Largest collection of T's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Largest collection of T's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Lindberg on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 01:01 pm:

Seeing the Pics from the museum in Russia got me thinking. What is the largest T collection on the world? Also what would be considered a complete collection of model T's? If we just say Ford made 7 body styles (Roadster, touring, coupe, 2 door sedan, 4 door sedan, chassis, and ton truck)for the 18 years of production that would be 126 different cars. I know there are other body styles out there as well and not sure if they made all of those body styles in the early years. I am young so maybe that is something to start working on, Ha Ha.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 01:24 pm:

The really great Ford Museum in the Netherlands which I was lucky enough to visit just before they closed earlier this year had many Ts but not more than the military museum near Moscow.

The Henry Ford museum my guess could have more Ts than the one in Russia but quality of cars matters too, it's not only about numbers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 01:44 pm:

There have been several very large early Ford collections, like the Towe museum in California and Den Hertoog's museum in the Netherlands, but they have been sold off due to taxes and the owner's passing, but I guess other large collections exists now that isn't open to the public..

It's probably impossible for everyone to agree how many cars a complete T collection should have, but all body types for every year would be a bit excessive in my humble opinion - even if there are subtle differences between a '19 and a '23 coupe, one suicide door coupe would cover the style fairly well.

The MTFCA club museum in Richmond, In is getting more and more interesting as donations are gathered there :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 02:53 pm:

Roger,

I was lucky enough to visit Bill Harrah's collection in Reno before his death and I believe he had just that, one of each body style offer for that year for every year of production. Model T's and Model A's....

I was 14 at the time 1976 and it made an indelible impression on me. The whole thing was unbelievable.

If there is someone out there that knows better or more accurately I'll bow to their superior knowledge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Lindberg on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 05:28 pm:

My Grandpa Talks about how the Harrah collection once was but I was born to late to see the glory days. Anyone have pictures of all the Fords there in there in the 70's?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 10:49 pm:

Of all the cars that were in his collection there is only one that to this day stands out that and I remember, that was the Phantom Corsair. I have a Hot Wheels model of it in the the wrapper that I got some years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dodd on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 11:25 pm:

I, like Mark, also remember the Phantom Corsair. The driver did not sit clear to the left on that car. There was enough room for one passenger to the left. I was at the Harrah collection a couple of times when I went up to the Harrah Swap Meet. Truly a fun time in spite of the paint burning heat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 11:59 pm:

I saw Bill Harrahs collection many years ago. I think there were around 1400 cars at that time. I don't know how many T's he had, I was there to look at the 1909 cars, I think there were 6.
Largest collection now may be the late Don Meadows collection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 05:43 am:

I vote Don Meadows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Macleod on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 06:30 am:

I would be interested in hearing more about the Meadows collection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Lindberg on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 09:05 am:

I have never heard of the Medows collection either but here is an old thread I found and it sure looks impressive.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/320914.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 09:57 pm:

Back in 1968, I spent a day viewing the Harrah collection before being shipped out to Viet Nam. There were over a thousand cars to look at. A very large group of early T's to enjoy besides the Thomas Flyer, and Kennedy Presidential Lincoln. Harrah loved Packards and had an entire huge building full of them. He also had an extensive set of restoration shops there-like wood, metal, paint, upholstery and mechanical. A large library for research was also there. A little star was put on the windshield of perfect cars. Harrah also had a WW 2 warbird collection that was really neat also. Don Meadows collected early Model T's, a large number of which were AACA Senior cars the best of the best. Don was a self made man who was quite frugal in how he lived. On my last visit, he was going blind and could not enjoy looking at his collection, a sad ending for great car collector. I am very fortunate to have seen both collections and to have known Don Meadows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kurt Baltrusch on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 10:24 am:

The Towe Museum was in Montana and at one time contained just about every Ford from 1903 on. Ed Towe was an eastern Montana Banker and was one of the organizers of the original Montana 500 Model T race (1961?). He also travelled to South America and drove back several cars (30's phaetons?).
Montana could not support the museum and it moved to Sacramento, although there is still a good museum in Deer Lodge, MT. Ed's daughter Karen and husband Wes own several Model Ts and tour with the Rocky Mountain Model T group. There are others who know much more about this history.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 03:08 pm:

Kurt - Stan Howe in Helena, Mt. is one of the "others" you mentioned. "Unca' Stan and Louis Rector, Edward Towe's long-time friend and "mechanic" for the collection were close friends. To be a bit more specific, it wasn't that Montana couldn't support the Towe Collection in Deer Lodge; it was more that Ed Towe had some serious problems with the IRS that he was only able to solve by splitting up and selling part of the collection. It's a complicated story, but suffice to say, Edward Towe was an honest man and got into trouble with the IRS innocently enough. His daughter and son-in-law preserved as much of the collection as possible which (as far as I know) still exists in Sacramento, CA. As an "aside", my eldest son's very first "real job" as a teen-ager when we lived in Deer Lodge, Mt. was basically polishing the brass on the "brass era" Model T's in the collection. FWIW,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 03:15 pm:

Kurt - Stan Howe in Helena, Mt. is one of the "others" you mentioned. "Unca' Stan and Louis Rector, Edward Towe's long-time friend and "mechanic" for the collection were close friends. To be a bit more specific, it wasn't that Montana couldn't support the Towe Collection in Deer Lodge; it was more that Ed Towe had some serious problems with the IRS that he was only able to solve by splitting up and selling part of the collection. It's a complicated story, but suffice to say, Edward Towe was an honest man and got into trouble with the IRS innocently enough. His daughter and son-in-law preserved as much of the collection as possible which (as far as I know) still exists in Sacramento, CA. As an "aside", my eldest son's very first "real job" as a teen-ager when we lived in Deer Lodge, Mt. was basically polishing the brass on the "brass era" Model T's in the collection. FWIW,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 03:16 pm:

Oops! Not sure how that happened!


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