Full Size Battery Cover

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Full Size Battery Cover
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 09:49 pm:

I've have a '26 coupe with a battery cover that is the full width of the car. I didn't realize that they weren't all like that. When did Ford 1/2 the size of the cover? I'm undesided about buying that panel to make it a small opening. Any thoughts? Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 - 10:44 pm:

You need to post a picture of this rare item. I'm pretty sure what you have, and what Ford actually made are two different things.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 10:34 am:

Richard, the description that you gave, covers "the full width of the car", is misleading. 26 and 27 coupes had some differences in the trunk floor pans, but those differences were mainly in the rearmost, larger part of the floor pan. If I remember correctly, on my 27 which I currently have,(and a 26) that previously had They had two or three panels that made up the front of the trunk floor. One was on the driver's side behind the seat and in front of the battery opening. The battery opening was covered by a wooden cover. It was not metal. I think there was another metal panel behind the seat on the passenger side of the car, opposite the battery. I don't have my car nearby to photograph, but I can take a picture later today and post it. I do not think that you are talking about a battery box cover which is metal, but is under the wooden cover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 11:48 am:

Afternoon all,

What type of wood would this be? Dimensions? Pictures?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 04:56 pm:

Richard, there are three options for the 26-27 coupe.
1) full length wood board (I believe this is the original early 1926 model)
2) the 40% (estimated) wood board and a long metal cover for the passenger side.
3) a later model long wood board, say 60% and a shorter metal cover.
I may post some exact measurements later.
Vern


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

The full length was used thru mid 1926. I recommend staying with what was original to your car, and not ad the sheet metal 1/2 cover. I did a lot of research at the Benson Ford Research Center and was surprised just how many changes they made to that battery floor board. Floor board is made up of several smaller panels made up with tongue and groove random width boards. The small panels are ship lapped to allow expansion and contraction without changing the overall length of the floorboard. Ship lapped panels are fastened to two stringers by clincher nails to keep them together and maintain flatness. Corners are rounded with a bevel on the underside. finger hole on one side and floorboard is painted black. Fun weekend project. I have the factory drawings if you need specifics let me know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

I'm talking about the wooden panel in the trunk floor, it's 38X13.5. If I remember rightly after 50 years, it was made out of some kinda hardwood that was in sad shape. I replaced it with a panel cut out of plywood. I don't have any photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 03:09 am:

Looks like I don't have to retake the measurements:
August 1925 to March 1926 - 17-1/2 inches long. Part number 57319A
March 1926 to June 1926 - 37-3/4 inches long. Part number 57319B
June 1926 - August 1927 - 22-13/16 inches long. Part number 57319C
This info was taken right off Langs.
The two corresponding metal pieces are obviously different lengths.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 08:01 am:

My car was made May of 1926


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 09:55 am:

Please take a couple of pictures and post since this is searchable, for future reference. Possibly what you have AND what Ford made ARE the same thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 03:54 pm:

Richard, I second Gary's motion, requesting photo of your battery area floor.
Some of these pics were shared with me, others were shamelessly taken.

First the August 1925 to March 1926 - 17-1/2 inches short wood board, long metal cover:
early wood

March 1926 to June 1926 - 37-3/4 inches long total wood:
total wood

June 1926 - August 1927 - 22-13/16 inches long wood board, short metal:
coupe floor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 04:22 pm:

Thanks for the photos, mine is the center photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 07:05 pm:

Jeff,

Are these factory drawings available? In other words, is there a web site which these drawings are viewable?

I am interested in looking at these prints, if available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 08:07 pm:

I contacted Langs and the small steel panel to match the late 26-27 long wood board is not available. If anyone has the measurement/drawing of the short metal panel I would be interested.
Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 08:44 pm:

Sorry,
"clincher nails" -- What do they look like?
Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 09:41 pm:

John,
Factory drawings are available but it is not as easy as you might think, it is like detective work. The Benson Ford Research Center has the Ford Factory drawings from Model T thu 1950s (or more). The drawings are on microfich. To see a "drawing" you need the factory number, not the part number, these numbers are in the Ford parts book that is in reprint. If I remember right the body parts book is the factory number, the chassis parts book has both the part number and factory number. You fill out a form with the factory numbers you want to see and they go into the back and wheel out a cart with boxes about 2' x 2' with about 500 factory drawings per box in numerical order that should include the numbers you requested. There may be 20-50 of those boxes for model t, I do not really know, but sometimes I have requested about 10 factory drawings and it took 3 boxes or more of drawings to cover them.
So you get the box and it contains a little envelope for each microfich drawing revision, and there may be 30 revisions for a single drawing, so you then review each drawing to determine which rev is the version you are looking for. Some are obvious because of date, some revs may be just a couple of weeks apart and some it is not clear why there was a change at all at first glance. OK, so you then find the specific drawing revision you are looking for and you take the microfich to the microfich reader and print out the drawing in segments one 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper one at a time until you can piece together the full size drawing.
Now take the full width version of the battery floor board as an example, for a part made only about 6 months, it had about 25 versions, some minor changes, some major changes. The floor board is an inseperable assembly, that means it is a part assembled from smaller parts that once assembled at the factory is considered a single part. The floor board is an assembly made up of about 6 or 7 piece parts. Each piece part has its own part n umber and it has its own revisions. So do the math, the full width battery floor board drawing is first an assembly drawing of how the piece parts go together, that may have 20 revs. Each piece part of which there may be 7 of, may have 3-5 revs each, you may be looking at floor board drawings all day to find the right combination of drawings for your assembly drawing for your specific search. At last you gather the stack of individual 8.5 x 11 sheets of paper you printed, and pay the nominal fee for each drawing (not each sheet of paper). Then go home and start taping the pages together to make the full size drawing, and oops, I printed out 2 of the same segment and missed another segment, or more likely, you tape the pages together and find there is a 1 inch gap here and there in the final patchwork quilt drawing but you have enough to read the drawing and can make the part. And as you might guess, not all the drawings are there, or are legible, or print readable. That process may sound like torture to some but pure joy to me.

Yes you can contact the BFRC direct and they can send you a print provided it is a simple part and not an assembly like the floor board, and you know the aprox date of the specific revision, and you are willing to pay the higher fee, around $25 instead of $5 or so per drawing. One advantage to having it mailed to you is they print the drawing on a single 11x17 sheet of paper, yea, no patchwork quilt, but not full size either.

Drawings are great, they provide dimensions, list the material, if wood, what species of wood, what vehicle(s) it fits, how many per vehicle, sometimes paint information and color, and lots of other detail, signatures, rips, coffee cup stains, hand written notes, etc.

To answer your question, electronic drawings available?...no... better than electronic drawings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 10:05 pm:

Clincher nails are regular box nails that are longer than the pieces being fastened together, the extra length gets bent over on the back side( or clinched over) to keep the nail tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Thursday, November 09, 2017 - 11:41 pm:

Jeff,

Thank you, for your time explaining this process. I am left thinking, how did they end up building so many of these cars with all the associated versions of 1 part?

I am trying to figure out what is factory equipment with my car. When a topic arises here and if it pertains to my car I get naturally inquisitive.

My trunk has a group of boards 60% of the opening tied together with 2 supports on bottom extending past the end towards the battery box. Do not know how they are put together. If they are "clinched" could be factory. The piece over the battery box looks home made out of a thin piece of wood. Who knows if that is factory, but I doubt it.

This is why I wanted to look at drawings is to get a better understanding of my car and it history.

Again, thank you.
John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 02:32 am:

"Box nails" Hmm, wonder how many folks don't have a clue what those are?? I keep finding terms I grew up with that are lost today (granted, I grew up in a rural mountain area, and we were behind the times a bit. . .
I remember once being asked by some "summer kids" what there was to do around here, and I told them there was a new movie coming in called "Ben Hur" and it's a Talkie!!" They actually believed me. . . (this would have been around 1962)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 08:43 am:

Reason for full length battery floor board is revealed! It is used as coupe battery floor board and tudor rear floor board. Drawing T-50603 "Floor Board #5 End Right Hand" the Model applicability block has Coupe Body, and Tudor Body listed for 1926. The coupe battery cover was also the tudor rear floor board. Now here are some basic useful things from the drawing:
1 material is ash, hard maple, soft maple, birch, magnolia, sycamore, sound oak or beech.
2 Paint black as per paint specification.
3 thickness is 11/8 to 3/4 and width is 15 3/8.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 09:20 am:

Oops, thickness is 13/16 to 3/4


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 12:51 pm:

Here's an example of a long board...that someone took in two photos.
long wood board


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 12:55 pm:

Note the clasp at the top (rear of coupe), finger wire loop, and the bracket hold down across on the other side, without any finger hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, November 10, 2017 - 01:18 pm:

Another example of the early short wood board, long metal (reverse angle).
short board

Another example of the late long wood board, short metal cover.
long board


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