Oil line concensus

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Oil line concensus
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 07:28 pm:

Guys, who has an interior and who has an exterior oil line? Which one should I put in my engine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 07:45 pm:

You can put both


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 08:14 pm:

I have both.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 08:17 pm:

Always use the stock internal line. That gets oil into the timing gear. Outside line is an accessory an adds more oil to the front of the pan that then runs thru the dips. Either, Mag post, trans access cover oiler(ford faithful) or off the side of the hogs head that the vendors sell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 08:31 pm:

I only have the original inside line. Well, not original. It's a repro with the large funnel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 09:38 pm:

Always run with the Ford inside oil line, large funnel type.
Any additional oil line of your choice, ether inside or outside is a real plus. I can't count the number of engines I have rebuilt that were still running with an additional line, that the Ford inside oil line was plug up. Just my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 09:52 pm:

I agree, do both for the reasons mentioned above unless you are doing a correct restoration or something and don't want to see it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

There are inside oil lines that are sold by Lang's and others that you will never be seen after the inspection cover is in place. Just food for thought.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

They make a right and a left.

inside oil line


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 11:50 pm:

I run the stock internal with a large funnel, and a pair of the internal accessory lines like the one in the picture above when running the common cast magneto ring. On earlier engines with pressed steel magneto rings this style accessory internal oiler won't fit so i run a Ford Faithful external oiler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 12:00 am:

I have an exterior line. -So far, so good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 04:00 am:

Thank you everyone


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 04:07 am:

I use an upsized internal pipe with a large funnel attached. Care to be used when bending pipe for the funnel so as not to collapse it.

Care also to line up file when enlarging out the internal (middle) hole with a round file. This is done by fitting the tang of the file into a smaller pipe that runs out the block in one of the end holes.

End holes can be drilled, but must be 'slanted' to keep oil line holes lined up.

Found that it is easiest to lay block on its side oil line side down.

It is a bit of fiddling but gives increased oil flow all safe inside the block - no external pipes to get knocked or dented.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 07:13 am:

Doug, I show and drive my 1911 a lot. You should not have a outside oil line when on shown. I use the stock inside line with a larger funnel on the end. I also use the set ( right and left ) inside oil lines that Lang's sells. They work very well.
They are easy to install.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 07:22 am:

I will add that I run wooden bands. They do not produce any "Fuzz" that could clog an oil line. If I ran cotton or Kevlar, I might be more concerned about an auxiliary oil line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 11:13 am:

I can say good things about the magneto post oiler. You do the least modifications to the engine and it works. I have proof of this because after installing a rebuilt engine in my car, I took it out for a drive and the first day, the magneto stopped working. I switched to battery and drove it on battery for 10 years including week long tours. I also live in the mountains and have steep grades to my house. About 10 years later I was restoring another T and decided to rewind the magneto coils. At the same time I rewound one for the first T which I described above. I pulled the engine and found the funnel off the internal oiler laying at the bottom of the crankcase. When it came off, it cut the coils and caused magneto failure. So I had been driving the car for 10 years with only the internal line without the funnel and the magneto post oiler. I installed the rewound coil and a new inside oil line. I took out a shim or two from the rod bearings and put everything back together. Car still runs 27 years later.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 11:32 am:

I live in the mountains of West Virginia and I wouldn't think of driving a Model T without an outside magneto post oiler. You can get to them easily and clean them out if need be without taking the pan down. There are no funnels to fall off either. You're starving that front bearing if you aren't putting oil up there...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, AZ on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 11:37 am:

Norm’s experience is a good case for having both internal and external oil lines. You would be surprised at how much oil mag. post oilers will flow. I once cut my mag post oiler tubing and temporarily placed a clear tygon tubing “window” in the line to verify oil flow. Was impressed by the flow of oil visible even at idle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 12:02 pm:

I live in the mountains of West Virginia and I wouldn't think of driving a Model T without an outside magneto post oiler. You can get to them easily and clean them out if need be without taking the pan down. There are no funnels to fall off either. You're starving that front bearing if you aren't putting oil up there...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 12:02 pm:

I have no clue why my message got posted twice... Other than I must be getting old! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 12:05 pm:

My experience (Limited as it is) was quite the opposite. My truck had a mag post oiler when I got it. I disconnected the engine end of it and it was drier than a popcorn phart. It was doing absolutely nothing. Others report they do well. I have no idea what make this one was. Obviously, others seem to work well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 03:27 pm:

I am with Hal, I lost a ten dollar bet years ago when I just got into the hobby, I was bragging it up and some old boy bet me ten bucks it was not doing a thing, I thought that was a sucker bet and I was the sucker! I since have seen many of them out there and some of the old ones had enough room that I think some oil may make it to the front. I like the big scoop on the outside of the hogshead myself, I know those work!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 12:47 am:

Put both on but i ran double outside lines and in pump oil so pic one of each


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 09:57 pm:

Here is an interesting thread I posted in 2012 regarding an outside oil line that was installed on my engine in 1977 by the inventor, Jess Bonar. Jim Patrick

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/313252.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Friday, October 20, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

After a slpit head caused me to do a full teardown, i found my internal line had a 1+" gash it it, and had been 'repaired, by just crimping a piece of Tim around it. Major fail#1. Major fail #2 , was the outside line was partially plugged (Was a magneto post version). Lack of oil was evident by the front half of the engine internals, being rusty, with badly scoured babbit!

The rebuilt engine I got from Tim Bell has an over-size outside tube, off the side of the hogshead. I'm much more confident of it, doing the truck!

I will always run with at least an additional outside tube now.... just deoending on one (wherever it bay lie), seems to me to be asking for trouble. Part of my seasonal check, now, after an oil change will be to drop the oil pan inspection plate ... and look for rust! LOL.... well... just look for signs of good lubrication. I suppose disconnecting the front commection(at least loosening it) and running the engine for a bit... would go a long way to prove too myself the outside line, at least... is still doing It's job. I'll obviously, I'll do that after replacing the oil pan inspection plate, and filing with oil! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 11:20 pm:

I disconnected my mag post outside oil line, because it barely delivered oil to the front, due to the small opening between the end of the hollow fitting and the mag post. As far outside oil lines go, the flywheel force feed scoop type is the most effective and dependable one on the market. The only downside is that it requires you to drill a hole in your hogshead and a hole in the side of your block, but if you want results and the reassurance that the front half of your engine will be well oiled, it is well worth it. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Monday, October 23, 2017 - 12:01 am:

I routed my right sided flywheel scoop type line from the right side of the hogshead to the front of the inspection pan on my 23. I didn't drill into the block and hope it works in the event of the internal line failing. Been running over 4 years so far with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Monday, October 23, 2017 - 12:26 am:

That's a good idea Noel for folks that are adverse to drilling holes in their block, but it defeats the purpose of one of the most appealing aspects of the force fed hogshead scoop oiler, which is the tremendous pressure that is attained as the oil enters the crankcase between #1 and #2 bearings, whereby the whole front half of the crankcase is sprayed in oil, unlike the mag post entry point at the front that reduces the pressure by pointing the tube downward into the pan, but be that as it may, having your setup being fed by the hogshead oiler is many times more effective than having it fed by the mag post oiler. :-) Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, October 23, 2017 - 11:21 am:

The Texas T Parts "high-volume" oiler requires holes to be made in the hogshead and crankcase, not the block.


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