it every day, was way busier than normal this morning. I'm sure it was mostly Floridians leaving Dodge. People here are concerned about the roads being jammed with Floridians if Georgians need to evacuate. Surprisingly, I-16 West didn't look crowded at all this morning. Everyone just seemed to be headed North. I have gas to get to work tomorrow. Monday? Who knows?

Oh well, I've rambled enough. Hope the Floridians get out. Hope the run on gas and PB&J sandwiches in our area turns out to be hysteria.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 08:06 am:

Hal,

If you are not gone by now - you are most likely staying put.

I have been texting Robert in Miami - he has a whole house generator but can't get propane until Friday.

Will in West Melbourne is probably already on the road.

FreighTer Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 08:48 am:

The weather prognosticators have been whipping people into a frenzy of the sky is falling for 2 weeks now and are telling the people of Florida and S/E Georgia see what happened to Houston, your next! If you know what your flood zone is and look at all of the tracks we won't know until Friday afternoon what it's going to do. Certainly if you live in south Florida Secure everything and leave, IF you are somewhere north of I-4 wait and see If you are west of I-75 and north of I-4 pray for everyone else more than that we cannot ask. I guess to get really excited I need a smaller glass mine is still half empty!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 08:48 am:

I'm blaming the dang news for scaring everybody. The next few days before the storm gets here are going to be a disaster. I have been in the Keys for a while and when a storm comes we "have it together" the day before the boats are moved/tied up and shutters go up. People then leave or stay and wait out the storm. This time is different.

Last weekend was a holiday weekend and we had a large amount of traffic. Starting the scare over the weekend many filled up theie cars and boats on the way out of town. Advance to 2 days ago, and we have many driving down to the keys to check on homes etc. Meanwhile the fuel stations took another hard hit. We arent expecting the storm for another 3 days and every station is out of gas, this is when most conchs start prep. This is the first time I have seen stations run out thru many scares/storms.

The other night there were 4 "bullet points" that were being talked about.
1. A major storm/impact is likely
2. Nothing can be ruled out from Texas to Maine
3. It may miss the US completly
4. Get ready

This is nothing but creating fear. In my mind if you can't tell people where to evacuate to you should tell them to find a safe place. Now don't get me wrong evacuations are good and needed. Take us, with what they are forcasting for the storm and reporting we should head to say maybe Kansas? Good luck getting gas though.

As far as forcasting on the news I have recorded and fast forwarded to try to see the various models and tracks (not cone) for hours with no luck. Often a single model is referenced and only a single model within the cone. This benifits to scare everybody in the cone. If they would show all the models where you could see them then it would be good to determine the certanity and how they agree.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 09:06 am:

The weather people have no credibility anymore. It might have been an inaccurate science that people gave them a hard time about before, but now every season it is just a bunch of "sky is falling" hype without even making an attempt to be correct.

Every winter here, "It's going to be the biggest snow on record, up to the eaves of your house, be prepared to be trapped inside for two weeks" and when you wake up the next morning and it's a dusting that you can clean off with a push broom they've become even more of a joke. Using an, "even a blind squirrel gets a nut once in awhile" mentality for forecasting is not responsible because after awhile people are going to split to the two extremes of not listening at all and just plain freaking out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 09:15 am:

Here ya go...
Models


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 09:22 am:

Chadwick take a gander at these links
http://www.weathernerds.org/tc_guidance/images/AL11_2017090700_ECENS.png?8695221
http://spaghettimodels.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 09:37 am:

The weather stations exist for one reason and one reason only and that is to sell advertising. They intentionally create negative hype because people are naturally drawn to such drama and the more people they can get to tune in the more they can charge for advertising- it's that simple.

The majority of the country experiences fine weather the majority of the time but if the weather stations reported on this nobody would tune in thus driving down advertising dollars.

It's the same for "news" stations. There is way more good going on most of the time in our country but if stations only reported on the positive nobody would tune in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 10:11 am:

Dammed if you do or dammed if you don't warn-----did the extra three feet on your foundation help save your home?

The first thing I check every morning is the weather----its amazing how close hour by hour its dead on with temperature on my PC in our area.

Our issue now is forest fires----smoke is moving all the way from central Oregon to the coast. 7AM here I cant see the sun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 10:35 am:

There was some dumb ass 20 something chick on FaceBook all last week running her mouth that Houston had been hit so hard to punish Texas for all the Nazis that voted for Trump.
Wonder what she is spouting off about now. She lives in Florida. I am just amazed at the stupidity going around these days.
Don't even get me started on those of us that live in Hurricane zones but never seem to keep a extra case of water or jar of peanut butter on the shelf. As a first grader I lived through Hurricane Carla and experienced 2 weeks without electricity. My Dad was the only one on the block with a chain saw and we had our street cleared of trees in a half a day and cooked on a Coleman camping stove just fine. Today many think they can make it through a huge storm with a app. on their phone! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 11:59 am:

I currently have three 5000 to 7000 watt generators, all working all picked up for under $200 after hurricane near misses in the past. People buy them put fuel in them then they don't lose power and realise they don't have room to store it until the next storm, the market gets flooded with generators and the price drops quick, if I can get up to 15 generators I will start a company that rents them for hurricanes. I'm thinking $15 per day plus fuel and oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 12:11 pm:

I've long ago, all but quit watching T.V. "News"! The little that they talk about and try to "dramamatize" (sp?) between commercials is usually not really "news" at all, and a lot of it is just "made-up" hype that as others here have said, is mostly to sell advertising and compete with other T.V. networks for "ratings"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

Having extra food and a generator is part of life in cold areas to. Tornado or snow storm could shut things down for a few days. All the warnings they put out if it gets cloudy is crying wolf here. We all know that story. Forest fires are a different story. News makes it worse by far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 12:28 pm:

Well, all the hype has resulted in at least one day off. No work tomorrow. Maybe not Monday, either. Have to wait and see. I think it all comes down to seeing one politician be a few hours slow to react to something that caught everyone by surprise. He gets lambasted and looses re-election. Now, NO ONE wants THAT to happen to THEM, so they err on the side of caution. If they were right, re-election is shoe in. If they were wrong, well, at least they had the public's best interest in mind, right? I mean, you can NEVER be TOO careful, right? Crying "Wolf" comes to mind. Not sure how they'll ever come to a balance. If nothing else, it makes people want to depend on the government, and that's what it's REALLY all about anyway, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 12:47 pm:

And I thought Governor Scott banning the phrases "Global Warming", "Climate Change" and "Sea level rise" from all official Florida Government reports and correspondence would take care of all this...!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 01:24 pm:

In any case I wish all the Florida folks do the best for them selves, friends and family!

Our roll in the hay will be a proven tsunami that can hit anytime. Indians lived through it there was plenty of them when Lewis and Clark came to the pacific ocean. No sun yet! 10-30 AM fog horns are blowing trying to keep fishermen out of the way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 01:30 pm:

I grew up in New Orleans in the '40's and '50's. Weather forecasting wasn't so good then, but we usually had a day or two's warning of a hurricane coming.

The first thing my mother would do is get down on her knees and scrub the bathtub with Comet and then a little Clorox. Then she'd fill it up. This would be our drinking water. Also flushing water.

We always kept a supply of canned soups, and tuna fish, and sardines, and things like that.

We always had an axe in the attic. If you don't know why, you weren't paying attention after Katrina.

We had candles. Our windows had working shutters on them. Most everyone in New Orleans has a boat (car-top or on a trailer) in their yard or garage.

There are no basements in New Orleans. Older homes, like ours, were built about 30 - 36 inches off the ground, mostly for cooling purposes. So we never worried about water in the house.

Of course we lost electricity as soon as the wind picked up. We had a battery-operated radio, and of course one in the car, so who cared? We didn't have air conditioning, and the storm would provide ventilation - even when we were buttoned up.

I can vividly remember at least three times that we went outside and marveled at the calm as the "eye" moved over us. I also remember launching our boat in the street after the storm passed, and paddling around the neighborhood.

Of major concern was street flooding and our cars. We'd park them on high ground of some sort, like the median of a big avenue, and walk home.

All this sufficed for the no-name storms, then Camille and Betsy.

Fast forward. Katrina! This was a whole other thing. Thanks to satellites and all the other forecasting tools, we knew with certainty that was the one we had dreaded all my life. And it did just we knew it would do.

I don't want to belabor the point, but the devastation of New Orleans was NOT caused by Katrina, but by the failure of the U. S. Corps of Engineers' shoddily-built levees, which collapsed the day after the storm had passed.

Now I look at the satellite images of Irma. It's at least as big and bad as Katrina, and maybe worse. I bleed for the folks in its path. Many will die, and many more will be homeless. In fact, as I write this, the images we've received from the islands are heart-rending.

I'm so sorry. I wish there were something we could do. But there isn't, until afterwards, when we can send help for cleanup and re-building.

To anyone in its path who reads this, I have one piece of hard-won advice. If you have time before leaving, empty your refrigerator and freezer and leave them open. And if you didn't do that, when you get home DO NOT open them. Duct-tape them closed, and put them by the curb. DO NOT give in to the temptation to peek inside. It's TOXIC and will make you sick for a week, just by one little sniff.

God bless us all, and keep us safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 02:56 pm:

Peter,

Thank you for your Perspective.

Robert got 300 gallons of propane delivered today in Miami.

I guess he is staying put - he is my friend and I worry about him and his family - but he has lived in Miami for a long time.

I can't reach Will in West Melbourne- guess he is driving north today.

Wishing minimal loss to anyone in the path of Irma.


FreighTer Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 04:01 pm:

Up here in NH our biggest problem is loss of power in the winter closely followed by hurricanes near the seacoast and surprise wind storms.

We heat our home with Propane (Big Tank in the ground) and have a big gas powered generator to run things when the power fails.
This gives us heat, water from the well, power for the refrigerator and freezer, and TV!

I always keep at least 1/2 tank of gas in the cars, 5-10 gallons of extra gas. and the generator full of fresh gas -
I drain and fill the generator at least twice a year.

When we get hit - the biggest problem is usually getting around the downed trees to get gas, but I usually have enough for about 4 days by borrowing from the T and A.
I can stretch it to 6 days if I just concentrate on the refrigerators/freezers, heat in the winter and showers.

There is enough food in the freezers, refrigerator, and basement shelves for about three weeks -maybe 4 of 5.

I think the longest we have been without power has been 4 days but we were able to get gas within two.


I hope the best for those in Texas and in the path of this storm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 07:25 pm:

I'm in Naples. and I would prefer to be back in Boston. The T is secure in the garage, and I am working on hurricane shutters. The gas stations are out, there is no water or propane for sale, so evacuating is not an option. I do not think that the weathercasters are just selling soap, and I think we are in for a tough spell. I have lived through one direct hit by a hurricane (Carol, 1954) and am not looking forward to going through another.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 07:27 pm:

John, keep your head down and chin up. Will send up prayers for all in path of storm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

Hal, I don't know exactly where in SE Georgia you are, but the long and short of it is, CURRENTLY, SE Georgia looks to get close to 100 MPH winds, IF it holds it's energy as it traverses up the east side of Florida above Orlando. Trouble is, it changes about every 4 hours. After 9/11, I've never let any of my fuel tanks get below 3/4ths., times like these just reinforce that rather anal concern of mine! Good luck to you, I think your area is in for a bumpy ride come Monday.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 09:49 pm:

So aside from last min take in of stuff and tying up a couple boats (don't want to block the canal until the last min) we are ready. As far as prep buys I topped off the car a few days ago ant that was it. I didn't even walk into a grocery store, didn't think about buying extra water or gas. This is what it means to live in a hurricane zone and be prepared.

The past 72 hours have mostly been spent helping many people much more well off than us (we are in a downstairs that may flood). We will be in our choice of 4 fortresses so there is no risk of loss of life. Staying put will mean we will be able to save possible items that otherwise would be lost. If we get a high storm surge on the high tides we have been having it is very simple we will lose most everything and there is nothing that will prevent this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 01:33 am:

Hunker down and be safe! We in the Earthquake and forest fire zones are with you in spirit.
One of the things that never ceases to amaze me, is people. You are facing storms the likes of which I have never seen, and I have seen a lot! Yet, this crazy town I live in shuts down for two inches of snow! I just don't get it.

It is amazing how a little planning can go a long way. I have a measly 1800 peak Watt generator (actually cannot run my 900 Watt microwave oven). We have lost power due to storms, Earthquakes, and incompetent governmental planning many times. Under about six hours? I don't do anything about it except to not open the fridge unnecessarily. Several outages have been longer, a few well into two days. Those, that little puny generator and a few extension cords sets up the house in a few minutes. That pathetic little generator that can't run the microwave, runs the refrigerator plus a couple lamps and the small TV just fine. At night? I switch a few things off, and put on the electric blanket. The propane barbecue provides all the cooking I need. What more should I want for a couple days?

Be safe my friends!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 04:00 am:

I'm letting a young coworker who lives near savannah come stay with us. His area is evacuating. It may get bad. I don't know. There were two maps on the same website yesterday (weather channel, I think). One showed wind speed in our area to be maybe 100 mph, but then the other map showed an array of colors depicting the chance for said high winds. We were in the 5% zone. So how do you tell? We'll ride it out, I suppose. I'm much more worried about the Floridians than I am myself. No doubt they are about to get hit hard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 07:40 am:

Chadwick...from your profile you're in Key Largo, elevation barely 7' above sea level. They're predicting a storm surge of 15'. How can you stay there and survive that, not to mention the 150 mph winds? No offense but I can't believe you're not leaving, er, rather haven't left yesterday! I will pray for you and yours. Might as well call the insurance company today while you have phone service, I can't believe there'll be any boats left down there after Irma is done. God Bless you and good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Stryker on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 08:22 am:

I have never left in a hurricane. We have a small generator for general household stuff that we run a few hours a day. We don't worry about bottled water - we have a couple bathtubs and plenty of pots. I also keep a spare 12v battery to run LED lights, radio, and at one time a small TV before those became obsolete. We are blessed to have a home built in 1960 that has a bomb shelter - 2' of poured concrete on each side and 3' on top. If the motorhome survives (good generator in it) we use it to sleep in so we can have AC and I can have my CPAP machine. That being said, if we have a medium cat 4 or a cat 5, we would likely leave. No death wish here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 08:26 am:

The biggest problem the guys from Georgia have in a hurricane is ducking the flying peaches!

Got to have a bit of levity here!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Stryker on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 08:36 am:

I thought the biggest worry were airborne grits, not flying peaches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 09:26 am:

Terry, you've been lucky plus having a rare bomb shelter sure didn't hurt, but most people don't have that luxury. This storm is now unprecedented. Making Andrew look like a small breeze. I'm sure by now Hal in GA is aware starting tomorrow they're under mandatory evacuation along the Georgia coast also, altho I'm not really sure if he's in the evac. zone or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 07:37 pm:

We're 100 miles inland. As of now, our county is supposedly in a state of emergency, but I don't believe we will see any evacuation notices. Next county West is not in state of emergency. We are expecting 45 to 75 mph winds and 8 to 12 inches of rain. Or at least that's what it was at one point. Course, that'll change several times before Sunday night.

Traffic on US 1, through town was crazy a few minutes ago. Funny no one seems to be heading West, only North. Most gas stations are out of gas, but a few have some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 08:41 pm:

Good luck to you Hal and all folks in the affected area. Will be thinking about you all and hope the storm is not as severe as some projections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 09:35 pm:

Thanks. I'm not too worried right now. I do feel for FL. They're gonna have a rough time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 08:18 am:

I have solid homes to stay in here. The surge will be gone quick here and then its picking up the pieces.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 11:13 am:

Good luck. When I lived in Mobile we had one of those. My neighbor thought it funny when I left with my family to avoid it. Only a little wind and rain he said. I replied that I hope all the trees and limbs were out of the way when I came back. He thought that was funny. Came home three days later dodging limbs to get to my house. My neighbor was out cutting limbs. Bill I said. I thought you were going to have this mess cleaned up. No smile. My neighbors had been through lots. Sorry that I had been a Smart A--. I wish all of you well whether you stay or go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 11:38 am:

To all the Nay Sayers, yeah, its all 'Fake News', right? We'll see. As far as I'm concerned, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound (or ton) of cure. The surge may not last long, but the wind and rain, depending on the storm track, will.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Horton, Utah on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 12:11 pm:

A couple of weeks ago or so, my wife and I were out at Hill AFB doing some grocery shopping at the commissary. I live in a society that firmly believes in food storage, which makes sense to me, so I had 3 or 4 bags of Starbucks coffee in the cart when we got ready to check out. Our cashier was a very nice lady, Linda, who is also a dyed in the wool greenie. She made a comment about the amount of coffee I was buying, so I told her, “Linda, I was out working in the yard two or three weeks ago and the sky started getting dark, even though it was in the middle of the day, I believe the end is near”. She looked at me like “you’re kidding, right?.

Anyway, with the western part of the country on fire, the east and south being thumped by hurricanes and now the news that there was a 141 cluster of small earthquakes just to the north of us at Soda Springs, Idaho, think I’ll go buy some more coffee, as well as an adequate amount of spirits to make it through to the end.

Cheers,

Ron


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 12:51 pm:

Winds are blowing water is over the dock. However, it is high tide on a full moon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 12:55 pm:

I was laughing at your post Ron not because I don't agree, I do! Portland was dusted all the way to Aloha ten miles west with ash. Seen the sun yesterday after noon at the coast for the first time in days All we need now is a tsunami to keep damage more equal with Texas and the east coast------enough writing have to get some spirits!
Stay safe folks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 02:13 pm:

Ron, if you buy Irish whisky along with the coffee, you can kill two birds with one stone, so to speak.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:15 pm:

The problem with that, Terry, is that if EVERYONE, evacuated just to be sure, because you can never be too safe, because an ounce of precaution is worth a pound of cure, et al, the roads are jammed to the pint the ones who really need to leave, can't. If everyone buys up all the gas, there's none left for those who need it. All things are relative I guess, but while some are leaving here because of the hurricane, others are COMING HERE, because of the hurricane. Funny how the media have whipped up some into such a frenzy that people are fleeing for their lives from what others have sought as their safe haven.

Naysayer? Maybe to some. I still believe I am going to be more affected by the shortages and traffic than I will by the storm. Hope I'm right. If not, I'll admit it to you guys.

To any of you Floridians that stayed, hunker down and be safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:31 pm:

I would leave there too,I am in north ga and they claim Tuesday we will have wind of 45-50 mph and huge amounts of rain. Staying in Florida is to much of a gamble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:38 pm:

Chadwick, you brave soul. Take some video of the onslaught if you are able and good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:41 pm:

Hal,
That line of cars waiting for gas was at a Costco gas station. In California, that's a normal day at Costco!
Hope everyone in Florida stays safe, whether you choose to stay or evacuate. Our best wishes go out to all of you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:41 pm:

Yours truly is in East Naples - which translates under the present forecast to ground zero. The T is in a block garage with hurricane-rated roof and door. I also put it up on car dollys to give an extra couple of inches in case of flood (which I don't expect). Get out? With two big dogs and no gas or water available around here to get stuck on I 75 at 8-15 mph and run out of gas? I think we are safer where we are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 04:54 pm:

Hal Davis, Excellent point! John C, To you also.

All perception is relative. The news stations should "report" and "inform" realistically, and allow intelligent people to make an informed decision. To "go" or "stay" is more a matter of an individual's knowledge and abilities to handle such situations than it is a matter of natural disasters. There of course is a point where things go beyond anyone's ability to "deal".
The news stations today mostly subscribe to the modern paradigm of dependency of the masses. So that is how they play such events.

I don't know Chadwick A very well, though we have met. However, I have known his family for a very long time. Having known his grandparents, and a couple of his uncles, I have little doubt that he can handle his current situation as well as most anybody, especially for one so young. Most of his family are very good, highly intelligent, and self reliant, people.
Good luck! To Chad and all our friends in the path of this (regardless of its political realities).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 05:19 pm:

Is there more of the sermon on the mound??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 06:18 pm:

I live in Wisconsin. Beautiful day. 70 and sunny. Badgers won. My Model T was a feature before the game in Madison, many thanks to the University for that.

I'm glad I live here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 06:37 pm:

I love watching the "Crestfallen" look on the weather people every time they have to move the track further west!:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 09:02 pm:

Hal, I know that evacuations can produce traffic problems. We Houstonians saw that with Hurricane Ike. Too many people tried to leave Houston on I 10 W and the freeway couldn't handle the traffic, even after the DOT removed some traffic barriers, creating contraflow lanes. I 10 W became a parking lot; people ran out of gas; the outside temperature and humidity were stifling, and there were deaths. If people didn't die from stress or medical reasons, they died from the heat and humidity. This time the new Houston mayor and Harris County Judge told everyone to stay put and not evacuate and Houston had its worse flood in over 75 years, killing people by drowning. I wasn't affected except for my vehicle and parts storage, but I'm not ready to by drowning or stuck in traffic on a Interstate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 10:15 pm:

The folks in the Sun Coast sort of got screwed. Up until y'day the message was " you'll be on the backside of the hurricane, winds of 72-80 mph". Ok, its September and on the Sun Coast due west of Tampa, you get one or two blows during the month anyway. Was ok for me, wife and I came back up north 2 weeks ago and had the local handyman go over and put up the storm shutters once we got word the path shifted west. While the house is only 3/4 mile inland, it sits on an old Indian camp site at 38 feet elevation.

Why go through that? Son lives over by Tampa airport, his area went to forced evac only last night with the latest shift west. Where to go? Word was already out that all the east coasters had taken all of the gas along 75 north of the area on their way towards Atlanta and the road was still near parking lot status. So he and a whole bunch all the way yup to near Crystal River have no options but to hunker down as it was "relatively safe" until last night. I hear some may head to Miami up to the Space Coast as there will be lots of space there.

My son decided to put his 1945 MB Jeep on cribbing as high as he could in his garage, leaving the bottom of the Jeep at 13 ft above sea level and heading TO the Gulf and taking up residence at n my house! As he says....you gotta do what you gotta do when life leaves you lemons and no options even for lemonade

He took this shot of my house buttoned up tight this evening...how peaceful...for now

Prayers out for fellow Sun Coast members. They too all got stuck the same way for the most part!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 10:18 pm:

Pete, you've got it absolutely right. People are too dense to prep for anything the way you did and probably still do. I've read this post through and I'm not buying the c**p about "scareing" anybody. You didn't get off your fat keester when you needed gas or propane or plywood or whatever until it was too late to do any thing about it and now it's evertone elses fault. Sorry folks but they've been warning yall for a week now at least. Man up. It's your fault. Still, I wish you the best of luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 05:22 am:

5AM here in Key Largo, the wind is howling pretty good. We have had a water rise but unlike the rest being on an island it is going down with the tide. The next high tide at 1PM could be a big problem. Our gas was taken on labor day as the tourists got scared and filled up on their way home. Then again a couple days later as the weekenders came down to check their homes and boats and filled up with gas (cars, trucks, boats, and every fuel tank they could) leaving us with nothing. If you think cars can take fuel try filling up boats.

As far as evacuating its all about knowns and unknowns.

I know I have a solid home to stay in well above the maximum surge.
I know I have generators and tools here for after the storm.
I know our town for the most part was built and has been rebuilt to take a direct hit
I know I can get fuel out of any number of boats should I need to.
I know I have a bed to sleep in.
I know I want to be here after the storm asap

If I were to leave
I don't know where the storm is going
I don't know where I should go
I don't know what I will find there
I don't know if I can get somewhere


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 07:07 am:

My brother lives in Ft Myers. He says he cannot evacuate because of his business and equipment. The last time he evacuated the looters came in after he had been gone 30 minutes (Captured by surveillance cameras) and he lost $350,000. When Charlie came through because of his boats he had fuel If someone came up and needed some gas for a generator he would give them 5 or 10 gallons and had a pickle jar by the boat with instructions put in what you can or think it is worth, they tried to get him for price gouging but couldn't find any witnesses. I hope and pray he fares as well this time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 11:13 am:

I am so very grateful that my friends Robert in Miami and Will in West Melbourne are OK for now.


FreighTer Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 11:39 am:

GR.
So your brother asked people to compensate him for gas he owned at a price they thought was fair and didn't just give it to them?

Isn't he obligated to share everything he has worked for and not make them feel bad?


I am praying for his safety and many others in Florida.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 11:42 am:

Thank you Fred!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 01:39 pm:

Some of the newest video from key west, it's nuts
https://www.pscp.tv/alibaba468/1mrGmmYrOXwGy?t=3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 10:12 pm:

Bump


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 07:58 am:

Good news. Help is on the way. Our plant has been closed until today, but on my way in this morning, I passed a convoy of power company bucket trucks from Illinois on I-16 headed toward Savannah. I don't know where they are headed. Savannah certainly still has people without power, but I-16 intersects I-95 in Savannah and the FL-GA line is only 100 miles, so they may well be headed down there. Wherever they are headed, I'm sure they will be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 08:20 am:

A caravan of San Antonio power company trucks left last night for Florida. They had already sent trucks to the Harvey hit area a couple of weeks ago. These are the "linesman" crews with pole trucks, transformers and the climbers. They said they expect to be Florida for at least three weeks. I suspect these are all volunteers coordinated by the Florida power companies. They must be coming from all over the US. It's no short trip to Florida from San Antonio. It's five hours by car (70mph) to just get to Louisiana.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 03:17 pm:

Any word from Chadwick since Sunday? Hope all is well. I know he has been through it. Please let us know when you can, we are a group of caring friends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 04:38 pm:

Hal D and Stephen, Yeah, have you ever ridden in one of those trucks? I have. Bad enough for a few miles, they rattle and bounce horribly (makes a model T feel like a Rolls Royce). I have driven or ridden in those kind of trucks for over 200 miles quite a few times. It is probably one (of many) reasons why my tinnitus is so bad these days.

Hats off to the many service crews responding to these disasters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Macky Mongold on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 05:10 pm:

Has anyone heard from Chadwick Azevedo since the hurricane went through?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 05:47 pm:

I bumped his thread just now. His last post was Monday morning early.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

I'm alive and have been comfortable the entire time, only just now got wifi and tv back on. Some have responded with disgust that I have been too comfortable and eating too well while everyone is suffering. Something to remember in survival mode is you ARE going to lose your power and all frozen food, what would you be eating? Most of the island here is on cleanup duty. I have a pile I have made by myself that is bigger than my car while somehow managing to help a dozen other people that did not stay and needed damage reports etc. I've burned thru a half tank of gas just checking on others houses when I could have been trying to save my own stuff.


By the way has anybody else noticed this hit us on 9/11?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 10:33 pm:

Right now the news is reporting RIGHT NOW about Key Largo "Hurricane victims are struggling for supplies"

Resturants open include Tower of Pizza (since yesterday noon), the moose (yesterday morning), Sushi Nami, and a few other. As far as basic food Winn Dixie AND Publix are both open. To my knowledge when all your grocery stores have opened and various resturants are open as well there is no reson to struggle for supplies. But then thats just mean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 10:47 pm:

For anyone looking to see the actual damage . . .

https://storms.ngs.noaa.gov/storms/Irma/index.html

The devestation the news shows are the various trailer parks, look closely. In nearly every shot you will see a wood prefab home on stilts that survived. Everyone I know who lives in a trailer knows it all goes away in a storm and they just take the most important stuff when they run.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:43 am:

Great comments Chadwick A! Thank you.


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