Engine Rebuild

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Engine Rebuild
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Scott McNamara on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 07:08 am:

I need a recommendation for a good and reliable shop in the mid west that does T engine rebuilds. I live in Iowa and would like to know who you have used and would recommend in the surrounding states. Thanks in advance for your recommendations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 08:27 am:

A couple that spring to mind are Mike Bender in Tulsa and Joe Bell in Ohio. I believe Herm Kohnke in in the area too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Duquette Grand Forks, ND on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 08:37 am:

Kohnke's Machine and Repair. Clare, Iowa
Herm straightened a pan for me. Great work. They have a web site that details their engine work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 10:03 am:

Also Jack Putnam and Kevin Prus - both competent engine builders !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

Brian...I'm not saying this is your case, specifically, but in my opinion, an awful lot of "T"s get rebuilds when they really do not need them. I don't know if it is a pervasive belief that old engines need it or what, but I've seen a number of nice running engines, or engines which simply needed rods taken up, get sent out for rebuild. Do you really have issues which cannot be remedied over the course of a couple of weekends?

I see that you're a new poster and possibly a new owner, so wanted you to be certain of your actual need and know your options.

The builders already listed above would all be good choices if that is the route you really take.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Scott McNamara on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 07:38 pm:

I appreciate all the emails and responses. Thanks MTFCA. I have several leads to follow up on!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - 09:16 pm:

Sid Wells in Jacksonville, IL would be another great choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 12:00 am:

Guys,

my newly purchased 1923 touring, was running a little rough, so I bought a compression gauge from harbor freight, do you think I can trust the readings? hopefully I can, it tells me my engine needs some attention, especially number 4 cylinder. Any suggestions greatly appreciated, this is my first model T.

my son and I did a compression test on my 1923 Touring, here are the results:
dry
#1 30lbs
#2 30lbs
#3 29lbs
#4 0

Wet
#1 40lbs
#2 40lbs
#3 40lbs
#4 0

I'm guessing values need work, number 4, I guess, it's time to take the head off and pan, side cover and see what is going on...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 12:08 am:

When I pull the head off, is it best to run the engine and let it warm up first, or remove the bolts cold. I'm open for suggestions and guidance

Thanks in advance


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 12:22 am:

When I pull the head off, is it best to run the engine and let it warm up first, or remove the bolts cold. I'm open for suggestions and guidance

Thanks in advance

PS: I did purchase the repairing and restoring the model T Engine, along with the Model T Ford service manual CD.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 06:05 am:

Joseph,
You'll get the most answers by starting a new thread with your questions.

No need to warn up the engine before pulling the head.

You'll probably find valve problems with #4. If you have two dimples on each valve they're probably old two piece originals that tends to break in use now at age 90+, so they're recommended to be replaced all of them.
New valves are about $8 each at the vendors - check slop in the guides if you need to ream them and fit new valves with oversize stems. Chevy 350 V8 exhausts can be made to work too.

At that point you'll be deciding if you should hone the cylinders and put in new rings..

Just remember - the rings on original pistons goes all the way up, so you won't find any ridges even on a really worn out engine, so measuring is needed to determine wear. Originally the bores were 3.750"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 09:21 am:

Thanks Roger for your input..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 09:51 am:

It just me, But anytime your ready for a build I feel its a great time to get rid of the original crankshaft and replace it with a forged crankshaft. There has been more than a few guys that have joined the two piece club. What you cant see can and will ruin your day. I had George King do my engine. He did a very good job and Iv not had any trouble with it.. I'm planing on sending my 26 engine to Tom Carnegie. He builds T engines for the Montana 500. I feel that anyone that can build a engine to withstand 50 to 55 MPH for hours and hours can build an engine that would last 5 life times at 35 to 40 MPH!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 10:10 am:

Thanks for your input Will, that is good sound advice. I'm going to make this a father son project and tackle as much of the rebuild as we can together. I did Engine work when I was in the Navy some 45+ years ago, and lots of other mechanical through the years, my son is showing real interest in this project and wants to be involved. We haven't done much together in years, so this is my opportunity to do something together that we both will enjoy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Kowalczyk on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 10:20 am:

I moved my Engine questions to a new thread..

Engine rebuild father son project starts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, October 05, 2017 - 04:55 pm:

If you want fast service these guys will git 'er dun too.

https://www.metalcraftersinc.org/antique-engines


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