Fuse blowing- ideas please

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Fuse blowing- ideas please
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ross-Maysville, KY on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

Getting closer to starting my rebuilt engine. Reconnected the battery and wiring (except mag post, horn, and lights).
I've added a fuse kit from the vendors and when I hooked up the battery, it sparked(at battery) and blew the fuse. I replaced the fuse and it blew but no sparks this time). Other than the fuse kit, I added an original starter switch. I just tested it to make sure it worked with a test light and it did. I did not open it up. Other than the fuse kit, I've replaced the coil box lid and had the generator rebuilt.
Ideas please?- I'm thinking of bypassing the switch and going from there. Any input appreciated as always.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 08:37 pm:

OK so where does the fuse fit into the system? Does it come off the Positive cable side of the starter switch and go up to the junction block on the fire wall? Are any of the unconnected wires touching anything? Is the generator cutoff relay wire connected? Really Rick, what you need to do is eyeball the harness and disconnect whatever is hooked up until you find the short. The only thing you mention that you've actually messed with is the generator so I'd start there with removing the relay wire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 08:49 pm:

Double check that the screw holding the wire on the generator isn't too long and shorting against generator case.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ross-Maysville, KY on Sunday, November 05, 2017 - 08:51 pm:

Thanks for the ideas. I'll check and let you know!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 10:22 am:

Perhaps you should consider removing the fuse! Model T's don't use them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Barrett - Anderson, IN on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 10:25 am:

The easiest way to check for a ground. Disconnect the positive battery lead and connect a light bulb of the same voltage rating in series with the lead. Try to get a large wattage bulb. You can connect several bulbs in parallel to increase the wattage. If the bulbs are bright, you have a short. Start disconnecting one wire at a time until the test lights dim or go out.

Its as easy as Pie. P=I*E. Watts = Amps * Volts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

I'm more a purist than most and certainly more a purist than most on here care for me to be, HOWEVER, a fuse is a REALLY good idea on a Model T! It can make the difference between an enjoyable hobby and burning down the house with your family inside! The very fact that you are blowing the fuse is evidence that it was needed! Just removing it is bad advice, IMHO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 12:47 pm:

Something is shorted or wired incorrectly otherwise you wouldn't blow the fuse. I agree with Hal Find and fix do not remove the fuse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

Rod is on target with finding the short. That is the easiest and fastest way to find the issue. Once yo find the offending circuit, do a continuity test (make sure the circuit is free of battery power) on the circuit until you find the short. Pinched and chaffed wires are a common cause.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 01:38 pm:

A good example of how modifications can mess things up.

If you wish to have a reliable T for driving then all electrical components should be tested and installed in working condition married with an original style wiring harness and then you will have zero problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

Larry,

"Perhaps you should consider removing the fuse! Model T's don't use them."

Yes, nothing like a good original, authentic, electrical fire. ;O)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ross-Maysville, KY on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 03:31 pm:

Thank you all for the ideas. I'll get on it this week and report back on what I find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 05:07 pm:

Jerry, I almost fell out of my chair laughing so hard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ross-Maysville, KY on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:25 pm:

Well it ended up being the generator screw was grounding out! Easy fix! Thanks to mtfca for saving me hours of frustration! Coils are buzzing!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Monday, November 06, 2017 - 06:32 pm:

Same thing was happening when we (martynnVowell and I) . At the time we couldn't find a shorter screw so we put a few washers under the screw. Worked like a charm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:32 am:

I rest my case. Without the fuse, that would have been a VERY hot wire. What would have happened is anybody's guess, but it COULD have been bad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 08:21 am:

Well you might as well ditch the generator and switch to an alternator and have a modern fuse block put in so the garage won't burn down. Get some LED lights as well after you install the seat belts. When your done with all that be sure to get a distributor put on and throw out the coils. Surely you have disk brakes in all four corners, right? I'm sure you could pay someone to fab up some air bags as well...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 08:59 am:

Tim, That's a bit snarky. Sure, a fuse was not original, but that doesn't mean it wouldn't benefit from one. As Hal said, without the fuse the wire in question would have gotten very hot, and possibly caused a fire.

Many people find a side mirror, brake lights and turn signals make driving safer, even though none were original equipment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 09:26 am:

Rick, Good to hear you've fixed your shorting issue. Be sure to keep us posted on your progress with your T. We like pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 09:39 am:

Those fuse kits are 30 Amp usually. In this case, without the fuse that wire would have turned bright red very quickly and burned off the insulation. Once burning, it may not have stopped until the house or garage were gone along with the car.

Here's one for the originality police to ponder. When these cars were new, were the original owners as dead set against such small mods? And if they weren't against it (originally) how does being against it today wash with what was "back in the day"? Just wondering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 09:55 am:

Gary, Back in the day automobiles where stored in out buildings away from the house. Garage fires were not uncommon. I am not ashamed to say turn signals, brake lights, outside review mirrors and in line fuses are used on my T's. I believe my families safety far outweighs originality when it comes to a 90 year old car. But to each his own.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 10:06 am:

Just a reminder, if you have an original 1919 early closed car, they came with the first electrical system with storage battery, and those Ford models Had a fuse!

Later that fuse was deleted, likely to save money, or else the engineers figured it wasn't important. Today we know different.





So various aftermarket fuse holders were sold to owners who know that smoking wires are not good.



For me, never added a fuse, years ago had smoking amp wire connector behind the dash. It was frayed and fried, so I saw wire smoke for the first time.

A couple of years ago I had just added an accessory dash lamp to my '26 oval switch plate, the kind that ran wire behind the plate between the dash.

When out to the garage later that day and smelled smoke! What the heck. That wire had been chaffed with my install....my mistake, but could have burned down the garage! The '26 has its gas tank right there!! Yikes.

So all my T's have Fun Projects fuse at the battery wire at the foot switch :-)



Remember, Smokey the T says: Prevent Model T wire fires.....add a Fuse :-)


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