Letter in Joe Galamb 1905

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Letter in Joe Galamb 1905
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 11:24 am:

I help needed identifying the content of a letter that Joe Galamb received from The Olds Motor Works in July 1905. I have not been able read the three letters that I have as we donít know what language was used. This is when Joe was working in Cleveland, Ohio at Sterns Automotive building carburetors for their cars. Joe did not get a job with Olds and instead went to work for Harris Automatic Press in Niles Ohio. All of this was prior to starting at Ford in December 1905.

If anyone can read this hand writing it might answer some additional questions about Joeís past.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Magee on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 11:31 am:

Bruce,

Joe Galamb was Hungarian.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 11:42 am:

I know that, but he was also fluent in French and German


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Seress, Prescott Az. on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 11:44 am:

I was able to read most of the letter in Hungarian but some of the words are obscure. I will post the translation as soon as I have some time. Frank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 11:47 am:

Here is the envelope the letter was in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 02:21 pm:

It amazes me how neat the scrip is, The scrip seems to flow like water. Iv found this to be true on many hand written letters Iv read from the early 1900's. By comparison hand written notes today are sometimes unreadable. I wonder if somewhere in between times we have forgotten the art of how to place pen to paper, Me included. Back in my 20's I knew a guy that could almost make the written letter look like music.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Seress, Prescott Az. on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 03:32 pm:

Bruce, sent you a questionable translation. Sorry but it wont help shed any light on his business dealings but a lot on his personal life, if you can make any sense of it. Frank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 03:45 pm:

Frank, I thank you for your help ! Here is the second letter, I have a box of letters from Joe's family and others in Hungarian and could use a translator every now and then. The letters date from before he and my Grandfather came over on the boat together in the fall of 1903. They had been working at the Adler factory in Frankfurt Germany. They go until 1955 when Joe passed away. They were given to Trent Boggess and I went I introduced Trent to Joe's daughter Gloria. Unfortunately Gloria in no longer with us, but will always be in our thoughts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 03:58 pm:

Will,
Years ago when I was forced to take a penmanship class ( what your parents won't think is important!) the instructor said do not write the letters, draw them. I think Joe was, in his mind, painting them. A wide tip fountain pen also adds to the effect. I see some people today using a chissel nose felt pen to get a similar style.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

Looking at that envelope I am surprised the post office was able to deliver it. Must have been some very good people working back then, and I think they would have been proud to give this to the correct person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Davis on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 07:57 pm:

And now days public schools don't even teach cursive writing, it looks like he was using a old ink dip pen. it is a lot art, many draftsmen and engineers used that style in drawing up blue prints before computers and Cad took over


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 08:15 pm:

Kids these days donít write.
My grandson is as smart as a whip, attending UCSD in pre-med and has never written anything other than notes, in his life. They use computers and iPhones for all their communication needs. Why waste the time to learn when differential calculus and C programming are much more important to their future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 08:25 am:

In the first paragraph the letter says; "Mom having fun at camp." "Please send clean underwear and socks." "Please also send some money for the snack bar"

Your Loving Son.
Little Joey


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 09:44 am:

Where did you find this letter?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 10:02 am:

They came from Joe Galamb's youngest Daughter Gloria. Here is one of the oldest envelopes.He and my Grandfather were working at Adler Motor at the time when they with their other friend Mano Fischhof planed to go to the 1904 World's Fair in St Louis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 10:30 am:

Scarcely anyone under 50 holds a pen or pencil correctly now. They usually "monkey-fist" the implement in unsympathetic awkward ways, more often than not the results are illegible. The most important benefit of learning good penmanship is development of fine motor skills in young kids. I hope they are somehow making up for this lapse in other ways now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 01:23 pm:

Bruce,

Hopefully you'll post the translations when available?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

Jerry,
Letter one, Thank you Frank !
Every pice of the puzzle helps !

Bruce.
The letter is extremely difficult to decipher due to the way they spoke those days, the familiarity between these friends and the run together words, letters, sentences and close to
unrecognizable writing. This is the jest of it. Has nothing to do with business and a lot of it does not make any sense. You would have to have known these friends to understand the letter.
My dear friend.
Please do not be mad at me for the visit we missed with you on sunday. I am very embarrassed but you know it was devil bad weather. I received a telephone call to go see Sofon (?). He is coming to prove that we are good friends and Mario indifferent good luck. I am writing about a good place good with Eva but I feel good. As far as I am concerned about this devilish heat I will make up my mind. Julius made a vacation to niagara falls and I hope we can bring it together and I am preparing to go to him. We will again be together. God be with you.
Hug you your loving friend. Signature
I wish it would have made more sense than it does but that is the best I could do with the holographic presented. Frank

Mario could be Mano Fischhof, who came over on the boat (S.S. Finland) with Joe Galamb, and Charles Balough, and Julius could be Jules Haltenberger, who also worked in the Secret Room on the Model T. All class mates from school in Budapest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Seress, Prescott Az. on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:07 pm:

Jerry, you are right, I should have simply posted the translation on the forum. The letters are not personal or secret business dealings. I will do that on the next letter.
Bruce, can you send the second letter to my email, but, can you darken it a little, it is very light and even harder to read than the first one. Frank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:21 pm:

Frank - is this better ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:33 pm:

letter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Bunyip on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:59 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 04:23 am:

All I can say is, what amazing history.

I love history we can touch - even if we can't read it.

Beautiful.

Thank you Bruce.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:36 am:

Here is the letter head from a letter to my Grandfather Charles Balough. I love the letter head !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:37 am:

Here is the front of that letter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:41 am:

And the envelop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 12:55 pm:

I found some of that fancy writing in a bible I got today I bought on eBay. Whoever wrote that Barbary Smith died in 1893 was pretty fancy. Whoever wrote Adam Schmidt underneath used the old german script. My great grandmother and aunt used to write like that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 01:16 pm:

Another translation from Pal in Hungary,

It's not easy to read. Joe-1 is about a visit, which was "almost sure to happen" but had to be cancelled at the last minute. Mano is a Draftsman at various places. I also feel fine, apart from the conditions (I can read about half of the reason why the meeting had to be cancelled). I am looking forward to our excursion to the Niagara falls together.

Joe-2 is from a certain "Pista" which is a nickname of IstvŠn. Who was IstvŠn :-)? Anyhow, he also talks about how sorry he is that he can't attend the meeting and talks about the possibilities of meeting up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 04:49 am:

When i was a kid about 10 years old, I had a friend whose mother had absolutely the most beautiful handwriting that I have ever seen. As said, it was like she was painting the letters. I never could write very good, now it's even worse! :-( I finally gave up trying to make my signature legible, nobody else does. Doesn't seem to make much difference anymore anyway. Sorry for the thread drift. Dave


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration