Making a Spare Tire Cover

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Making a Spare Tire Cover
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 08:58 am:

I didn't like the reproduction tire covers so decided to I make my own. Based on the remains of a vintage example I found in eBay, I sewed this from cotton duck. Has three main panels and made to fit a mounted oversize 30 x 3 1/2 tire. Also included a seam to insert a stiff wire along the inside edge to keep the material tight.

The last image shows painting the cover. I wrapped the mounted rim with cling wrap and put the cover on that to support it while painting with black enamel. This is after the second coat. After the third coat dries I'll install the snaps that will pull the cover together at the bottom end.

sewing

sewing detail

painting cover


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 10:08 am:

I love the old sewing machine Mark is that a White?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 10:13 am:

Neat project! It sure looks like a White sewing machine, scroll to the bottom of this page:

http://possumjimandelizabeth.com/xhtml/collect_sewing_white2.html

(Message edited by cudaman on November 28, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 10:20 am:

The sewing machine is a "Domestic" ... good for canvas. Used it for making the leather seat covers on my old speedster. But actually it doesn't hold a candle to the ever-so-more-neat 1880s Howard tower clock in the background of the first picture. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 10:58 am:

My dad reproduced a tire cover for his 1927 Hupmobile about 45 years ago - he has a commercial Singer sewing machine from the 1920s. He had the original tire cover for a pattern.

The reproduction is leatherette, like the original. Like the original, it also has an elastic cord sewn in the rear perimeter to keep it snug on the tire. No snaps, no wire.

This was an an original unrestored car with its original two-tone green paint with pinstripes - only 10,000 miles when my dad bought it. The spare tire was original to the car.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:34 am:

That is good work and time well spent.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:13 pm:

There were different types. Some had steel wires or flat springs sewn into or inserted into the material to maintain the shape ... others had elastic. I thought the wire in cotton duck would be typical based on the catalog descriptions and the original I had.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 03:22 pm:

I have an aftermarket spare tire cover for Model T Fords that my dad picked up at least 65 years ago (it was NOS at the time). It dates from the late 20s.

It is made of very thin geometrically embossed black oil cloth/leatherette (reminds me of a nylon raincoat) but it has become quite stiff and now can easily be torn.

The front outer perimeter has piping with wood cane inside.

The rear inner perimeter has wire in it. The wire has a ring on the end. The wire goes through a screw that has a washer and wing nut. Once you have tightened the wire, you screw down the wing nut against the wire to keep it tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 12:57 am:

Ever-so-much-more-so? You never read that did you?
Looking good!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ivan on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 02:37 am:

Going by the presence of the glass china cabinet and the Edison phonograph, I take it that is not your workshop, so that means the spare tyre is sitting on mum's dining table ?
And you survived ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 07:32 am:

Well ... a lot of things happen on that old table and not just by me. We often give photography workshops in out studio (first picture) and generally we use the dining room table for other hand work during those workshops.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 07:33 am:

Whoops ... I meant the last of my pictures shows part of our skylight photography studio.


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