No power

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: No power
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

Just starting to get my 24 touring road worthy
It cranks and runs fine but on the road it will not climb a small hill there is no power.I put an Anderson timer on it and I set the spark lever
Correctly I think what am I missing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:05 pm:

Was the engine recently rebuilt?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:12 pm:

I am not sure the guy I got it from has many t-shirt
He bought it At an estate sale. It seems to run quiet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:14 pm:

I am not sure the guy I got it from has many t's
He bought it At an estate sale. It seems to run quiet. He thought it had been


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

Try checking and resetting the timing per this procedure:

http://www.dauntlessgeezer.com/DG97.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:23 pm:

Try adjusting the carburetor mixture control. It's the wire sticking up through the firewall, behind the dashboard. Adjust it while trying to climb a hill and see if it makes a difference.

It could be you have a rich enough mixture to run OK on the flat, but not on a hill.

If that doesn't solve it, there's a possibility of a vacuum leak where the intake manifold meets the block. You can spray some starter fluid around those junctions with the engine running, and if there is a noticeable increase in the speed of the engine, it's sucking the ether into the combustion chambers through the leak(s).

Of course, there's an old saying in the Model T world: "90% of carburetor problems are electrical." So these cheap and easy tests may tell you nothing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:30 pm:

Thanks guys I used that timing procedure and I think that is good.I have not checked for vac leak but I will.I am new to ts but have a good knowledge of engines I know they are not dragster
But my weedeater has more power


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 08:55 am:

i think i need to check my rear end ratio. the car seems faster than i think it should be on flat ground. philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danny_s on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 02:39 pm:

what about compression?
valves sealing ok?
rings in good shape?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 03:41 pm:

Mine had this issue... could barely roll itself into the storage barn.. pretty glare with a tiny bump to the concrete. In the spring, I removed tje sediment bulb screen and cleaned out (althou, it looked very clean ti me), then took the the carb off, then then the bowl and cleaned it out... then took the main needle valve and needle and seat out, and blew them all out , just by blowing through them. Re-assembled, and everything ran grate.

Likely some bit of dirt that was lodged in the main needle or needle and seat area.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 03:45 pm:

have not done a compression test feels fine on the hand crank. i need to make an adapter for my tester.
i am going through the fuel system tomorrow. philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 04:28 pm:

Several questions:
Has it always run this way, or did it just begin running like this? If it just started to lose power, did you make any adjustments or replacements of parts just before it lost power?

Have you driven other Model T's? How does it compare with the others? All stock T's are slow on hills but will pull most hills in low gear if the gas tank is full. They will also pull a 6% grade in high if it is approached at speed, but will have a hard time getting into high if you start out on a hill.

What gear ratio is in your rear axle? Sometimes a higher gear ratio is installed to gain more top speed on level or downhill but it will also sacrifice power going uphill. You can find the gear ratio by pushing the car in high gear with someone turning the hand crank. You count how many turns the engine turns for one turn of the rear wheel. The stock ratio is 3.6 turns of the engine to one turn of the axle. If it is 3.0 to one, you have a higher than stock ratio and it will make the car lose power on hills.

Have you checked the compression of the engine? It should be close to 50 psi per cylinder. They should all be the same pressure. The psi will be lower at higher altitudes.

Are all spark plugs firing?

Have you tried different positions of the spark lever?

Are you running on magneto or battery, or distributor or other ignition source?

Are your brakes dragging?

How is your fuel adjustment? It should be turned clockwise until the engine starts to slow down and then counter clockwise until the engine begins to lope. Find the sweet spot somewhere between those two positions.

Even the weight on the car makes a difference. I can tell the difference when driving alone or with one passenger. It slows down with each passenger. This would also be true if carrying cargo.

All these things will affect your performance, especially on hills.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

So little information... I agree with most of Norm's suggestions above but I'd keep it really simple for now. 1: Compression test (nothing better for finding out the eng. condition) 2: Plug gap/condition. 3: Timer condition 4: Coils (new caps, HCCT'd?)5:Fuel system 6: Carb condition & settings. 7: Your knowledge/driving abilities concerning the T. Wouldn't worry about the rear end gearing just yet. You probably need some engine TLC + some miles under your belt first. Keep asking questions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 09:17 pm:

I bought the car a year ago it ran and drove. I have since restored the paint body seats and top.
Car cranks and runs good I just replaced a roller timer with a Anderson I have the spark right.I am new to all of this so I don't know what it should drive like but the small hills kill it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Friday, September 15, 2017 - 09:25 pm:

The rear end is normal I checked that.tomorrow I will inspect the fuel system and road test her again


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