OT> Trailer tires

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT> Trailer tires
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:23 am:

The tires on my boat trailer are getting tired. It has LT225/75-R16 with a load range (E). I canít seem to find that size around me. I can find a tire/wheel combo 225/75-15 load range (D). The boat is a 22ft Fiberglass with a C8 GM drive. Itís plenty heavy. Can I safely use the 15 inch tire or should I stay with the 16ís?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:31 am:

Using LT (Light Truck) tires on a trailer is a big mistake. Regardless of 15" or 16", what's important is using ST (Special Trailer) tires. ST tires have significantly different sidewall flex characteristics needed for safe tailed towing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:32 am:

....trailer towing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:44 am:

Goodyear Endurance trailer tires.

Made in America ..... :-)

I buy mine at Discount Tire or Americaís Tire Store - same company.

I get the road hazard certificates.

If you donít have a retail location near you, you can buy them online.

FJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 01:03 pm:

I used to run Goodyear Marathons until they were made abroad and I started experiencing side-wall blow outs. Then I switched to Kumho 857's. No issues with them at all...and they have a 90 mph speed rating. Lots of trailer tires only have a 60 mph speed rating, so normal highway driving is beyond their ratings. Many of the problem people experience with trailer tires can be traced back to the fact they are run under-inflated. Trailer tires are designed to be run fully inflated according to the number on the sidewall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

Will: you don't have a Sam's Club?
https://www.samsclub.com/sams/lt225-75r16e-atr/prod6230194.ip?searchTerm=LT225/7 5-R16


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:04 pm:

I agree with FJ. Goodyear Endurance made in America. More expensive but well worth it. Made a 2,000 mile round trip to pick up a TT, one weekend. They were perfect and felt great on the trailer, loaded or not loaded.

Keep in mind, load rating AND speed rating. Use ST type. You will be much happier in the end.

Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

GR - those are light truck tires. Henry advises against those.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:49 pm:

I tow over 300 days a year.

I have been running Gooodyear Endurance ST trailer
tires all this year.

I buy trailer tires at Discount Tire/Americaís Tire Store
because they are one of the few national chains
that offer free ( not pro-rated tread wear ) replacement
for trailer tires due to non-repairable damage in the tread
and the side wall.

FJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 03:52 pm:

I agree with Will and FJ.
My first trailer (used) came with bad tires, and a Goodyear tire dealer suggested I replace them with LT tires (I don't know why and didn't know any better then! Maybe he didn't have any ST's). Two blew out the sidewalls reasonably soon, another tire dealer explained why, and at his suggestion replaced all with ST. Never had a problem after that. Just glad both times I had double axles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 04:35 pm:

Stay away from BLOW MAX in that size. (TOW MAX) They like to blow the side wall out at around 1500 miles.

Also: Most people do not but, if you blow a tire on a 2 axle trailer you should change BOTH tires on that side. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Hammatt on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 12:49 am:

My recent tire experience while towing: in the past three years I've had three trailer tire failures. I run ST tires at full rated pressure, all the failures were due to air loss. Here's the rub: all three failures were mounted on the right rear axle. My local truck and trailer tire supplier store guy, whom I've known for over 20 years, pointed out to me that in his experience with OTR truck and trailers, it's the right rear tires that most often fail. His thoughts (affirmed by others I've talked with) are that the road crown deliberetly forces the road trash (nails, etc.) off the road to the right shoulder.
Then the front tire kicks up the debris and it's caught by the right rear tire. I just finished a 40 days period driving 12k+ miles with no blowouts. I make sure I stay away from the far right edge of the right lane. Seems to be working for now!
Anyone else have a pattern of dual axle trailers having right rear tire problems?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 01:35 am:

Yes, the front tire sets up the nail or screw to puncture the rear tire.
At work on every oil change job we carefully check the tires for nails.
We almost never find a nail in the left rear tire and I donít recall ever finding anything in the left front.
All the junk on the road gets picked up by those before you, so stay off the far right side and shoulders because not much traffic gets over there to pick up the junk before you.
My daily driver, my wifeís car and one of my daughterís cars all have plugs in the right rear.
My son has a Ford Exploder with a screw causing a leak in the left rear.
Yup, the rear tires catch hell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 10:01 pm:

I have 700-15, 8 ply tires om my stock trailer. They are Chinese specials from Crawford Smith in Greenville, Texas, $59 each installed. My flatbed has trailer tires the local trailer builder installed when he built the trailer. So far all is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

Ted,are those radials?
I am wondering as someone told me to put bias ply tires on my tandem as they would last longer than radials.
It has St205/75D15 Transmasters on it.I got the trailer in 08 or 09 and the tires were already cracking and it was a 2005 trailer with very little use. So needless to say,now they are worthless,but I have not been able to use the trailer lately anyway. Brake system is messed up.
I was quoted 300 bucks for a new set about a month ago. When i get the T pickup finished,I am going to put the trailer in the shop to reworked the surge brakes and put new tires on it.
I am odd in 1 thing,I have all trailer tires balanced. It may be a waste of time but I can't see how it hurts anything as it should decrease vibration and wear and tear on the trailer and bearings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 11:23 pm:

This seems to be a good deal,it would cost me another 48 bucks to get them mounted. I think the 1's i was quoted 300 for were a off brand. These are radials though.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4-NEW-ST205-75R15-Ultra-CRT-Trailer-Tire-205-75-15-TIRE -ONLY/253229658820?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D41375 %26meid%3D7a782d44fedf457f961614db4ddf37e2%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26s d%3D172709994512&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 02:53 am:

I had always believed that LT Tyres were the best option on a car trailer and was surprised to see my new car trailer has ST coded tyres. I had to google this to see what it was all about.

The story was impressive and it sounded good especially the bit about stiff side walls to reduce sway. I have left them on the trailer and also purchased two identical ones as spares.

One would hope that regardless of brand all ST Tyres comply to the standard....

Alan in Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 03:10 am:

FYI
http://www.vehicletire.com/Complaint/Power+King/Towmax


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 04:58 am:

Oh dear, it seems all brands are not equal. Mine arenít that brand but similar scenario with only one Model T on a 4 wheel trailer. I run mine at 55psi and drop em down to 39psi when parked up for long periods
Alan in a Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 10:15 am:

From what I have been told, all trailer tires from china come out of the same plant. You have to get into the 14 ply tires before they are made any better. My Blow Max tires would got to about 1500 and then the side wall would blow out. I went to 14 ply before I got some that would stay on. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 10:50 am:

If you go on a forum for travel trailers and motorhomes, you will find the same discussions, and the consensus seems to be to stay away from "MADE IN CHINA". Since there has not been many alternatives for ST type tires, many have gone to LT tires in desperation.
I originally had Goodyear Marathon tires on our camper, and they were MADE IN CANADA. They gave me excellent service, but doe to age, I finally decided to replace them. As the Marathons had held up very well, I decided to go with the same, but after i had purchased and had them mounted, I discovered to my horror the dreaded "MADE IN CHINA" on the side walls. I called Goodyear, but got the old song and dance about " OUR TIRES MEET THE SAME STANDARDS REGARDLESS OF WHAT PLANT THEY ARE MADE IN". I was P. O'ed, and swore I'd never again buy a tire from Goodyear!
Fast forward to this summer. The last set of Marathons were getting old enough, that I decided to replace them. They did not have many miles on them, as we got busy moving 8 years ago and have not camped since. The helpful people at the tire store recommended, of all things, Goodyear tires, and they quoted speed ratings way beyond what the old Marathons had, so I got interested, as I thought that with the much higher speed ratings, they had to be made better. Then came the fact that made me very happy. They were marked "MADE IN THE U. S. A.", and they were the "ENDURANCE".
I think Goodyear finally got the message about the Chinese crap and decided to fix the problem once and for all. They do monitor the pertinent fora on the internet, you know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 07:47 am:

I just put a set of Endurance Goodyears on one of my enclosed Trailers. they look like a good tire. When I was having so much trouble with the Blow Maxs, the new Goodyears were not being made. I plan to sell that trailer, so I may not ever put any more tires on it. But if I do they will be Goodyears made in the USA. By the way, I found the best price at Tire Rack. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 10:44 am:

I've been following this thread since the beginning. I'm just amazed at the trouble folks have with small trailers. I'm not saying it's the owners fault, just amazed in general.

I ran my own 18 wheeler for most of my adult life. I never had much trouble. Sure, I blew a tire and had a lot of flats, but nothing like folks here have. Do the trailer tires just not have enough safety factor built in? I suspect so.

Consider the tri-axle coal truck I saw in Kentucky years ago. 14 wheels- 105,000#. Everyday. Another at the same place was a straight tandem - 10 wheels, 90,000#. Again, everyday. These tires were so overloaded that it looks like they should have blown immediately, yet, they did it everyday.

I suspect that the trailer tires we buy today are just loaded to the limit with nothing extra.

I don't trailer much, but I did drive to Stan Howe's years ago to pick up a TT. It was just a tandem trailer with 4 tires. Car tires to boot. No problem. Another time, I went to Huntsville, AL with a TT. Again, no problem.

Maybe I'm just lucky.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 11:43 am:

Lucky?? Yes at those weight's and axle loads your lucky the DOT did not spot you!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 03:14 pm:

You're right Bud, but it wasn't me. It was at a tipple in East Bernstadt, KY. It's long gone now.

Another example was a fellow that used to put two loads on an old Schneider trailer. 85,000 payload. His gross was about 115,000.
The point I was making was that these tires would take the overload and still hold together. Small trailer tire don't even come close to holding up like that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 03:52 pm:

Fred,When i was in excavating i hauled a 37 ton bulldozer and a 40 ton excavator on a 4 axle lowboy with a old semi.I had to drive the route first and call the county.I'm glad i do not do it any more as school bus drivers scared the hell out of me!! We went on a cruse this fall and for the first time in over 20 years i did not drive for farmers.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 07:23 pm:

Bud - We need to get together some time and swap old truckin' tales. Back in the late 70's, I hauled beans out of about everywhere south of Mt. Pleasant....your neck of the woods. Red Proctor was the broker. Did you know him? He's gone now, but his garage is still up there on the southeast corner of M15 & M81. Good times. Fuel was less than a buck. Oh how times change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 08:29 pm:

Fred,I have hauled dry beans north west of Edmore,Mi but i'm not a real trucker as we have few hills! When i was pushing and digging off road red was .50 a gal and even with the buzen dozen on high boil i could not get 25 gal per hour through it!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

The trouble started when the tires started coming from china. Just like when Model T Tires started coming from the VC. I would haul stuff and never have tire trouble till then. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 09:04 pm:

Is there any kind of ointments or chemicals we can put on tires to prevent their cracking prematurely?
Tires in general are getting to be a sore subject for me.You would think folks making tires would realize the tire should last until it wears out.Not 2 or 3 years.
I just sold my 1978 F350 this week. When I got it in 2008,I spent a good bit on it fixing the problems. I bought 700 dollars worth of Faulken radials for it.Within 3 years I saw small cracks. It had been broke down for a while and i got it running a month ago.To drive it on a road trip and not be puckered up,I needed tires again. LESS than 500 miles on those tires and they are rotted worse than the 1950 20 inch Goodyear tires I have on the back of my TT that came off a old Packard.

My Coopers I bought for the Cadi,a short time later after I bought the Faulkens, on the other hand,are in great shape,well some tread wear but no cracks. If Cooper can make a good tire,why in the sam heck can't the rest of them?
Hankook makes some good tires,but I don't know of any trailer tires.But I am getting great service from the 1's I have.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 09:16 pm:

Another question I have.If a tire says, Maximum pressure 50 pounds for example,is that like the redline for pressure? I understand the tire gets hot and the air inside expands,which means if you put the max of 50 pounds in it,it will get hot and have 60 pounds in it. Seems that would cause blow out.
I found this to,seems to help explain the radial-bias ply question I had.
https://www.etrailer.com/question-134201.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, December 03, 2017 - 05:48 pm:

I don't think any of the trailer tires are radials. I know the Chinese tires are not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, December 03, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

Most if not all tires state "cold pressure".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, December 03, 2017 - 06:59 pm:

I recently re-tired (8) both my Pace enclosed & flat-deck trailers with Carlisle ST rated tires and they are all radials.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, December 03, 2017 - 07:01 pm:

Perhaps I'm thinking of the inside door sticker - not the tire itself ?


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