Spoke installation

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Spoke installation
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Heiser on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 04:58 pm:

OK, I have built the spoke press as per the Fun Projects instructions. Everything is square and true. I ordered one set of spokes to give it a try. The felloe is is good, cleaned and painted.

I have read the posts and watched the instructional videos. The problem I am having is placing the new spokes on the hub, resting on the cardboard circle and paper tube. The spokes will not just set into place on the hub, resting on the cardboard without becoming too tight on the hub as I place them.

I have the Ford wheel/felloe with 1/2" tenon, It actually measures to be .548 inches. I know the tenon is oversized and to be pressed in. I just don't have enough clearance to put the spokes in place. the first 3, maybe 4 spokes go in ok but lose hub clearance becoming too tight to add anymore.

What am I missing here? Help is surely appreciated!spoke/hub placement


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:02 pm:

Without having done this before and observing your photo it looks like the spoke is in upside down. The notch should point up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:07 pm:

In the first place, you better NOT be trying to press the spokes in THAT way! The tapered (chamfer) cut on the inside end of the spoke MUST face the hub flange so that the radius of the hub can be bridged by that taper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:09 pm:

I just rebuilt my rear wheels a few months ago. I made the mistake of thinking the knotch is to make it easier to press in. The knotch is to leave room near the hub for the machining curve. I also learned the hard way to sand the sides of the spokes where they touch so they are smooth so they will slip and line up when you do the final squeeze with the hub bolts.

I too used the cardboard like you have and it worked well. If a mistake could be made pressing in spokes I think I made them all but in the end they turned out well and look good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:21 pm:

John and Wayne got it. If you're going by my video you missed the note about the paper tube. You don't need it. The cardboard ring will suffice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

This is the rear of my 26 and may be upside down from what you are doing. All the notches are face down towards the inside of the hub and all the spokes are loose, no fit problem at all. This is no cardboard center or ring here but the hub is high enough, far away from the rim. If the vertical starting distance is too shallow, then you will have a problem laying in the spokes.
spokes on hub before press


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

As folks said, the spoke is upside down. The chamfer is there to provide space for the fillet at the base of the hub.

Once you turn all of the spokes over and start pressing again, keep an eye on the base of each spoke and straighten out any that try to twist relative to their neighbors. Also watch the end of each spoke to make sure that it makes the turn into its corresponding hole in the felloe.

Good luck! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 07:39 pm:

I just finished pressing 4 wheels. What I learned is to use the cardboard disk to get the spokes roughly aligned, press a little so that the pin gets started into the fellow hole. Then back off and align the spokes. Pay attention to whether strait or clocked and also make sure the ends are even up and down under the flange. You may need to do this a couple times. If the flat ends are off the lower one wants to break off the corner of the one adjacent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 07:46 pm:

I use paraffin wax on the spokes, it helps eliminate splitting when pressed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 08:46 pm:

Don

which surface(s) do you apply the wax?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 08:55 pm:

I think most everybody does it a bit different but what is missed from the way I did it is that you really don't need any cardboard once you find the correct height for the hub. The hub is NOT supposed to be able to turn easily. One of the main things that makes it manageable by a single person is you get the hub in mid air at a correct height based upon your spokes and the hub and tighten it up between a nut on the underside and a nut on the top side so it cannot spin since if it spins the teepee of spokes falls down. The rubber pad around the rim allows the felloe to move as it wants to so that it centers on the hub and doesn't fight you but also provides a bit of tension too to help you hold the spoke teepee together. You lower the hub a little at a
time on the first wheel you do but you then measure the height above the floor of the press and set the next wheel hub at that exact height to start with and on future wheels on that press. The correct height then holds the spokes in a tension between the hub surface underneath and the tenon hole in the fellow. You need the height so you can work under the hub to place that nut a bit lower as you take up the slack on top with the top nut. There are many ways to press a wheel together but the idea is to do it under control so you can keep everything aligned as you go. The notch on the side of the press is so you can poke the last spoke up in place from underneath. If you just press the wheel down against something flat then there are lots of things that can go wrong if it can't center itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 09:00 pm:

I think most everybody does it a bit different but what is missed from the way I did it is that you really don't need any cardboard once you find the correct height for the hub. The hub is NOT supposed to be able to turn easily. One of the main things that makes it manageable by a single person is you get the hub in mid air at a correct height based upon your spokes and the hub and tighten it up between a nut on the underside and a nut on the top side so it cannot spin since if it spins the teepee of spokes falls down. The rubber pad around the rim allows the felloe to move as it wants to so that it centers on the hub and doesn't fight you but also provides a bit of tension too to help you hold the spoke teepee together. You lower the hub a little at a
time on the first wheel you do but you then measure the height above the floor of the press and set the next wheel hub at that exact height to start with and on future wheels on that press. The correct height then holds the spokes in a tension between the hub surface underneath and the tenon hole in the fellow. You need the height so you can work under the hub to place that nut a bit lower as you take up the slack on top with the top nut. There are many ways to press a wheel together but the idea is to do it under control so you can keep everything aligned as you go. The notch on the side of the press is so you can poke the last spoke up in place from underneath. If you just press the wheel down against something flat then there are lots of things that can go wrong if it can't center itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 03:22 am:

I'm curious why the Canadian spokes aren't reproduced. With their tapered edges it's a lot easier to assemble a wheel and no press is needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 04:34 am:

John F. Regan is right about not pressing the wheel down against something flat. In the above example the rim will lift up in the air, allowing the spokes to center, when the spokes become co-planer with the table surface.

JohnH, that's interesting. The spokes pictured were once longer spokes and I cut them shorter, recreating the tenon, with a taper on the end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 08:43 am:

Sorry for the double post. Not sure why or how I do that sometimes. Just old age I guess.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wilson, Saint John NB, Canada on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:26 am:

David. Be sure you don't have a Canadian T. These cars had different wheels, made by Kelsey Canada that used a shorter spoke with a different profile. I stripped 2 all-thread rods trying to press repro spokes into my Canadian wheels before I discovered the difference.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration