Auto Parts Terminology

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Auto Parts Terminology
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

It's interesting that many auto parts are referred to by more than one name,....some have several names. While it's true that some part names are used incorrectly, I believe that some parts actually have more than one correct name, and so perhaps, the reason for that is more or less,...."geographic", (for lack of a better term). And by the way, I'm not talking about the difference between English, Australian, European, and American designations,....that's a whole n'other issue! I think it might make sense, and maybe even be helpful in clearing up some misunderstandings about "terminology". Actually, if us Model T guys were to do it collectively as a group, it might even be fun. Not sure if anyone would be interested in participating in this, but if not,.....no harm done, right? Again, not to call anybody "right" or "wrong", but just to maybe clear up a common source of confusion. I'll start it off:

1. - tappet - valve lifter - cam follower - pushrod
2. - wrist pin - piston pin
3. - wheel - rim
4. - cotter pin - cotter key
5. - camshaft gear - timing gear
6. - torque tube - driveshaft housing
7. - grease fitting - zerk
8. - inner bearing race - cone - cup
9. - spindle bolt - kingpin
10.-ammeter - amp gage - amp meter
11.-motometer - motor meter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 07:09 pm:

Number 2 is also known as “gudgeon pin” in England


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 07:18 pm:

Well,.....that's why I said that I wasn't really talking about the different names for parts in foreign countries. I mean, I know our hood is your bonnet, and our truck is your boot, etc, etc. I'm talking about the fact that here in the U.S.A., we can't decide if we should say tappet, valve lifter, cam follower, or as Ford called them back in the "T" era,...."pushrod"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 07:46 pm:

Colloquialisms. Always colloquialisms. Most of these do suffer from regional influences. Some, there are technical distinctions that tend to be forgotten. The camshaft gear? Is a timing gear. But not all timing gears are camshaft gears. The model T also uses a crankshaft gear. Either one or both can be correctly called timing gear(s). And some other cars also use idler gears or timing chains. Tappets may be considered pushrods? Also valve lifter certainly works correctly. However, not all pushrods or valve lifters can be correctly called "tappets. A tappet is a specific type of valve lifter. Similar distinctions apply to few others (Zerk is one specific type of grease fitting).

As for "motometer"? Boyce themselves spelled it at least three different ways in their original advertising and labeling. They also varied on whether or which "M"s were capitalized or not. I guess they couldn't even figure it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:06 pm:

Tappet in my book usually refers to the rocker arm as it's the only thing that will tap in that type of valve system if it's out of adjustment. Valve lifter and cam follower are the same thing. The part that directly rides the camshaft lobe. The pushrod is used in the rocker arm type system. It rides atop the cam follower and activates the rocker arm. They are 3 different parts. 2 thru 11 are fairly OK & correct/acceptable descriptions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:22 pm:

A T related one,
crank case - oil pan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:44 pm:

Some of the items listed are synonyms, and some aren't. Examples: a race and a cup are the same thing, but a cone is a different part; a rim is not a wheel, but part of a wheel; a zerk is a grease fitting, but not all grease fittings are zerks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 10:49 pm:

finger jab


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 11:02 pm:

All these common terms used loosely and interchangeably are OK for the shade-tree mechanics, but for real accuracy, we should be using the precise, time-honored technical terms designated by professional engineers and machinists, such as "gizmo", "doo-hickey", "thinga-ma-jig", "whatzit" and "dingus", which leave no room for confusion when used in phrases describing an item's function in relation to other parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 11:09 pm:

Harold, does this one work?
I've known a spherical rod end to be a spherical rod end for 30+ years and now with the help of racing folks and model T folks, I now find it's been a heim joint forever.
Three different industries in the same country: airlines, auto racers and model T modders/racers. Two different terms.

A spherical rod end.
rod end

A heim joint.
heim

Obviously, I won't mention splash aprons verses splash shields.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 11:30 pm:

How about Split Pins instead of cotter pin?
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 11:33 pm:

I often check the parts book and use the Ford name for a part. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:22 am:

Duey - Yup! Just what I'm talk'n about!

Steve - Yeah, yeah,.....there ya' go! Make'n sense again! But ya' can't tell me that there isn't quite often, some sort of "heated discussion" with a bunch of "T" guys when yer' just not quite sure what to call one of those out of place, funny look'n little banjo shaped morphodite things that connect some guys fuel line (or is it a gas line) to his carburetor, right? And you wouldn't find that one in your Ford parts book, even if ya' DID have a "parts book" in the hip pocket of your "bibs"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:27 am:

Alan - Yup! You're right! I missed that one in my #4, right? Cotter pin, cotter key, and, "SPLIT PIN"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:31 am:

After selling auto parts for 35+ years, currently at a NAPA store, I've heard all kinds. How about bellhousing = hogs head? On V engines, center head= intake manifold. Often customers don't really want what they ask for. For example a cotter pin and a cotter key are two different things. I've had people, back in distributor ignition days, ask for a rotor cap. A rotor is one thing while a cap is something else, related but different. Sometimes people ask for a hub when they need a brake drum. Several times people ask if GM points were preset.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:42 am:

Just remembered another one that comes up quite often here on the forum,..... flaps and rim liners. Two entirely different things, but like Tommy C. says,..... can't always be too sure what someone's talking about, because they're not too sure either!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:02 am:

Harold, the most common denomination for no 7 in Australia is a grease nipple.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:04 am:

Harold, the most common name for a number 7 in Australia is grease nipple.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:46 am:

I'm with Steve on the wheels/rim thing. It really gripes me when a wheel is referred to as a rim. A rim is the outer part of a wheel, whether they are made as one piece or not. JMHO.
Tommy, what is the difference between a cotter pin and a cotter key? Around here the two terms are for the same thing, at least for the last 60 years that I know of. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 03:24 am:

Harmonic balancer - harmonic damper - crankshaft pulley - crankshaft fan belt pulley.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:32 am:

I haven't seen it used around here for many years, but when I was younger, the "old timers" around here often refered to a nut as a tap. When I worked in a machine/welding shop in the mid 70's, we broke a lot of them of that. When they would ask for a "bolt and tap" that's what we gave them. Then we would say, "Oh, you mean a bolt and nut? " Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:36 am:

I've also heard a "cotter key" refered to as a "carter key". Don't know how they come up with that. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:40 am:

How about , rearend, rear axle, third member? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:47 am:

We always refered to the inner panel on a door as a "door panel" :-) I see now they refer to them as a "door card". I think mostly by the ones that call a wheel a rim. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:56 am:

I've even seen a sedan called a hardtop on some of the TV shows. I guess because it wasn't a convertible, or rag top, or soft top, or drop top. Man, I'm on a roll! :-) I think some of our terminology is slowly being lost. :-( We can't let this happen!! We must unite!! OK, I'm getting tired. I'll shut up for now, unless I think of something else. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 06:44 am:

footfeed=gas pedal


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 07:40 am:

Yeah, like everybody's gonna get on the same page......NOT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 08:56 am:

A PARTS MAN'S LAMENT
I work behind the counter in an automotive store.
Sometimes I'm called a genius, sometimes I'm called much more.
I'm just a simple parts man, but when a job goes sick.
The "experts" come to me and ask "What makes this damn thing tick ?"
I'm supposed to know the numbers of nuts and bolts and gears;
on every product ever made for more than fifty years.
Mind reader and magician, and handyman as well.
I'm supposed to be Edison plus Alexander Bell.
But life would be a pleasure and I'd grinn from ear to ear,
if people just would tell me the MAKE, MODEL AND YEAR!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:10 am:

Wishbone or radius rod?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:50 am:

Drive plate vs flywheel
(Automatic vs manual)

manual vs straight transmission


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:56 am:

Straight transmission vs stickshift, early non syncro stickshift was a crashbox, automatic transmission was a slushbox. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:57 am:

In the world of bicycling, another interest of mine, a cotter PIN is a tapered pin, sometimes with one flat side, with threads on the small end. They are used on some bikes, especially European made three speeds, to hold the crank arms on. If all goes well the nut is backed off and the end is tapped with a hammer and the pin loosens. There are special tools to remove stubborn ones that don't loosen when tapped with a hammer. I believe that "cottered pin" was in times past, used to describe tapered pins that were drilled on the small end for a cotter key as we know them. I could be wrong and you will probably find different descriptions depending on where you look.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 10:05 am:

I sold aftermarket parts on the North East for years and then took a job in Tampa, FL and had to relearn the terminology:

Brain box- electronic control module
Rotor cap- distributor cap
Rotor button- distributor rotor
Topper- pickup bed cap
Clutch fan- fan clutch
Cadillac converter- catalytic converter
Berk- Buick
Bowagon- Volkswagon
Boham- Brougham


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Tim, you forgot to mention:
Cooter hull- trunk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 11:21 am:

A recently deceased Ford parts specialist here never used part names, only numbers, even discussing 60s or later stuff. "Do you want the 62e-543102 or is it a 564378B?" I never could keep up.

And don't forget floggle-toggles or humgrummits to add to thingumies and do-wots.

The wife was very impressed when in a Rural Life museum I instantly said 'that's a swingle-tree'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:30 pm:

Make, model and year. A week ago, I went to Autozone to get a battery for the Model A. I walked past the counter and over to the batteries. Young kid walks over and asks if he can help. I was sure I would find what I wanted, if they had it. They are all right there where they can be seen. But he was persistent so I told him I wanted a Group 1 battery. What's it go in? It doesn't matter. A group 1 is a Group 1. What's the make and model? So I give in and tell him a '29 Ford. (So, just as I expected......) Oh, we won't have anything for THAT. So I said how about an 8N Tractor? Huh? 'Bout that time, MY WIFE finds the battery on the shelf. Gotta love that make and model stuff. If I had played that game, I'd still be looking for a battery, cause I seriously doubt the kid behind the counter at Advance or O'Reilly would have been much different. I wish NAPA had been open. Fred would have known what a Group 1 battery was and he's 5-6 miles closer to the house.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

Quarter panel vs fender (rear wing)
capacitor vs condenser
emergency brake vs parking brake

My wife works at AZ and knows what a group 1 is. But if anyone goes there, ask for a 6volt automotive battery.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 01:37 pm:

We'll never agree on part names if we can't settle what the car is called - T Model or Model T. It's another regional thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:19 pm:

Tim: I have also heard ECM Engine Control Module
Hal: When I go into a parts store I always tell them to step away from the computer and over here to the paper manuals and no one will get hurt!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:19 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 03:25 pm:

I'll admit I'm guilty of calling the hogshead the bell housing when I try and explain T things to normal people.

A couple months ago when I was looking locally for frost plugs (or freeze plugs - there's another for the list) I went in to the NAPA just on the edge of town. I figured that was the best one because they're closer to the country and have some obscure tractor stuff right there on the shelf that's got me out of trouble on the T before. Anyways, I go up to the girl at the counter and ask if they have any frost plugs in stock.

"What car?" she asks.

"1926 Ford, but really whatever you have in stock that measures 13/16(?) will do."

"I don't have that in the computer, is it an F150 or an F250?"

"Umm... probably an F-zero at best."


So I left and drove to a different parts store when they told me over the phone they sell frost plugs by size. Walk in, tell them I was the guy who had called five minutes before and that I needed 13/16. Turns out hey only had metric sizes. No biggie, I'll just take three 22mm (or whatever equivalent) only to be told he couldn't sell metric plugs for an imperial car. I tried to explain and I pride myself on communication, patience and reasoning, but there was just no way I was walking out with parts measured in the wrong units. Something about liability.

In case anyone was wondering how this ended, I found I had three nickels in my pocket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 03:40 pm:

David, a "hardtop", sometimes weirdly called a "hardtop convertible" is a sedan with no B pillars. At least it was in the 60's/70's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 03:52 pm:

How about that bent "hair pin" looking gizmo you put through the hole in a shaft, such as the pin that holds your trailer hitch in the receiver?

It's called......wait for it......a Jandorf key.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 03:57 pm:

George, I thought they were called "snap pins" or "lock pins".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:28 pm:

timer vs commutator

Roadster vs runabout

touring vs Phaeton


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 04:48 pm:

Yep Chris, that's the way I learned it in the early '50's. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 05:10 pm:

George and Vern, In Aus. that's an R clip.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 05:17 pm:

Internal verses external engine atmospheric pressure differential detector

or

Vacuum gauge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 05:33 pm:

Dave, a common Korean family name is Pahk. (I'd show it in Korean, but this site's software can't handle that.) The guys who devised the system for Romanizing Korean words were English, and they wrote Pahk as Park, because pahk is how they say park in England. Maybe the carter key spelling comes from England (or Boston). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

>Number 2 is also known as “gudgeon pin” in England<

I've only heard this term in boatyards; in Maine transom mounted rudders swing on a two-part hinge, one part is called a pintle, the other a gudgeon. Also, I've always heard the term split pin used interchangeably with roll pin and spring pin, but never with cotter pin...I worked with a service mechanic a few years ago in Alberta who had the drawers in his tool chest labeled; the one for the hex wrenches for socket head screws was labeled "eilan wrenches", another with the adjustable clamping pliers labelled "vice crips".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daren Carlson on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 07:08 pm:

If you do your homework there is no such thing as a "frost" plug. However there are welch plugs. Core plugs and cups.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 07:28 pm:

choke or strangler


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 07:30 pm:

set screw or grub screw


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 12:16 am:

My ex brother in law always calls tires "casings." That seems outdated and a lot of times the people at the tire store don't know what he's talking about.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 04:44 am:

I have to read all the new postings at least once a day! Ain't linguistics grand?
Fun stuff. Thanks all.

As for the "year, make, model" thing? I used to hate (I really do use that word sparingly) going to the auto supply to get points for the '65 Ford 3/4 ton pickup I drove for work for 17 years. After they went computer? The computer only went back to '68.
Except for a very few high performance (Mallory, Shelby, AC Cobra and the like), ALL Ford V8s from mid '50s until discontinued for electronic ignition used the one same set of points! And yet, EVERY time: "What year?" "Doesn't matter" "I have to have a year" "Put in '70" "Is it a '70?" "No, it is a '65" "Our computer doesn't go back that far" "That is why I said put in '70" "But I have to put in a year" "It doesn't matter, they are all the same for many years, put in '70" "Okay, two wheel drive or four wheel drive?"
Followed by "3/4 or 1/2 ton?" (I had already told them), then "automatic or manual" then "AC or no" "power steering?".
Yeah.
I got to where when I had to buy points? I bought three sets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 10:03 am:

Save the box when you find a part you need, that way when you go back to the store hand them the box and say you need another one. This works really well at NAPA, and good at other parts stores if you wait for the old guy behind the counter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 06:35 pm:

Forgive me if I might have told this story before, but Wayne's post makes me do it.

Several years ago I put together a street rod, which incorporated a flathead Merc motor with a C-4 automatic transmission. The guy who did the transmission warned me that we had no idea of the correct speedometer gear to put in and he could only guess and then when I drove the car I'd be able to calculate the correct tooth count and buy another gear. That's cool. When you're putting a whole car together, this is just one more little problem to solve.

So after driving the car over a measured mile the speedometer read 60 and my stopwatch said I was going 50. So I needed a gear with 20% more teeth. What I needed was a 17 tooth speedometer gear.

To the young man at the Ford parts counter: "I need a speedometer gear for a C-4 transmission, 17 tooth."

Young man, condescendingly: "We have a computer here. You need to tell me the type car and it will tell us exactly what you need."

Me: "I don't think that will work."

YM: "Sure it will. What kind of car is it?"

Me: "1953 Mercury"

YM: "V-8 ?"

"Yup"

"Automatic or manual?"

"Automatic"

"Power Steering?"

"Nope"

"Air?"

"Nope"

"Station wagon or sedan?"

"Sedan"

After watching his computer crunch for a while, YM informed me that there was no such car in his computer.

So I said, "Let's try this: '71 Ford Fairlane, Automatic, 289, manual steering, no air, 4-door sedan."

YM: "Got it."

And with that he walked into the back and came out with a little box. I removed the gear, which looked very much like the one I had in my hand. But when I counted the teeth, it was a 13. Upon putting the gear back in its box, I noticed that the part number was something like xxxxxxx-13.

Me: "Wrong gear."

YM: "Sorry, I guess we can't help you." And with that he started back down one of the aisles to replace the box on its shelf.

Me: "Can I come with you and see if I can spot the right part?"

YM: "Sure, you can come back, but there's millions of parts back there and without the computer you haven't got a chance."

So we walked into the back and YM replaced the box in the empty spot. Of course, there were a couple dozen identical looking boxes, all with the same part number but with different dash numbers. I pulled down an xxxxxx-17 and walked with him back to the counter. Upon removing the gear from the box, a miracle occurred. It was a 17 tooth speedometer gear !

Me: "This is what I need. How much?"

YM rang up the sale and I paid him. As I turned to walk out, YM said:

"You gotta tell me. Out of all those parts back there, how in the world, did you know which one to pick ?"

Me: "Can't explain it. Just dumb luck I guess."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James MacNaughton on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 08:24 pm:

"Zerk" is a brand name for a specific type of grease fitting, no? It became the default fitting for many applications, and the inventor is now forgotten (even by me)? Like "Kleenex" for tissue, or "Spandex" for lycra material, Frisbee and all that rot?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 07:55 am:

If I'm not mistaken, back when, Zerk and Alemite were two separate companies and each had their own proprietary grease fitting which required a grease gun with a corresponding tip. I think somewhere along the line, one company was acquired by the other. I've heard the common current day grease fitting called a "Zerk" and an "Alemite". I'm not sure if either is correct. I've just always called them "Grease Fittings".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 08:42 am:

Oskar Zerkowitz emigrated to the U.S. from Austria, invented the fitting, then Anglicized and shortened his name to Oscar Zerk so shop foremen wouldnt have to tell their grease monkeys to

"Get under that truck and pump those Zerkowitzes!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 09:32 am:

James don't forget Zipper for Slide fastener.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 08:49 am:

I had a old truck driver tell me gas lines are for gas cars and fuel lines are for diesel trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 11:10 am:

In my part of the woods a "rim" is a wheel without a tire mounted. A wheel being the complete assembly- rim, tire, tube, etc. But then the "spare" in the trunk is a "spare tire". Which becomes a wheel when mounted on the car. Antics with semantics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 01:42 pm:

And Gary, in order to mount that wheel do you use a wrench or a spanner?


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