Setting up a new mag

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Setting up a new mag
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 06:35 pm:

I am pulling my engine tomorrow morning to install a new mag. I do not have any of the Ford tools for setting the clearances. Is there another way to do this so the end product will be correct? I have never done this before even with the proper tools so any other advice you can share would be appreciated. I want this absolutely right when I am done. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 07:03 pm:

This may not be technically correct but it is a Model T. The main bearings maintain the end play of the crankshaft, if the end play is reasonable the coils can be shimed to the correct distance, I believe the max is about .030 - .032. An additional quick fix for excessive end play is to shim (spacer washer) between the front pulley and the block. Large bronze washers are available for different applications. Find the right thickness and place it between the pulley and the block until the end play is minimal then adjust the coil assembly with the shims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 07:55 pm:

I think Steve is talking about the height of the magnets on the ring. You want them reasonably uniform to keep the clearance within specs. It can be done without the tool that was made for that purpose but it is a lot more time consuming. Years ago I did one by taking a rebuilt mag ring that was not warped and laid it over the flywheel with the recharged magnet installed. I measured the gap where the magnets did not sit flush with the spool and marked them. I rotated the ring several times to confirm the measurements. In my case there were only a few higher magnets so lowering them, redoing the measurements and lowering the next group of magnets brought all of the magnets into contact. With that done the next step was to shim for end gap clearance and that was just a process of adding and removing shim to get the required clearance. May not be the way the to do it for maximum results but the car still starts on mag when hot after more than 15 years. I should add that I eventually bought the gap gauge and that makes it a lot easier. I would try to borrow one if you can. I would lend you mine but it is in Florida and I am in NY right now. Steve, if you can wait I will be back in Florida by 11/1 and can send it to you then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 08:59 pm:

Val, I really appreciate the offer. If I have trouble or don't have it set up by then I will definitely contact you. Thank you again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 10:29 pm:

Knowledge is power. Between the MTFCA books and Mike Bender's online videos, you should be powerful enough to get good results.

My method for getting all the magnets on the flywheel about the same height is to put shims under the spools where they're low. I hate the idea of whacking the high magnets with a hammer to get them lower. I'd rather raise the low ones.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Monday, September 18, 2017 - 11:33 pm:

Steve, along with all the great advice above, i would also advise to have extreme patience as this task can be quite tedious to get the gap correct. I had my ring and flywheel off a half dozen times before i was satisfied with the results. I had my magnet plates ground flat when i had it balanced (thanks J&M) so all i needed to do was to shim the coil ring. Get yourself a bunch of shim's that I'll put a link to, and maybe a set of Brass feeler gauges, and take your time and have fun working on your T. :-)

https://www.modeltford.com/item/3272BR.aspx





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 12:12 am:

If you don't have them I suggest as Steve did, get the Transmission or Motor rebuild books from any of the dealers. Setting the gap is best done with the engine vertical on the engine stand and don't try setting with the transmission still in place. You will need to install and remove the flywheel many time to get the job done. You don't what to be lifting all that extra weight over and over off the end of the engine. You will need to keep the transmission main shaft in place as it acts as a spacer between the crankshaft flange and the flywheel.
You can also can google "MTFCA; magneto setup"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 12:20 am:

good advice given, I did mine with good results - but for me - I found it to be quite the challenge ! take your time and don't get flusterd, good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 12:30 am:

Mark, my final pic wasn't intended as a "How to properly adjust", but as a completed unit. But thanks for the jab.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 12:50 am:

I would add that you need to mark the flywheel and crankshaft flange so you will know where they joined prior to your removal trust me it will help. I agree 100% on the brass feeler gauge & doing this in the vertical position. Unless you have a hoist you'll need a friend to help, about the third time you remove the transmission you'll understand. Gap between the magnet face plate and the field coil should be between .025 and .040. if you do this in the horizontal (it's a nightmare) then you'll have to compensate for the weight generally between.06 & .010 on the bottom side closer and the reciprocal on the top but really don't do it that way. The closer the gap standard the better especially if you have play in the crank. What I will say here and there may be disagreement on this, if you're going to this much trouble you might as well replace the brass screws that hold the face plates on. After 100 years the brass in the original screws may be crystallized and brittle. What could happen is that if you don't replace them the face plate could come off and destroy your field coil and more. Attached is a picture from Lang's of the crankshaft spacer that someone was talking about to decrease endplay. It is a stop gap measure at best if you are not rebuilding the engine because of cost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 09:46 am:

Thanks fellas, I really appreciate the info. and advice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 10:10 am:

When you buy the new brass magnet screws, be aware that they come in two different versions. An original Ford ring gear takes screws with a 14-24 thread. The new ones inexplicably take a -20 thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 11:15 am:

Steve, it's 1/4-24, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

This subject has come up many times, what years had ring gears with #14 screws? I have an original 26-27 ring gear with 1/4 24 screws. I also have an original 1915 (no ring gear) with 1/4 24 screws.
What models had #14 screws? A 1/4 24 screw will not go in to a #14 24 thread. There was a transitional time where as the threads were rolled versus cut and the diameters may have varied, it is therefore possible that these varied 1/4 24 screw threads may fit into a #14 thread. Some screws have a very narrow shank from the top of the thread to the head of the screw and some are very thick. Ford did have a spec for these screws however the threads still do vary.


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