1911 torpedo questions

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 1911 torpedo questions
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 05:21 pm:

A friend just got the shipping invoice on his car. It states that the car has a "C" head. Anyone know what that signifies? Bob also told me that he just learned that engines used in the torpedo had higher compression, and a lighter flywheel. Can anyone verify that? I never heard that before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 09:28 pm:

I'm no expert, but I've never read that in any of the books I've seen on Model T's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike-Iowa on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 09:47 pm:

RV, I have an original 1911 Torpedo. The engine is restored but is not fully assembled. It is basic 1911 T engine, nothing unusual at all. I would say that what is being implied is a myth, probably a misconception about the otherwise uniqueness of the Torpedo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Wednesday, November 01, 2017 - 10:19 pm:

Sounds like the cylinder head is the T-401C version. McCalley's Model T Encyclopedia shows that as being used with the T-400B thermo-siphon cylinder block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, November 02, 2017 - 10:45 am:

I was pretty sure that this was another myth, but Bob seemed happily adamant.

Thanks for the info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, November 02, 2017 - 07:22 pm:

R.V.,

Actually your friend probably was told or shown what is on page 114 of Clymer's book "Henry's Wonderful Model T 1908-1927." It states for 1910:

"No changes were offered except for the new Torpedo Roadster; a racy looking car (Fig. 4) which featured very low doors, curved front and rear fenders, and a 16-gallon fuel tank and a toolbox mounted on rear deck. The long, 61 inch steering column and the windshield were set at a very rakish angle to carry out the suggestion of speed. And, with its high compression engine, light flywheel (including magneto), and very light, low body, this car had undoubtedly the best performance and greatest speed of all Model T Fords ever produced."

Note, they had some things right and a few off a little on other items.

First, the Torpedo Roadster was not a 1910 Model year car. Instead it was a 1911 Model year car that was produced as early as late calendar year 1910. Ref page 491 of Bruce's "Model T Ford" where Torpedo is listed Dec 10, 1910 and following dates.

Second, if your friend has a Torpedo Roadster with and engine produced before the factory drawing date of
03-14-11 T401C Increased compression space by 3/32" then it does have more compression than the engines that used the head after the compression space was increased which decreased the compression ratio.

And even if it was after that, it still would be higher than most Ts as the compression ratio was lowered again by the drawing dated 07-17-14 T401C Added 3/32 to bottom of head, increases all top to bottom dimensions and lowers compression.
And of course the high head reduced the compression ratio even more.

Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/E.htm#eng3
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/E.htm#eng3

Third, I think he missed on when the torpedo roadster was available -- starting Dec 10, 1910 with serial number 34,333 and when the magnets on the flywheel were enlarged from 9/16 to 5/8 inch.
From: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/I-O.htm#mag1 it has:

1909
(17,501-20,500) [cars manufactured Mar 10, 1910 - Apr 8, 1910]
Coil is similar to the earlier type but no longer has the holes in the pressed-steel mounting ring. Magnets are similar to the earlier type but now 9/16 thick.

1910-1914
At #20,501 The magneto was redesigned. The coil ring is now a casting and again has the holes near the coils. The coils are still double-stacked. The magnets are of the simple bent type and are now 5/8 thick.

But what I do not know from the summary above, is did switching to the thicker magnets change the weight of the flywheel? I don't know. I am guessing that Floyd Clymer believed the 1910 flywheel was lighter than the later 1911 flywheel based on the increased thickness of the magnets. But I do not know if they machined more metal off the flywheel and the weight remained the same or not.

While the engine in the Torpedo Roadsters and Open Runabouts was the same as the other T's at the same production time frame, the brake and low speed/clutch pedal are different. http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/328567.html?1356261530 .

For other items that are different please see the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/395252.html?1382363916

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Friday, November 03, 2017 - 05:24 pm:

Im not sure about the torpedo but my original 1911 openrunabout and came with a low head and is supposed to put out 22 hp. Im not sure about the lighter flywheel but it doesnt have a ring gear and that alone would make it a little lighter.


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