OT- Garage floor coatings

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT- Garage floor coatings
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 04:49 pm:

My new garage is almost finished, before I move anything into it I want to paint or somehow seal the floor from gas or oil leaks and spills. What would the best product to use? And why do you think so?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 05:05 pm:

Lowe's and Home Depot (and others I assume) sell paints made specifically for the purpose. If my memory serves, they are by Rustoleum, and I believe it's called Garage Floor Paint.

They are 2-part epoxy paints. This would likely be the most gas- and oil- resistant coating type.

I believe they sell things to mix in to make them less slippery, but there's always sand or ground walnut shells.

They also have flakes of colors to mix in, to make the finish look mottled.

As a former Contractor, let me warn you that whatever you use, be sure to read and follow all the instructions about letting the concrete cure, and treating it to remove or neutralize the remaining chemicals. Those chemicals are stronger than any paint, and can quickly ruin your finish. And if they recommend some kind of priming, do as they say.

Also, be sure to have proper ventilation, preferably via a big fan. The vapors from curing epoxy are noxious!!

Once you pass the warnings, that will give you a beautiful, long-lasting finish that you can be proud of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 05:14 pm:

Did you lay down a vapor barrier before pouring the slab. If not you may have adherence problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 05:41 pm:

Thanks for the feedback. Peter, I have been told that the Rustoleum product is a good one. I have also heard of a clear sealer that can be applied but I know nothing more about. Reading the instructions and understanding them is always best before starting a project. My main concern I guess is that whatever I use will not lift off after parking the cars on it.

Ron, A vapor barrier was laid down before the slab was poured.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 05:42 pm:

Phil. The paint has been know to come off from hot tires. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 06:00 pm:

Go to the Garage Journal and search there:

https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/

Floor paint is their Kevlar!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 06:22 pm:

Whatever you use, it should have a maximum concrete slab moisture content indicated on the label. Be sure to let the concrete cure thoroughly and check the moisture content before applying the product (use a moisture meter). If there's too much moisture in the concrete the new finish will peel.

This is not usually a problem in an existing structure, but you said it's a new garage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

Henry, The slab was poured six weeks ago today. I know that it can take months for a slab to cure but never thought to test it with a moisture meter, that's a good tip.

Walter, I'll check out the Garage Journal forum and see what I can find out there.

Scott, That's exactly what I'm afraid of happening.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 08:00 pm:

Mine's coated with oil and grease. I just wipe it off every so often.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 08:17 pm:

ANY coating, wether straight single coat paint or a 2 part epoxy, will not stand up to floor jacks and steel horses. They all break down and become marred under heavy use. Actually the clear sealer you mentioned is your best bet. Stands up extremely well to heavy use and even deep scratches touch up very well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 08:48 pm:

Clear sealer is your best bet. Apply it with a garden sprayer. Check with your concrete guy- he will know a local source, or should.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 - 09:28 pm:

http://racedeck.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 12:21 pm:

Charlie and Dan, I like the idea of using clear sealer. I think it would also look better than paint. When they poured the slab I talked to the concrete contractor about sealers, he said there was a clear sealer that he would use but said that it took a special sprayer to apply that you can't rent. He also said a garden sprayer wouldn't work when I asked him about using one. I think he was just trying to get another $750.00 out of me for him to do it.

I'm going into town today and talk to someone at the local paint store. Also planning to find a masonry supply company and will talk to them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick mischler on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 05:28 pm:

Use a diamond clear urethane 3/8 nap roller thin coats 3 to5 coats it air dries so wait a week before you put anything on it it does not like brake fluid make sure your floors clean got anymore questions you can p.m. me


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick mischler on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 05:30 pm:

Use a diamond clear urethane 3/8 nap roller thin coats 3 to5 coats it air dries so wait a week before you put anything on it it does not like brake fluid make sure your floors clean got anymore questions you can p.m. me I operate a concrete plant


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

Phil, I used a clear sealer recommended by my concrete contractor primarily to eliminate evaporation right after it was pored in a very hot day. Grease and oil would wipe right up no problem BUT gasoline as well as any type of solvent will soften it and remove it. So whatever you use make sure solvents will not attach it. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 06:44 pm:

Phil L, Sorry, I don't have any recommendations for garage floor coatings. But I am glad to hear you are finally getting that thing built! Does this mean you will finally start getting that '14 touring put together? You began the hobby many years ago with a '14 touring car. And you need another one. Not that a Stutz wouldn't be nice, but I am afraid that isn't in the cards for you either.

Good luck, and have fun regardless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry LaPatka- East Tennessee on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

Phil,
Never had any of the two part epoxys work well regardless if acid etch or clean in any manner. My concrete contractor told me of the product that he uses that I purchased at the concrete plant in 5 gallon pails. Super seal 30 and it goes on with a roller and it is by far the finest concrete sealer that I have ever used or have heard that really works. Gasoline, diesel, oil
brake cleaner or anything else that has spilled just wipes right off with no stain. I had enamel overspray on the floor and used a mop and mineral spirits and it came right off. Reasonably priced also. Highly recommend it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Smith on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 07:31 pm:

Phil,
I hate to say it but you will get what you pay for with a garage floor coating. I have done stain, sealers, DIY epoxy and lastly paid for a commercial guy to put a very durable system down. The performance you might want is not cheap. You can always damage anything if you have enough force pounding on it. Also, if you weld it will discolor it. Mine will take all of the chemical abuse a general home mechanic might give it. Just wipe it off. A system like stonhard or amorcoat will get you there, but at say 5$/sf it adds up quickly. It can very a little less and a lot more if it is a cement based coating system. Just food for thought.
TS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 08:04 am:

In the late 1980s I worked for a mechanical contractor that did a bunch of Mobil branded service station upgrades. Mobil's specs called for concrete slabs to be treated with a mixture of 60% boiled linseed oil and 40% kerosene...a Google search will likely indicate that it was indeed an old-school treatment. It may not be as effective as some of the modern coatings, but there again I've never known anyone personally that was 100% satisfied with one of the modern products either..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins / St. Croix Valley Mn on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 08:20 am:

Tim Smith is exactly correct....you will get what you pay for. I have several friends who have been through all the work using various floor coating systems available at Home Depot/Menards etc. NONE have lasted more than two years without degrading badly. I hired a contractor who ground off the floor surface and did a four part epoxy process taking four days. This was ten years ago and my floor (after a light mopping) still looks like new. Cost in 2007 was $3.00/sq ft, now I am told it is about $4.00/sq ft. so I am having my condo storage floor done. Well worth it for the long term.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 08:30 am:

Just remember whatever you use after reading the pages of warnings come the directions, usually not more than a line or two.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 09:23 am:

I used Epoxy-Coat for both my garage and basement workshop. It is not cheap, but after almost 10 years it still looks great. It comes in many different colors and paint chip colors. Silica can be added for slip resistance. There are a couple of places where I drug something heavy and managed to scratch the surface, but in general it is extremely durable.

Put it down now, before you get a chance to spill oil on the floor, which would create "fish eyes" because it could not adhere to the concrete. You can get to their site by; https://www.epoxy-coat.com/

I have no connection to the company... just a very satisfied user.
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 12:20 pm:

I went to the local paint company yesterday, they carry Rustoleum "Rock Solid" clear sealer. It looks like a good product. They claim it's 20 times harder than epoxy, you apply it with a roller, drying time 12 to 16 hours. It will cost about $300.00, I'm still looking into it.

Thanks to Patrick, Larry and Michael for your recommendations I will research those products as well. There seems to be no lack of choices. Thanks to all the others with the their tips and recommendations.

Wayne, after waiting for over ten years now it will be nice to have a real garage. And yes you are correct after 48 years in the hobby I'm right back to where I started. It's funny how things work out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo, Milford MI on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 07:42 pm:

I have tried several, and within the cheap realm, the "utility floor paint" sold at Lowes works surprisingly well. We put it down in my brother's shop a few years ago and it is holding up very well. There are a few imperfections, and places a tire picked it up, but in general it works really well.

The mid grade epoxies are really a waste. Not much better, if at all than the Lowes oil paint, and much more expensive.

There is a product called "rust bullet" that many people rave about, but I have not tried it. It is expensive, but cheaper than the professional epoxies.

If you are considering the expensive professional epoxies, I think you would be better served to just lay porcelain tile. It costs about the same (or less if you do it yourself). That is what I put in my current shop. It doesn't care about solvents, and is tougher than any epoxy, and mops up clean. Worst part is the grout, which in hindsight I should have used epoxy grout, and went with a much darker color. It is hard enough to keep grout clean in a kitchen, it is impossible in the shop. People hear tile and worry about cracking, but it is a non issue on a concrete floor. Tiles crack when they bend, but if they are back-buttered and installed on a rigid concrete slab, they don't flex and are as tough as concrete. In the years I have had the floor tiled, I did chip 2 tiles when the guy operating the forklift dropped a 4000# lathe on it. I considered replacing them, but the chips are surprisingly small for what happened.

-Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 08:26 pm:

I help my brother put down grey garage paint and it came from a company who sells garage supplies. It last decent for several years and it's chipped and peeling some now from wear and abuse. I would use the clear because the grey looks rough when it gets beat up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Friday, October 06, 2017 - 08:18 am:

Concrete leaches the lime to the surface for about 3 months. If you paint the Crete before the process is complete it will lift the paint. You can test the lime on the surface by using a pool or hot tub test strip. A few drops of water on the Crete and dip the side of the strip in the water will tell you if it's ready for paint. Power wash when it's ready, let dry and paint. If you want to clear coat over your paint and your using epoxy paint the clear coat has to be put on before the epoxy has cured or the clear coat won't stick to the epoxy as it will be to slick. No one wants to scuff the floor before clear coating. Read the can. The paint company's have spent a lot of money on research so as not to have to warranty paint. I use awlgrip epoxy paint on my tow boats. Awesome product and bullet proof but to expensive to use on floors. It's all about prep and timing. Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Friday, October 06, 2017 - 11:20 am:

I wanna see a picture of your new garage!!!


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