Wood strengthing epoxy'

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Wood strengthing epoxy'
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 03:33 pm:

What is used for soft wood repair and does it change the color of wood? My grandson makes wood rings and would like to make them stronger without color change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 04:43 pm:

I used a product called "Kwik-Poly" years ago on my '15 roadster on the door frames, tack strips etc. and it is truly amazing. It's not cheap and is available from Langs. I really don't know about changing the color, but I'm sure that someone on here will. Cheers : Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 05:18 pm:

Depending on the wood he's using, I'm not sure it will do what you want...this is a very thin material made to be wicked into punky/porous material. I would think that your grandson is using good solid material in his projects and this would not likely absorb to any real degree...but you can sure try and experiment!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 11:01 pm:

As an alternative to Kwik Poly, check these guys out- its good stuff.

http://smithandcompany.org/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 11:10 pm:

Kwik poly has a yellowis cream color
If you paint it on it will look wet like anyother product
But i used it on wood steering wheels and sanded them smooth and varnish but the seems had a yellowish color


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 12:06 am:

-Jim-
Don Booth in Bay City has used a marine epoxy with excellent results. Try making contact. He's been very helpful to me.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 12:16 am:

-Jim-
A little further explanation....
The process Don has used includes drilling zig-zag holes into the wood, wettened, blow dry and then fill in the holes with the epoxy. Some questionable wood has been salvaged and restored to decent metal strength. If you've ever used 'Gorilla Glue', and know how it forms 'tentacles' as it seeks moisture, you can envision how it works. Good luck.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Grabowski on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 12:17 am:

West systems is the marine epoxy. Great stuff for sealing up wood. Heated wood will absorb the product enter. Use the slow hardner for best results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 07:50 am:

Thank's I will pass this info to him, but sounds like most things are for bad wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 10:27 am:

This was the first thing to come to mind though the write up suggests that it won't penetrate very far into good wood. Anyone with a badly dry rotted cab or box who wants to keep and use it could probably benefit from this stuff though.
http://www.rotdoctor.com/products/cpes.html

I used to fly an airplane with a high tech wooden prop (it was an MT prop on a Zlin if you're a nerd like me) and I remember that down near the hub they had treated the wood with something that was said to plasticize it. We had a cutaway prop from the manufacturer and sure enough, it felt like a block of epoxy but looked like wood. I have no idea how they did that though I suspect it was a complex industrial procedure. I only bring this up to say that somehow or another it is possible to strengthen wood all the way through.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Harms - Sacramento County, CA on Sunday, October 01, 2017 - 09:50 pm:

Not sure if this would work but I use it all the time for dryrot repair.
It's easily available at large box stores.
It makes rotten wood rock solid. Not sure what it would do for fresh soft wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Monday, October 02, 2017 - 01:32 am:

www.abatron.com. I've been using this for 35 years on dryrotted exterior portions (such as window sills and siding) of my Victorian house and the repairs have never failed even after decades outside. I have found nothing better.

The Liquidwood is a 2 part epoxy that, when mixed is as thin as water so it will sink deep into the wood. when it cures, it is becomes a very hard plastic that retains the shape of the piece that is being repaired. It also has a decent working time, so that you can get as much to absorb deep into the wood as possible, which is essential. Other products have a very short working time so that the epoxy starts to set up before it has had a chance for the wood to absorb all it will hold. If the part is small enough you can soak it so that the wood will absorb as much as possible, otherwise, keep painting it on until it will absorb no more, because, once it starts to harden, the wood will absorb no more, so you only have one time to get it right. The more that is absorbed, the deeper it goes and the stronger the wood. If the surface of the wooed you are repairing is rough, Abatron also has a superb wood repair epoxy which is also the easiest to mix and the easiest to use. Jim Patrick


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