Old Photo - Wonder If This Model T Is Still With Us ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Wonder If This Model T Is Still With Us ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 08:09 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 08:18 am:

Hope so but sadly, probably not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 10:21 am:

I would like to think "ol Ernie" at Ernie's Service had just brought that "barn find" home and after he took the picture, he rolled the old T into that garage door and did a full restoration of it. At least that is the story I would like to be true .... have fun and be safe ......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 01:53 pm:

It needs therapy, having just escaped Laurel and Hardy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill on Monday, November 20, 2017 - 08:24 pm:

1918 or so touring made in Canada with the opening driver's door.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 01:36 am:

The car in the background is a late '30s car that looks like it has a few years on it. The buildings look mostly post WWII, so there is a good chance that photo was taken about 1950. Cars were still being scrapped at that time, but also were being picked up and some restored, others parted out. Probably a fair chance that much of it may still be on the road.
One can only wonder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 12:26 pm:

It was barely with us when the photo was taken.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 02:27 pm:

If that car was staged a little better for the photo I bet the forum members would climb over each other to get it. Just imagine it with the door closed, top bows rearranged, windshield upright and the hood on straight. Wouldn't take more then five minutes to do all that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 02:40 pm:

I suspect Ernie was located in Canada, as Kevin (Bill) has pointed out the opening driver's door.

Whilst the car in the background may look pre-war Wayne, it is actually an English Austin A40 'Devon', and they were a post-war production! This was the first post-war car by Austin, and was produced from 1947 (to around 1952). It looked more modern than the first pre-war offerings from Ford of Britain, which really were a carry over from pre-war production.

That the car is in Canada is not surprising - there was some exporting of British cars to Canada (and to the US) during these times.

John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis R on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 02:45 pm:

By today's standards it would be a real find. Post WWII, it was just another "old car". It looks like it was rode hard and about to be put to pasture. There would have been much better examples around to restore. I would have to venture that it was most likely junked. Deep down I hope the old girl made it and is still with us.

I can remember the story of my Dad buying a really nice Model A sedan, pulling the Sears and Roebuck rebuilt motor out for his Roadster, then cutting up the sedan and hauling it to the dump. It was just an old car that had no value. Years later he would always tell me about it whenever we saw a 1930 Tudor Sedan...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 03:39 pm:

In 1947 I bought a center door sedan for $25. Sold it in 1948 for $85. Wanted to buy a 1914 touring for $100, but my Dad said that my 1910 was already a brass front T and one was enough. In 1953 I bought a 1912 (1911 build) for $200, and did not have good storage and sold in for $500. That year bought a nice 1927 roadster for $75 and put NOS fenders on it and sold it for $500. Next year a nice 1927 Hudson sedan for $80 and sold it for $200. Old autos were easy to find and buy at that time. When I did find garages to rent, I would put another Model T in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 03:48 pm:

Dad bought a 1925 Touring in 1940 for $15. He drove it work on his first day at Ford, (Highland Park). He used it in his wedding in 1950. We toured in it as a family all of my life, (so far). He drove it to work on his last day at Ford. Our vacations, friendships, and hobbies have been shaped by it. I drove it on Dad's funeral day. I used it in my wedding in 2017. A very large part of my life has been impacted by $15, spent in 1940. Invest wisely my friends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 06:30 pm:

John S, Wow! I would have almost been willing to bet it was a '36 to'38 General Motors, or could possibly have been a smaller Packard (not being able to see the front of the car doesn't help). Although the cut of the rear fender really doesn't look quite right for either of them. Interesting! Post war Austin. That could make the photo considerably later.

Thank you John S!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 06:46 pm:

Looks better than the first T I bought. At least the body is sort of attached.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 04:00 am:

You are welcome Wayne.

If you think the American auto industru suffered post WW2, you ain't seen nuthin' yet!

Ford-US resurrected the 1941-42 shape, employed some whiz kids and, by 1949, had the Fortyniner.

Ford of Britain resurrected the pre-war Anglia, which survived as the 'Popular' until.... DRUM ROLL... 1959. They also resurrected the similar-looking Prefect and, for 1947, modernised it by chopping off it's stalk-mounted head lights and inserting them into the front of the front guards! That shape survived until about 1952.

Then, to really annoy the home-grown motor industry, the British government repealed the horsepower tax laws. So Ford suddenly needed a big car - their answer was the V8-60 powered Ford Pilot, which really was based upon the 1936 US-Ford V-8.

But, in fairness to Ford of Britain, they were the first away with an all new, post-HP tax car in the Consul and Zephyr 6, which was shaped very similarly to the Fortyniner.

The Ford history is a fascinating one.

Jerry van Ooteghem - what a great tale. You can never sell that car out of your family.

John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 07:00 am:

I believe this T was purchased to save and restore, hence the pic. "Just another old car" would not warrant going home and digging out the camera, checking the film, etc. I believe some far- sighted guy saved this old car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 08:53 am:

John,

No. I will never sell it.

Some have asked for a picture of it. It was painted blue in 1950, to spiff it up for the wedding.



Here's a shot when I was just a little younger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 09:07 am:

Jerry, very interesting story. What color is it now?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 09:18 am:

Good looking car Jerry, Glad that you still have it. It a member of your family.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 09:29 am:

Dean,

It's still blue, just as you see it. The paint is getting kind of bad, but I don't have the heart to repaint it. Everybody knows "Charlie's blue touring". My dad said the color was Bayview Metallic Blue, supposedly a Mercury color in the 50's. I never looked into that.

Yes, it is a member of the family. And an old friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 04:05 pm:

It has had the "wrong" wheels and color for much longer than it had the "right" color and wheels. That is more correct to the car now than how it left the factory would be. It is part of the car's history, its life, and part of your family. It should be preserved like that, loved, and enjoyed.
Thank you for sharing with us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 04:35 pm:

The Mercury Comets in the 60's were painted a blue that was really close to to that color blue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 02:44 am:

From afar...

I really do love such stories as Jerry's.

No amount of money in the back pocket could compensate for the loss of such a family member. Jerry is so fortunate to have something so tactile that has come from past generations that he can continue weaving into the coming generations.

And Wayne is right - her blue coat is part of her story.

John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 08:56 am:

chances are if any part of that T survived at all it was the tool box from the running board. I have a old box,i need to dig out,that came from a old Caterpillar that my grandfather ran many years ago.The more I think about it,the more I remember it looking like a T tool box.Those things were versatile long after the car was gone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Jull in Oakland on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 10:13 am:

Looks like a photo around August 1961 according to the printing in the left. That being the case. I think that it has s better chance of surviving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 05:22 pm:

I'm glad someone else found the date on the photo. :-)

That's a really neat looking blue!


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