Trip to the Blacksmith Shop

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Trip to the Blacksmith Shop
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Instness on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:30 am:

I attended a great tour with the Mother Lode Model T Club this weekend. We spent a decent amount of time on a narrow, unpaved and in places somewhat rough road in the Sierra Nevada foothills. While the views were spectacular the road did bounce the Speedster around a little and eventually put a significant crack in my front fender brace. A quick roadside fix involving some bailing wire provided enough support to hold the fender off the tire until the next town. It must have been fate that our lunch stop in the small town of Foresthill CA, happened to be next door to a modern era blacksmith shop. The owner of the shop kindly offered to weld the brace back together and did a great job. Though a 1920s blacksmith may not have had a welder on hand, I found it very fitting that my Model T was repaired at the blacksmith shop. I ended the tour with another great Model T experience and story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 01:51 am:

Great story! As soon as I opened the thread, I knew it was a local. Very nice speedster that I have seen before.
Enjoy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 03:23 am:

Whether a blacksmith in the twenties would have welded in interesting to me. My uncle, Lester Parker (1891-1958) partnered with O'Neal, an older blacksmith who had been in business locally at least since the nineties. Lester later taught blacksmithing and welding at Chilocco, so I assume he picked up the welding part sometime after the Great War (in the army he was a cook, not a welder).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 06:48 am:

Neat story and experience. Thanks for posting it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 06:50 am:

What a nice-looking car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 08:23 am:

Great looking speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 09:41 am:

The time limit on editing is annoying. Of course I meant to say "is interesting".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 09:47 am:

Steve,Another thought is how many blacksmith shops in the 20's had elect power??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 09:55 am:

Kenneth,
Before Rural Electrification, probably not many.

Although Arc welding was developed in 1907 and Lincoln was building their buzz boxes since 1912, I'm guessing Oxy-acetylene or hammer welding was the mainstay of the guy standing under Longfellow's "...spreading Chestnut tree...".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 10:30 am:

Thanks for that factoid on arc welding, Dale. I had no idea it went back that far ! Oxy-acetylene was rapidly adopted, and would likely have been available in most shops in the 20s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 10:47 am:

Is there a single factory weld on a model T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 11:24 am:

Differential ring gears started as a steel bar bent in a circle and resistance welded to form the circular blank. (There are some old Ford factory films of that process.)The inside window moldings on my '26 are resistance welded at the corners. As far as stick welds,spot welds, etc, I defer. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 11:39 am:

John, yes. Radius rods and steering rods, at least some of them. I suppose the brass splattered on oil pans also qualifies as welding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:10 pm:

I was looking forward to this run but family matters keep me from going. Glad you got it fixed on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 08:43 pm:

Brazing and soldering are not 'welding' b/c there is no fusion of the base metal, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, October 16, 2017 - 09:43 pm:

Before oxy-acetylene, blacksmiths would also braze parts using the open forge . . .


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration