Night Driving in New York State

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Night Driving in New York State
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

I had assumed that one couldn't drive an antique car at night in New York State ... but I decided to see if I could find the actual rules. Actually I didn't find anything that says that night driving is illegal. I'm a transplant from Pennsylvania and many years ago I remember a rule of no driving between dusk and dawn. So is there anyone out there from New York that has the official NY rules for driving antique cars on paper?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dominic Denio on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 04:57 pm:

Mark,

You can check by calling the New York State Police Troop HQ Traffic Section in Canandaigua at 716 398 3328 or NYSP HQ Traffic Section in Albany at 518 457 3258.

Have a great day


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 05:46 pm:

The bulbs and reflectors on our cars were current technology through 1939. If it were illegal, there are many cars besides the Model T that wouldn't be able to drive at night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 06:14 pm:

No driving what after dark? Did it specify years or what? 25 & older is classic (read antique) in a lot of states so would say a 70's car not be allowed out at night?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 06:23 pm:

As long as you have proper lights on your antique car you can drive st night so the idiots can see you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 06:46 pm:

There may be a difference between what is legal and what is smart.
I would make sure that there is lots of lights, especially in the rear.
Flashing yellow lights make sense on a slow vehicle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 07:19 pm:

Sure ... Iím to going out to drive the T at night on a regular basis with the stock lights. Just curious if I get caught and need to drive home sometime after the sun sets. I live in the city and the street lights give better visibility than the lights on the T. At least I have a good foot activated brake light.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 09:17 pm:

If it's legal, I would drive a T in the city with street lights and a slow speed limit, however, I would not drive it on dark roads with a higher speed limit unless I had many lights especially on the back. The reason, is that most drivers don't expect a black car with one small tail light on the rear and before they realize how slow it is going would rear end it. On one recent tour, we had a barbecue at a member's home which ended after dark. This was an out of town tour and we had to travel several miles to our motel. We all went in a group with a modern car in front and another modern car in back with flashers. No problem. Another tour we went a few blocks from a restaurant to the motel on slow city streets without a problem.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 12:36 am:

Fred's distinction between legal and smart is on the mark. There's no law against me driving with magneto lights, and I'll do it occasionally in town. That's a setting so well lit that my weak headlights don't matter. But night driving on an unfamiliar country road is just too scary and dangerous, even if it's legal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 07:35 am:

I wonder how many other T owners on this forum live in a city like me. I moved here from a more rural area in eastern Pennsylvania 18 years ago. Was quite a transition for me on many levels. I used to have many rural roads for pleasure driving and plenty of space for working on the car ... barn storage and a farm workshop.

Now my T is in a small unheated two car garage that was built in 1919 for a model T era car. Half of the garage has a table saw, band saw belt sander and drill press; plus storage for all the junk we all like. But it's not easy to work in there. All my T work is done in the driveway. With the cold weather coming ... it's difficult to do anything out there so "units" come into the house for fixing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 08:18 am:

My dad was a State Trooper in Florida. When he was teaching me about driving he said LOOK OUT! you can be right but you can also be dead right! FWIW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 10:26 am:

Mark check out Park Ave bike shop they have the real bright led lights that you can see from a real distance


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 10:31 am:

Mark, if you install the new and better headlight reflectors from Langs you will have zero problems driving at night. Don't be fooled by all the various types of lighting out there as most of them are marketing ploys to out do the competition.

Part number 6590BQ:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 10:45 am:

I think that the real limiting factor would not be the type of lights, but the type of license and registration. In Idaho, you can register any car as an automobile, but if you register it as a classic or an antique, you are limited on how much and when you can drive it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 11:03 am:

I got my reflectors from one of the vendors. I don't remember which one but it was about 25 years ago. They are chrome and look very good in the daytime. One night a friend came to visit and wanted to go for a ride in the T. We live in the country and have an 1180' gravel driveway to the main road. I got about 500' from home and decided to turn around. We couldn't see where we were going! Silver reflectors work much better.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 12:06 pm:

Mark Osterman - I'm not sure what makes me think this, but I'm pretty sure that the "RULE" of "no driving between dusk and dawn" is in fact, just that,.....a rule, not a state law, and I believe that this rule is actually just an insurance company "rule" or restriction. FWIW,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

Also check your ins policy certain companies only allow you to drive for antique car events not going to the store or work


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 05:43 pm:

Had an outing last month and spent the night but went to a restaurant in the T's (and two moderns), when we got out it was dark but some street lamps on. Turned on the headlamps and except for one brighter then the other they provided 32 CP of light. The other two T's only had one lamp each but got back okay. Always check the lights before evening. I checked and they didn't. Be careful out there always.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 06:08 pm:

Your biggest problem is not the law, it is the fact that a car going 60 mph does not realize you are only going 30 mph, until you have been rear ended.

The other major problem is that the glare on your flat windshield, from an on coming car, will completely blind you.

I'm another New Yorker that never drives at night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 09:00 pm:

During WWI ambulance drivers would primarily drive the model T ambulances during the night without lights. That was the safest way to do there job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Dizer on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 06:04 pm:

When my dad moved to NY from Indiana in 1959, with my grandpas 25 coupe, the state safety inspector insisted that it had to have sealed beam headlights. Dad found some kind of adapter kits, and installed the six volt 7 1/2" sealed beam headlights in it. There had to be relays installed to handle the current draw. They are still in the car today! He later found out the inspector was wrong! The generator will not keep up with the draw, so night driving was limited. Since it was our second car at the time, when my mom needed the modern car, dad took the T to work. It still has parking permits from the fifties for Cummins diesel, in Columbus IN. and the college dad taught at in NY!


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