?advice on replacing glass in early sedan??

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: ?advice on replacing glass in early sedan??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F Stephens-Marcle , N.C. Triangle on Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 05:47 pm:

My '19 centerdoor sedan has all original glass, which I want to replace with new safety glass, the glass I am sure I will find (suggestions for sources?) my more pressing question is about the proper replacement material that wraps around the metal frame, and is held in place by the glass. The original appears to be felt against the metal frame, which is then wrapped in one piece of cloth, the cloth is held in place by the glass itself. My research has left me w/o answers for the early cars, where the windows are moved with a strap, no pins. I have a glass channel strip, felt lined, from one of our vendors, but I don't think it will work. Going to my club on the 19th for a tech session, my windows will be part of the work group, would like to have the correct materials before then. Thank you fellow members in advance, you have helped me many times in the past.. could not do it w/o you, respectfully, John S-M


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 11:08 pm:

Ah, yes. Time to get creative. When I restored the early center-door I used to have (about 25 years ago), there was no internet.
The car had been the victim of a bad "50s restoration, that looked nice from twenty feet, but did more harm than good with its correctness. All the side windows had been replaced with Plexiglas. Totally wrong, and most of what belonged was long-gone. I looked at several other sedans, both restored, and unrestored to see what was done originally. Nobody I could find had any of the pieces I needed. So, I made my own channel pieces for the bottoms of the windows, complete with the lip/hook to hang onto the lower window frame (which was still there on all six). Had to figure a way to attach the straps, and made all of it myself.
Anyone that has not looked closely at an early center-door, likely will not understand all of this. However, the windows do not fit into a channel like anything in a car since. They slide up and down inside a wooden frame. Each piece of glass, on the front and back edge, has its own soft padding that stays with the glass, and THAT is what slides up and down the wooden frame. The wooden frame is slightly tapered, narrow at the top, wider the lower it goes to allow the bottom of the window to slip in and out slightly. This is so that the "lip/hook" on the bottom of the window can hook over a metal piece attached inside the wooden body/door framework to hold the window in its full up position. This is actually quite easy to work with holding onto the strap once you get the hang of it. The strap then should have some eyelets to hook onto a screw/stud for partial lowering, and rubber cushions at the bottom of the body/door framework to sit quietly on for full lowering.
I don't know about now. But when I did mine, there was nothing available that approximated the padding on the sides of the glass. I experimented with several things. Slit plastic tubing, rubber hoses, different adhesives. One of the more promising ideas was a type of foam rubber used for wind-lacing, slit lengthwise (not all the way through) and wrapped with some type of felt or cloth tucked into the slit and glued onto the glass. I am not exactly sure what I settled on. But it was a pain to do, and I was never quite happy with the outcome. But it worked fine, and really did look okay.

Good luck! I hope you can find something close to right and easy to do. If not? Maybe what I tried might help?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F Stephens-Marcle , N.C. Triangle on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 01:11 pm:

Thanks Wayne, having the internet has made a world of difference in finding and sharing information, especially if you live an hour or more from a real city with a large library, like myself.(even then, finding what you need is a crap shoot at best) Thank you for sharing your experiences with me, your description of how these windows function is excellent! I had not noticed the tapering frames,(not readily noticeable if you are unaware) took a measuring tape to mine, what a revelation ! Makes sense when you look at it. I am not trying for a 100 point car, I do not have the skills, or the $$$$, that said, PRESERVATION whenever possible is my #1 goal, or at least an as correct as possible rebuild when need be. My goal is to have a safe reliable driver that I and my family can enjoy, but also to share this delightful piece of working history with as many people as possible, now and for future caretakers..so for me it is important to present "Elmer" as correct as possible, (I plan to point out those things that are incorrect also, honest history is important to me) I am very impressed the lengths you went to, to kept your car alive. I am proud to be a member of MTFCA, and all it stands for. SO-O-O-O I know these early closed cars are uncommon (some would say unpopular) but I know there are many other caretakers out there, would appreciate and help you can share. Thank you all, respectfully, John S-M


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