Haven't seen one of these before

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Haven't seen one of these before
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Howard ( Australia) on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 12:39 am:

Just sortin' through the heap of exhaust manifolds and found this one.. what's the story here ? And how come there is always a heap of intake and exhaust manifolds in every T collection? I reckon Henry must have made 15 million cars and 30 million exhaust manifolds !!!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 12:45 am:

Not Ford. Some kind of aftermarket accessory, or perhaps for a similar car like a Metz.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Howard ( Australia) on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 01:20 am:

I was wondering if it was for some sort of pre- heating chamber , as one would expect, say, to run on Power Kerosene ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 02:53 am:

Not Metz. The Metz exhaust manifold has no opening between ports two and three, and is not threaded at its opening for the exhaust pipe.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Howard ( Australia) on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 04:50 am:

It corresponds precisely with a standard T manifold..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 05:21 am:

Itís a Holley.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Howard ( Australia) on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 05:31 am:

Thanks Ed... I knew someone would provide an answer...another little increase in knowledge of the seemingly infinite universe of T variations.. wonder how much I can absorb before my head explodes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:37 am:

Exploding Heads ....

Sounds like a great name for an MTFCA Chapter .....

FJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:41 am:

Now who has the matching intake manifold?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:47 am:

Hereís what it looks like
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/246272.html?1320865366


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 08:46 am:

It just shows that this is the place to ask.
Ed, nice work.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 12:00 pm:

It is interesting how much that Metz engines looks like a Model T engine!

What year was that Metz engine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 12:21 am:

Hi James,

The engine pictured in the parts book is 1913. The other Metz engine is a 1914 and is equipped with the optional and seldom seen starter and generator package.

At first glance, the Metz and Model T engines do look much the same due to the layout of the exhaust and intake manifolds and the similar cylinder head. (Note that the water outlet on the Metz has the mounting bolts oriented vertically instead of horizontally as on the Ford.)

There are several major differences between the two engines. While the Model T came as a sensation in the low priced field with its one piece engine block, the Metz retained older style practice with the cylinder assembly separate from the upper crankcase. The engine has a gear driven oil pump at the back end of the camshaft. The oil is directed into a tray. The connecting rods have dippers cast into the rod caps and the rods move through this oil filled tray at the low point of their travel. The lower crankcase (Metz called it an oil tank) is cast aluminum. It is a decent little engine and somewhat peppy. I don't know what the compression ratio is, but, as the combustion chamber is smaller than the Ford's and the Metz has the same bore and stroke it is likely a bit higher.


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