Tire Questions for 1915 Model T Touring

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Tire Questions for 1915 Model T Touring
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Jones on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 02:38 pm:

1. What size tires do I need. The vehicle currently has Wards 30x3.5 all around, but I have been advised that its more typical to have 30x3.5 on the rear and 30x3 in the front.
2. I plan to get a full set with tubes. Should I also plan on getting a set of liners. I've had the car for 10 years but never had the tires off so I don't know the condition of the liners. Any speculation on whether the liners will need to be replaced.
3. Is it recommended to the the car on jack stands during the winter. I left the car sitting on flats for awhile and that's why I need new tires.

Thanks for you help, Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 03:21 pm:

Well, if your car is currently shod with 30x3.5 tires up front, then that's the size of your rims and they won't take a 30x3-size tire. -What you have is not unprecedented as Canadian cars did have that setup. -If your car has a driver-side door up front, it's Canadian and that explains your tire configuration. -The advantage is that, if you ever need to change a tire on the road, you only need to carry one spare.

If by liners you mean flaps, I suppose there's not a thing wrong with brand new flaps, but it's hard for me to imagine a set of flaps actually wearing out. -I doubt you'll need to replace existing flaps. -When mounting tires, I make sure the rim is smooth anywhere it's going to touch rubber, and I cover the inside of the rim with a double layer of duct tape. -Some guys frown on duct tape :-( , but it has worked out just fine for me. -As your car is a '15, it's probably black with black rims, so after you mount up the tires you can touch up any scratched paint with a little brush and a few dabs of black Rustoleum.

Jack stands couldn't hurt, but I don't happen to use them for winter storage. -Just roll the car backward or forward a couple of feet every few weeks and you'll avoid flat spots. -On the other hand, if you're going to be changing tires anyway, you might as well invest in a set of jack stands (I don't trust jacks). -And if you have 'em, you might as well use 'em. -It doesn't take more than ten minutes to get the car up on four stands, so it's not really an issue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harris, Huntington Beach California on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 03:30 pm:

The modern tubes are prone to leak. If your old ones have been holding air & are not full of patches or cracks, I would re-use them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 05:29 pm:

I just changed my first model T tire. A 3.00 for the front of the T. Smooth tire was on the fronts, so I went with the Firestone repo smooth tire for $180. After reading all the threads and using my long tire spoons, I shreadded the tube and it was $25 down the drain. I got another tube and spent the same amount for a flap and the tire went on like easy peasy and no leaks.

On my WWII jeep, if the cost of the flap becomes an issue, others have taken the old tube, cut it around the perimeter in such a way that it mimics a flap shape, cut a hole for the valve stem and use the old tube strip as a cheap liner. It will keep the tire spoons from snagging on the new tube.

Another "trick" that I had not seen mentioned, was we took a metal valve stem extension and threaded it on the new tube valve stem and it made it easer to pull the new tube stem through the hole in the rim. After mounting, remove the extension and put on the cap.

So, bottom line, if this is your first personal tire change, I'd suggest to go with the flaps or a substitute for them.

If you don't have a spare tire now, keep one or two of yur best old tires and use them as spares. Even for looks. Some cannot justify the expense for a new tire and flap just for a spare unless they are adding them into the rotation equation. But all 4 tires have to be the same size to do that.

Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 05:39 pm:

I just re-tired my '19 Centerdoor, removing some 30 year old New Zealand Firestones - there were flaps installed by the previous owner and they were harder than hell & were replaced with new, live rubber ones !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 05:45 pm:

Clincher tires from Ford production never had flaps/liners. With good clean rims, I don't use them and never have had a flat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Friday, September 08, 2017 - 10:20 am:

Michael, The Canadian cars came with 30x3.5 on all four tires. Demountables do the same. Why carry two spares when one will do? US Model Ts did have the 30x3s in front.


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