OT - Steam Tractor Hill Climb

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - Steam Tractor Hill Climb
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 02:31 am:

-Maybe for others to also enjoy-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFVT_CtL62M&feature=youtu.be

Some of the article's commentary cause a pause....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:07 pm:

Been there, done that. It appears that the camera was tilted a bit, looking at the trees in the background. Whatever, that old boy is taking his life in his hands, that rig is right at the tipping point, the long wheelbase is about all that is saving him. In my rice farming days, we used John Deere D's and Case Model L's, when plowing, the left front wheels were almost always off the ground, and sometimes they would flip over backwards, the D's especially, so short. Those steam tractors were just about all gone in my day, used mostly as a stationary power unit for a rice separator. They were seldom moved, but always drew a crowd when they were.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:18 pm:

Grady,I think that is the first propane D i ever saw!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:18 pm:

Yep, camera definitely tilted. Also, I was always taught it's a poor engineer that allows his pop-off valve to pop off, other than for the occasional test. I've only popped one off unintentionally once. And that was due to a misunderstanding of operating pressure. I asked operating pressure and was told the pop-off pressure instead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:23 pm:

I was under the impression that it was dangerous to run a steam engine on an incline, due to the water level in the boiler? Bud, there was a big steamer on Lawndale road?? in Saginaw township, just south of MCarty. It was gone by the mid-1980's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:28 pm:

Mr. DeLong, there is a story behind that Propane (Butane). There was a small gas plant in the area. At the time, they vented Butane (Propane) to atmosphere, they were interested only in the oil in the pipeline. They told us they would give us the Butane if we wanted it. We all made our own conversions, as such, it consisted mostly just a small "expander" to convert the liquid to a gas. It all worked wonderfully well, and we converted everything. I ran my pickup on Butane-Propane until just a few years ago, it is good stuff, oil stays clean, plugs last forever, etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

I think the danger of running a steamer that far off level is the crown sheet might be exposed with no water to cool it?? Ed,I don't remember that steamer but about 59 or 60 i helped friends thrash with steam at M-46 and Old 27.I just saw the same friend at Blanchard this summer still running steam!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

Ed,

Going uphill is not too much of a problem. It is the crown sheet above the firebox that MUST stay below the water level. Going up hill, the crown sheet is on the downhill end of the boiler and is well under water. Going back down is where it can get dangerous. All the water moves forward and could uncover the crown sheet. Water level in the boiler should be increased before going down hill. The sight glass (and try cocks) are back at the firebox end and the engineer should watch it carefully and keep the water level high enough to keep the crown sheet covered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:39 pm:

Oops, Bud beat me to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:41 pm:

Reminds me of 'the days on the farm'... (I observed a similar 'battle'.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLQhvruimfs&feature=youtu.be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 12:53 pm:

Hal,You did a better job of explaining it!! Years ago people were killed by low water in Ohio.Ed,Frank DeLong had a threashing machine and the boy's for a crew.They went farm to farm with a 15-30,a 8 hp gas engine and teams.When the bridge was rated too low for weight of a steamer they were also using they got a full head of steam and drove the engine through the Pine River!! The water was high and the fire was drowned out but they still had steam and made it!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 01:21 pm:

Look at this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVxByLO_6cA

Throwing out some real ashes. Cool!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 01:52 pm:

Thanks Marv. I have been missing out on my steam fix lately.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 04:10 pm:

Not ashes, cinders... oh well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 04:45 pm:

There is nothing like the sound of a steam engine. Someday when I get rich I will have a steam car and a traction engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 04:55 pm:

Buckly,Mi has a spark show every night at their show.The engine is belted to a dino/or brake so they can make it work and then they put straw in the fire box.That is the reason there were no sparks at the start of the pull,the engine was not working hard enough at the start of the pull.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 04:55 pm:

Jerry V. I think he was pulling that sled home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Friday, September 22, 2017 - 07:31 pm:

Grady, Bud beat me to it and how did I miss this thread! Marv, thank you for starting this!
Grady, that's way too cool. A D using butane/propane. Thank you for the pics and explanation.
Full pull with a kettle. Umm portable bar-B-Q grill. Err steam engine. ;-) Nice 110.
Wanna see what a (perhaps) snug drive gear that (perhaps) wasn't oiled well enough on the crankshaft will do for a 110 Case when doing belt tests?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TT13273G8ag
Remember Big Mac McMillan's Elgin watch Case engine? A real hill climber.
It's said and softly warned that "popping off" a boiler changes the size of the barrel (the boiler) a trifle so it should be avoided if possible.
Loved that English engine just walking away with the JD puller tractor.
Remember when tractors were raced instead of pulled?
Cedar sawdust makes a great spark show additive to the firebox. :-)
I don't want to think about that Case in Ohio that was run low water on the crown-sheet.
Is it 1700 or 17000 expanse rate when steam meets the outside air? I forget.
It'll upset (tip it over) a 25000 pound engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Friday, September 22, 2017 - 11:15 pm:

One pound of water will expand to 26.8 cubic feet of steam at atmospheric pressure. That's a volumetric ratio of 1:1673. This happens quickly/explosively in a crown sheet failure in a pressurized boiler. As an example, an operating boiler containing 500 gallons of water at 150 psi will 'boil' at 366 deg F. When that boiler bursts the 'heat' in the water is sufficient to convert 28% of the 500 gallons to steam instantly. That's 32,400 cubic feet of steam produced virtually instantaneously, explosively. Crown sheet failures often lifted the rear end of the boiler upward as the steam 'exploded' downward into the firebox. The engineer and fireman were often the first casualties.
Sorry to hijack the thread, the video was spectacular and the commentary very informative. best, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, September 23, 2017 - 02:30 am:

Yes camera was tilted a bunch. This is about right based on the guys standing on the tractor.


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