Outside Oil Line Best Practices?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Outside Oil Line Best Practices?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 01:37 pm:

Hi all, my outside oil line kit just came in the mail and I'm hoping to install it sometime this week. It's one of the mag post type with the hollow bolt for the outlet into the front end of the case. It's also the later type which has the mag post thread on instead of bolting on.

The instructions are complete and certainly enough to get it stuck on, I was just wondering if there were any tricks to get even better performance from it. Things like clocking the mag post and elbow, any beneficial grinding inside, maybe switching from a copper outside line to steel, etc.

Any tricks or is it good enough as-is?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 01:51 pm:

Your title says Best Practices... IMO that would be one of the scoops mounted on the side of the hogshead. Since you already have the mag post style your ideas are good. While your in the midst of the install, test out the flow at the front. Many guys have a real surprise. Good Luck and your on the right track. Some guys say you don't need anything outside...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 01:53 pm:

Tim, spending a little time with a die grinder to open up the pretty restrictive opening makes a big difference in my opinion. Some here say that these don't pump much oil, but mine seems to work quite well. Also, changing out the 90 degree fitting for a 45 might also help a little, although i just left the fitting it came with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 01:58 pm:

I agree with what John said. I learned that trick from my Model T mentor a long time ago. I have sight glasses in the outside oil lines on my T's and can see how much oil is going through them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 08:09 pm:

I like the idea of swapping the elbow out for a 45* unit. Since mine is a 26-27 type that screws in like a spark plug there's not much material that can be removed from the inside so that's probably out. I saw on an earlier thread that some of them could have the elbow screwed in far enough to impede flow inside and even short the mag which I've already checked can't happen on mine.

Good idea to fire up the car with the line dumping into a catch can to see just how much oil it moves. I figure any extra oil moving to the front of the case is an improvement, especially since I don't know the state of the inside line. I'm fairly confident it's not 100% blocked but my transmission made a lot of lint while I was getting things adjusted and running (old bands, will be installing Kevlar soon) and I think this is a place where I'm better safe than sorry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 02:27 am:

I agree with Gene. The hogshead oil scoop system in which the rapidly revolving flywheel force feeds oil into a scoop mounted in line with the flywheel at the 11:00 position on the hogshead and floods the front of the crankcase with oil is, by far, the best outside oil line system ever developed for the Model T. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Leach on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 11:10 am:

I had a incident with a mag post outside oiler several years ago when the copper line broke at the front. Pumped all the oil out of the engine in short order. The copper line will fracture after a while. So you might consider replacing it ever so often or using steel line. I run both mag post & hogshead oilers on all mine. With steel lines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 11:18 am:

Thanks Craig, switching to steel was on my mind too. What I'll likely do is start with the copper line then use it as a pattern for bending a steel replacement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 11:25 am:

I am installing the scoop type hogs head oiler on mine. We have a block in the shop that was drilled to install the front of the oil line just behind the the timing gear casting on the drivers side. I am thinking of doing the same thing on my block. The casting that comes with the kit directs the oil to the first dipper tray, I want to make sure the oil gets to the front bearing as the hole for it is on the front side just behind the timing gear. My other choice is to split the line in front and run to the pan and that location. My line of thought is if the inside line gets pluged I want oil getting to the front bearing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 11:53 am:

Tim

If your accessory mag oiler is Lang's then these use a different schedule of copper line that is thick wall, unlike the std. thin wall sold in hardware stores for water line. That thick wall copper won't work harden easily either. But it is a bit stiff to bend to curve shape around the block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 11:56 am:

Regarding the hogshead scoop type, I have one of the first prototypes installed in 1977 by the inventor, Jess Bonar. The tube leading from the scoop is about 3/8" while I believe the tubes these days are 1/4". I think the 3/8" makes a big positive difference in performance of the system. Jim Patrick

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/313252.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By WilliamThomas Forsythe on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 01:16 pm:

Tim:

My two cents worth as per the photos: I use 1/2" copper tubing and nice copper elbows at each end to provide a continuous unrestricted flow of oil into the front of the pan. I've used this approach on several engines with total customer satisfaction. Regards; Tomcustom outside oilers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 02:45 pm:

Tim, when using the magneto type oiler, if you change the fitting to a different type, after tightening, make sure to grind the end of the fitting off as close to the inside wall of the magneto post housing as possible for (2)reasons: (1) to be sure you have as large an opening as possible for as much oil as possible to go through. (2) be sure the end of the fitting does not come close and possibly make contact with the magneto post and short it out.

It looks like you have a lot of room on the inside of your brass housing, but the later screw-in design does not have nearly so much room between the post and the inside wall of the post housing and it is this later design that is so inefficient and prone to shorting out the magneto post. This is because the wall of the later magneto post housing is much thinner than the earlier brass ones, which only allows for about two threads of the fitting to catch. Also, with the thinner wall, when you tighten the fitting, it goes much deeper than the earlier brass, entering the hollow interior of the housing and possibly making contact with the post. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 02:53 pm:

Have the alum casting for the hogshead and pan on the '27 too, but used hydraulic high pressure oil-resistant hose instead of metal tubing. Easy to route and lasts.





Double hose clamps on the barbed fittings for more security too :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

Those mag. Plug oilers are next to having none.

The Hogs head ones are the ones to use!

Herm.


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