Lets see your mechanical horns

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Lets see your mechanical horns
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

Here is my restored Sparton mechanical horn installed on my 1913 Runabout. It is a pretty rare one, instead of a push-down plunger, it has a lever that pushes forward and pulls back. It is very loud. I have a 1913 penny inlaid in the round knob for good luck ;)



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 06:59 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 07:49 pm:

sheesh, that is nice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 07:51 pm:

Gorgeous horn Ed! That is pretty shiny honker :-)


My old rusty A-K-ORN brand horn works and fits well with Nellie.



A little added spring assist to the mechanism too :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 08:12 pm:

Here is the original magazine ad from 1916.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnold on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

/image{horn}


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnold on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 08:19 pm:

horn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 08:27 pm:

That’s an interesting one


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 10:33 pm:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 11:24 pm:

Not mechanical but a "Combination Klaxon" horn that I recently picked up within walking distance of my home.

It's massive - Coke can included for comparison.

klaxon


2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 11:40 pm:

Talk about a rich man's toy! $50 in 1913 would be $1,259.28 today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnold on Monday, November 13, 2017 - 08:51 am:

That would mean that a $500 car in 1913 would be equal to a $12,000 car today. Model T's would have been to expensive for the common folks.


Year Production Price for
Runabout Notes
1909 10,666 $825 [50] $22,000 in 2016. Touring car was $850.
1910 19,050 $900 $137,000 in 2015-prices[49]
1911 34,858 $680
1912 68,773 $590
1913 170,211 $525
1914 202,667 $440 Fiscal year was only 10 months long due to change in end date from September 30 to July 31
1915 308,162 $390
1916 501,462 $345 [51]
1917 735,020 $500 $33,000 in 2015-prices[49]
1918 664,076 $500
1919 498,342 $500
1920 941,042 $395 Production for fiscal year 1920, (August 1, 1919 through July 31, 1920). Price was $550 in March but dropped by September
1920 463,451 $395 Production for balance of calendar year, August 1 through December 31. Total '1920' production (17 months) = 1,404,493
1921 971,610 $325 Price was $370 in June but dropped by September
1922 1,301,067 $319
1923 2,011,125 $364
1924 1,922,048 $265
1925 1,911,705 $260 or $300 ($14,000 in 2016).[52] ($3,550 in 2016)[dubious – discuss] Touring car was $290
1926 1,554,465 $360
1927 399,725 $360 Production ended before mid-year to allow retooling for the Model A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, Spakenburg NL on Monday, November 13, 2017 - 10:20 am:

Here's my honker :




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 01:43 pm:

This is the horn on my '10. Mounts on the steering column. Never saw another one like it. Plenty loud
!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 02:30 pm:

Arnold, A new $12,000 car today is pretty much bottom-of-the line, isn't it? (I'm not in the market for a new car, so I don't really know)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 04:33 pm:

A bit far away, but my 1915 pat. hand Klasonette is on the ?War Wagon. Extremely loud. It's a little hard to push and I leave it that way so it doesn't turn into the McDonalds Playhouse at shows and events.

It works when it neds to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 05:00 pm:

The Mighty Ahoogah



The visual impact of a Brass-Era automobile is so striking, it can overshadow the other senses, which is kind of a shame because the way these cars sound is also wonderfully unique, and everyone who works with them just loves the low-revving kisskisskisskiss sound of a flat-head engine. -Oh, but the horns! -I was surprised to learn that Klaxon horns had been marketed fairly early in the game—1908—which coincided with the earliest production of Henry Ford's Model T. -I had thought that those early days were the sole domain of the squeeze-bulb horn. -Not so.

Miller Reese Hutchinson invented the Ahoogah-horn and it was first marketed by the Lovell-McConnell Manufacturing Co., the founder of which named the device, "Klaxon," a slight bastardization of "klazo," which, translated from Ancient Greek, means, "I shriek." -The first units were electric and later models, like the "Klaxonette," were hand-powered, but either type gets its characteristic ahoogah sound from a spinning cog that beats its rounded-off teeth against a rivet in the center of a metal diaphragm.



It was good to learn that these horns are period-correct for fairly early horseless-carriages because... well, I've always felt a little like it was cheating to have a hand-Klaxon instead of a squeeze-bulbed Mr. Magoo horn on my '15 Ford. -My defense for the compromise with historical accuracy had been a pretty weak excuse—simply that car-show spectators loved the sound of darned thing and expected antique cars to have them. -It also happens that the distinctive sound of these little beauties is so loudly raucous and attention-getting that from a safety standpoint, they're a good thing to have in busy traffic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 05:08 pm:

Steve Jelf, did you ever find a replacement handle for your mechanical horn?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Friday, November 17, 2017 - 10:34 pm:

Here is the Garford horn that is on my 1916 Touring car. It is easy to use because of the angle of the plunger. Sure is loud.

Bill

HornLabel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joerg Walther - FarFarAway (Germany) on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 08:36 am:

That's mine - unfortunately without branding.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace, Woodstock,Ont. Canada on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

This horn was on my grandfather's 1913 T. Here it is on his car in 1957, and now it's on my '15 T. It's called a Handphone. It has a great deep tone to it.Horn bell is nickel plated.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace, Woodstock,Ont. Canada on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 05:49 pm:

Just as a side note, my steering wheel in the above photo came off of this T. It was my great grandfather's. Photo from 1925. My grandma is sitting on the hood. This steering wheel was used for many years as a bird cage stand base for their canary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 07:17 pm:

Here is mine, painted some kind of military Gray.


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