Jay’s Great Photographs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Jay’s Great Photographs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 07:58 am:

For months I was missing seeing your wonderful photographs Jay. And now you’re back. So, what happened? Were you on a round the world trip? Do you also collect photographic negatives?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 08:05 am:

Jay, I was wondering the same thing as I enjoy seeing a glimpse into the past. I fessed up that my cartoons came from old silent movies but your photos are much higher quality. Source?
And a thanks to everyone who posts!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 08:55 am:

If I told you where the old photos came from I'd have to kill you! :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)

I decided to take some time off the computer this summer and devoted our time to gardening and canning. Matter of fact in the last month we gleaned
about 150 pounds of English Walnuts. We also just now put up 14 gallons of green and black Olives we gleaned from around the local area and we will probably stop at 30 or so gallons.These are water cured olives and won't be ready to eat until next April or May.

BTW: It's nice to hear that the time I put into posting Old Photos is appreciated!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:15 am:

Much appreciated, Jay, rest assured.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:32 am:

Jay: I thoroughly enjoy the old photos you and others post here. Occasionally I see a reference to a place I've visited or resided. I always learn something positive and interesting from these posts and I hope you continue to share these old pics with us. Thanks, jb

None of my business, but just how many olives do you need to eat each day to consume the 30 gallons before the next crop comes in?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:41 am:

Jay your postings are one of the best parts of the forum. They most assuredly are appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:49 am:

Last year our english walnut crop off two trees was huge but this year the squirels will starve. I really enjoy the pictures!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 10:00 am:

Thanks All! They say a photo is worth a thousand words and I personally love seeing these freeze frames of life and times gone by. It makes these people and places come alive again each time the photo is viewed.

James, We gift the majority of the Olives out to family, friends, and neighbors. It's a labor of love since you need to change the water in the olives every day until their no longer bitter then you brine them in a brine of salt water and wine vinegar with a Bayleaf and a clove of garlic in each 2 quart jar. I store them on the cool winter garage floor until they are ready. After that they are stored in the refrigerator. Water cured olives can't be purchased in the store. You have to make them yourself or know some old fart who will share some with you. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 12:56 pm:

I want to thank you also for all the photos you take the time to post...Carl...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 01:06 pm:

Jay, I also want to thank you for posting all those really nice historical pictures. It's an accurate glimpse into the past that we all can really enjoy!
Thanks again,
Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Horton, Utah on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 01:16 pm:

Add my thanks to the list. At 82, I could be in some of them, so I look them over pretty close!! A window to the past indeed!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Brintnall on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 01:27 pm:

Jay, looking for and at yours and others pictures are a part of my day. Thanks. Allen Brintnall SWMo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 01:33 pm:

The old photos do take many of us to a special time and place. A peek into the past can be pretty magical. Jay does have an extraordinary knack for finding these.
We are lucky for these things here on the Forum.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 01:50 pm:

Jay, I'm glad you enjoyed a "summer vacation" and had a bounteous harvest. I love olives, I can imagine how fine the ones you put up are !! You can't beat home preserves. Like the others, I greatly enjoy the pictures you post, thank you !!! I missed them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

I too enjoy your postings of all the photos so THANK YOU for taking the time to do it. Of course with all these compliments you're going to need a hat stretcher! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 03:23 pm:

-Jay-
Your efforts are much appreciated! Rather than for someone to lose their life, :-) you might consider sharing your 'secret source' (like McDonald's or Coca-Cola's recipe secrets.) A sealed envelope could be your answer?
Take Care; Behave; "Don't Shoot!" (and)
"Happy T-ing!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 04:12 pm:

Jay, your picture posts are really enjoyable and I agree that they bring the people and places back to life when we see them once again. My dad's genealogy work has taught me to thoroughly mark all pictures with name, place and date for the generations to come. We always find so many pictures which have no identification whatsoever which gives us all the chance to play Sherlock Holmes, but that's also part of the fun, isn't it?

The following link shows a motion picture of everyday life in Barcelona, Spain in 1908. They were captured by a camera mounted to the front of a streetcar. None of the people who appear in this film are alive today but their spirit lives on as we watch them waving at the camera, driving a cart pulled by horse, zigzagging across the tracks or crossing just in time to dodge the streetcar. You will notice the lack of motor cars but an abundance of bicycles. The generally fair weather in Barcelona makes them a viable means of transportation but the uphill ride made by the streetcar would require some extra effort on the part of the person riding a bike. Enjoy these 7 minutes captured the same year the Model T was introduced to the world.

https://youtu.be/VdsHKOlTeMk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 04:24 pm:

By the way, we just collected the olives for the first time from the five trees at our "new" place. My wife found some recipes and put them up today. We'll see how they come out in a few weeks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:34 pm:

Add me to the list of big thank you's!
Fascinating looks into life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:45 pm:

Eric, I use this guide on the many different ways to cure olives. It's put out by the University of California in PDF format. I use the water cure method then brine them.

Here's the link:
http://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/pdf/8267.pdf


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:56 pm:

Jay, Not just the photos, you writing about putting up the olives takes me back to happier days. When I was little, my grandmother used to put up olives from the two (one small, the other huge and spreading wide) olive trees behind the garage. They sold that ranch when I was twelve, as my grandfather cut back towards retirement (he was almost 70 then). Putting up the olives was my grandmother's thing. Something she did because she enjoyed doing it, and she liked the olives (so did we!). We, as kids, were never really involved in the olives, and I don't know what her recipe was, although it sounds a lot like yours. When I was little, there were always the line of crocks (pots) against the back wall of the garage that sat next to the house. There, they could sit in the shade for the weeks it took before they were ready for canning.
My grandfather was a wonderful man, very forward thinking, and very hard working. Most of his life, he subscribed to and read the "Scientific American" magazine. He had many issues he had kept because of articles that especially interested him. I was reading them when I was young. The advertising in them was one of the things that got me interested in history at such an early age. Sadly, someone in the family threw them all out, probably shortly after he passed. He was always up to date on the newest farming techniques (except for tractors? Until he was nearly killed by a horse kicking him in the face in 1935). He liked working with horses.
One of the family legends, is that he and my grandmother bought one of the first ranches they owned with the money he made moving about a hundred grown established olive trees from one farm to another a few miles away. Because he had read so much about developments in farming techniques, he knew how to do it, and nobody else for many miles around had any idea how. This was about 1922.

Thank you Jay! For the photos, and the memory triggers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 06:32 pm:

Keep it up Jay. Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 06:33 pm:

Jay your pictures are defiantly something I look forward to every time I go to the forum! Welcome back, and thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 07:20 pm:

As always I'm a day late and a dollar short, but yes Jay, I too am glad you're back posting pics and any other valuable information you have to offer! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 07:44 pm:

Yes Jay ... I love looking at your photographs and it takes a lot to keep me interested photographically ... I see a lot every day. Remember that I work in the most comprehensive photography museum in the world. George Eastman Museum has more than 4 million photographs, about eight thousand cameras (and thousands of other objects) the largest collection of silent era nitrate based movies and a massive photo literature collection.

Of the many processes I teach are the glass and film negatives ... and the printing processes used during the model T era. Do you have negatives of model T subjects?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 08:23 pm:

Thanks for the olive pickling tips Jay. Very interesting information. I'll put it to use!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

Jay, I do look forward to your old photo posts. You can read a thousand words, or more sometimes with comments from the gallery.
r/s Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Curtis on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

Jay Your pictures alone would pay for me being a part this group, not to mention all of the other amenities.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 07:47 pm:

Jay,

Thank you so much for your support to our hobby and the forum. The photos are awesome!

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 11:52 pm:

Jay,
All of us Aussies appreciate your efforts to find and post
the great photos (my computer is chock a block full of them!)
Alan in Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:32 am:

Jay, I love the old photos too. They are reminiscent of times past. To this Aussie, they are so different in their settings to those we find here.

Your reference to canning did amuse me though. We stayed with friends in Spokane one summer and the lady of the house was into canning. But there wasn't a can in sight! She was using glass jars, as you do with your olives.
We in Australia PICKLE olives and onions etc, always in jars. Stone fruits like peaches and apricots are BOTTLED, in jars like your Mason jars. Usually this is called preserving rather than canning. I presume canning is a carryover when canning was first used commercially to preserve fruits, conserves etc.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:45 pm:

Allan B, I love the study of language! Yeah, calling it "canning" when it is all in jars always bothered me, even when I was about five. But that is what our family seemed to always call it. My grandparents "raised" peaches on a couple small ranches that totaled a little over a hundred acres. They usually sold to the local canning industry (real cans!). But every year, my mother, grandmother, and a few aunts, would "can" peaches for all our uses. Hundreds of mason jars full of peaches. They would work on it for days. I still love good peaches. But I am really tough to please on their quality.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Myers on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 11:05 am:

Jay,
You know what they say..... a picture is worth a 1,000 words. Although, I think a Model T picture is worth at least 2,000 words.
I always look forward to seeing them.Please keep them coming!


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