Replacing a fuel tank on a 1915 Touring Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Replacing a fuel tank on a 1915 Touring Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 06:29 am:

I have been asked to install a new fuel tank on a 1915 Touring Car. It looks like it would be a tricky job. Has anybody actually changed one with the body still on?

The Local Guruís here have never had the need to do such a job. I would imagine that although it is an Australian Duncan & Fraser Bodied Tourer the task would be similar to all 1915 with the tank under the front seat?
Thank you in advance
Alan in Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 08:11 am:

I think Steve Jelf had to do one on his 1915 Roadster, contact him for tips:

http://www.mtfca.com/cgi-bin/discus/board-profile.cgi?action=view_profile&profil e=steve_jelf_parkerfield_ks-users


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 08:18 am:

Alan all I can say is I've replaced the fuel tank on my '12 Comm. Roadster, it wasn't all that bad. I had a '15, but the tank was already new. I can't remember exactly how it all looked under there, but I can't for the life of me see how it could be any more difficult. Biggest/hardest thing is just getting your hands up in the frame area to unbolt the brackets. There wasn't much room for hands to pull the tank out, but I believe I had all the floor boards out and pushed it up with one hand and grabbed it best I could reaching up and over the front seat support. I had mine up on a lift of course, which naturally makes things a bit simpler. Hope this helps. It's not that hard really.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 09:28 am:

Shouldn't be to hard of a job. T Touring cars with the tanks under the front seat are 'generally' the same when removing one.
The 19 Roadster and 21 Touring that I have both come out the same way.
It takes a little dexterity to get to nuts and bolts that hold the brackets to the frame.
Use what ever you need to such a box end, vise grips, socket wrench or what ever to remove the nuts and bolts.

The hardest thing might be in removing the cotter pins if the bolts have never been off.
This is one area where I used lock washers when I put the tanks back on. Much easier than the cotter pins. I'm not a purist so it was OK for me.



It's a LOT easier to do than replacing transmission bands!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phillip Maurici on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 09:45 am:

My 1913 Touring gas tank can not be removed without removing body. It does not fit through seat opening. Lacks about 3/8 inch.
I was able to change the tank in my 1917 runabout from seat opening without any problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 09:55 am:

When I installed the new tank in my 1915 runabout there was no need to remove the body. I assume a touring would be the same.


There's even enough room for a home made storage box behind the tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 10:38 am:

I changed the gas tank on the very original 1914 Touring that belongs to the S D Automotive Museum a few years ago. As I remember it was quite tight, but was possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 03:14 pm:

I would NOT bet that a Duncan and Fraser would be like a USA standard body. They could have made it better? I have helped change a tank on a '15 runabout for a friend. We were able to get it, however it was quite awkward getting by the wood seat frame, requiring one above, and one below ('15 bodies varied quite a lot depending upon supplier). On the other hand, D&F could have built the body around the delivered chassis, and made it tight enough to not quite come out at all.
Good luck! I wish I could come over and help. I would love to get my hands on an Australian D&F car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Friday, November 24, 2017 - 12:51 am:

Thank you guys and I will let you know how it goes.
Wayne, there are aeroplanes coming here every day, grab one! We will look after you. Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 24, 2017 - 01:08 am:

(Laughing out loud!) I may be available for adoption? 65 years old, knees shot, broke and crazy. But all that just makes me interesting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Friday, November 24, 2017 - 02:46 am:

Alan,
I would have thought one of the guys with a Duncan and Fraser body would have chipped in by now.

I personally don't have access to one to make an opinion, can only add one of the NSW owners has a Steenbhoms bodied 1912 and a previous owner decided to replace the tank.

The only way to get the old one out and replace it was to saw the timber around the seat top frame.

Not only did they do it badly they discarded the removed timber which had stamped on it the body number. Did no good to the originality and value of the car.

I would be inclined to lift the body, most probably be easier and quicker than struggling to get the old one out and replace the new one anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, November 24, 2017 - 04:39 pm:

Alan, if this is the D and F I sent to the west, it was restored in the 1970's, so getting the nuts and bolts to release should not be too hard. If you measure the gap in the seat frame against the diameter of the tank, that will give you a good idea if lifting the tank might be possible. We use a short length of seat belt webbing when lifting/replacing batteries in later cars. The same should work for this job.

That said, the bodies were fitted to the chassis after building, so it just may never happen as e would like it.

Allan from down under.


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