Gasket Sealant With Neoprene Crankshaft Seal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Gasket Sealant With Neoprene Crankshaft Seal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:17 pm:

I have the engine disassembled for a transmission rebuild and am at the point where I am getting ready to reinstall the oil pan. I used a modern neoprene type crankshaft seal the last time I had the engine apart and canít remember the correct procedure for sealing it against the oil pan. Do you lay a bead of sealant in the recess or fill it up? Should I be concerned with the sealant covering the oil hole that is there to allow excess oil to drain out? Is that oil hole necessary with the neoprene seal? RTV or Permatex #2 (I plan to use Ultra Black for the pan to crankcase surface.)?

I didnít have any oil leakage in this area the last time, so I am hoping for a repeat performance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 09:25 pm:

I use UltraBlack RTV, drain hole isn't important, I fill the groove about 1/4 to 1/3 full - enough to fill the gap around the seal but hopefully not so much to have gross excess. Works for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:17 am:

Most T crank shafts are messed up on the front end and won't seal properly with the rope seal. I like to get a thin chromed or stainless steel crank cover shell and slide it on the front of the crank and then glue on the seal to the front of the timer cover. They come in many sizes. No drip and no clean up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 09:35 am:

Thanks for the responses. I believe my crank surface in this area is ok as the neoprene seal has worked well.

I am still interested in more feedback about how to seal it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 02:24 pm:

Here is a picture of one to correct the front end of a scratched crank shaft. I don't have the number of the part that fits a T, sorry. Part number 99189 on the box is not for a Model T crank shaft.





crank seal sleeve for a bad crank surface


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 12:41 am:

Dan, You are using the best and proven adhesive on your seal with the Permatex Ultra Black. One key thing is to make sure the surfaces are clean and free of any oil or grease. A proper fitting seal is also important. It takes some tweaking of the seal to fit because many times the block and the cover are not on the same plane so a bit of an offset bend is needed. The other thing that insures good adhesion is when you cut and flatten out the lip of the modern seal to look like a daisy flower, those pedals allow lots of sealant to flow and adhere.

Most of the time the sleeve is not needed but a bit of emery is good to polish the surface. This is not a pressure seal so putting it on backwards works fine and requires less room between the crank pulley.
Make sure to let it cure overnight before starting the engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 01:40 am:

Gene,
Good instructions for the fitting of a modern seal externally but Dan is replacing the felt original one in the pan and cover, I still use the felt ones supplied in the gasket set, fitted right I have never had a problem with it on many engine rebuilds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 06:01 am:

Thanks Gene. As Frank mentions, Iím using the neoprene oil seal which is already installed on the crank since I didnít remove the timing cover. Itís this recess in the oil pan (pictures below) that I am asking about sealing. The lower half of the seal will sit down in this recess when I bolt the oil pan to the engine. Do I embed the seal in gasket sealant that Iíve squeezed into this recess? If so how much? Do I have to worry about covering the hole that is already there to allow excess oil to flow back into the pan? Walt already answered these questions but interested in how others do it.




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