Axle gear

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Axle gear
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Wilson - Omaha NE on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

I know it has been posted before, but I am not finding it. How is the gear removed from the end of the axle shaft in the rear axle? The gear is pressed down to release the keeper, and then pulled off? Any tips on how it is done? thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:10 pm:

If the axle is junk, I cut it off leaving a stub a couple inches long sticking out past the gear. It's much easier to press it apart that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:12 pm:

You have it right Doug. A heavy-duty hydraulic press is a must for removing it properly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Wilson - Omaha NE on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:31 pm:

Thanks, I passed this on to my machine shop operator. I'll bet they go on a new axle much easier then they will come off of the old


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:40 pm:


Found it easier to take a photocopy of Ford Service instructions to any machine shop today so they know how to work on the T.

Those lock rings can fool anyone who hasn't been there!

New axles and new lock rings and instructions go to the machine shop with my old axles to replace the gears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:46 pm:

John is right, it takes a beefy press to get the gears on and off. My little 12 ton Harbor Freight press wasn't up to the job, I had to take my axles to a shop with a 30 ton press.

I did cut the old axles before having the gears pressed off. No such option pressing the gears onto the new axles, be sure you or the shop you take them to takes extra precautions to restrain the axles to keep them restrained during the press operation. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 02:54 pm:

And worth mentioning is to strive to keep the woodruff key flush with the gear. Otherwise that end of the key will grind on the Hyatt bearing cage.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 03:44 pm:

To Dan's point, if the end of the key is proud of the gear surface after pressing on the gear, the key can be "adjusted" to be flush using a hammer and punch (at least it worked for me). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 05:17 pm:

I bent a couple axles before I was told to set the tapered end in a rear axle hub to steady it while pressing the gear on . Before, I used an axle nut screwed on backwards. Like I say, I bent a few that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles F. Bass on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 05:52 pm:

Greetings,

I am also replacing the rear axles on my '13 touring and was able to remove the gears quite easily with my 60 ton press.. Reference the message above, can you clarify? When you say "hub", you mean axle housing? if that's correct, you are using the two bearings inside the housing to steady the axle shaft? FYI, I'm doing the rear end over because the passenger side wheel had a horizontal play of about 3/8", the thrust washers were in little pieces spread around the differential unit. Replacing the ring and pinion, differential cage, etc..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 06:07 pm:

Charles, I am referring to a rear wheel hub, the part the tapered end of the axle goes into. Take a rear hub without the rest of the wheel, and place it on the bottom rung of the press leaving room, of course for the end of the axle to pass thru. I use a couple of iron plates.
It keeps the axle lined up when you press on the gear from above. I use antiseize in the hub so the axle releases after the pressing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

Has anyone used a toaster oven to warn up the gear prior to installing the gear on a bare axle. I took 2 axles with gears down to where I used to work, and ask the guys to swap good gear to good axle. They seceded in spoiling both the good axle and the good gear and also my knockoff puller. then found another axle and harvested a good axle and gear. Just wondering about the toaster oven?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

I used a socket and hammer to drive the gear down, then a puller to remove the gear. I had a machine shop press the gear on the axle. Now that I have a press I will press the gear on myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

I change these gears for $10. Free if you buy the new axle shaft from me.

I have a $3k Dake hydraulic press with a very accurate pressure gauge and it is pretty unusual that any axle gear requires more than 5 tons to remove. Occasionally I have one that may require 10-15 tons before it snaps loose, but then presses the rest of the way with just a couple tons. What you do need is a very large (tall) press.

I also find that quite a few gears are worn and/or oversize, are too loose on the shafts, and require replacement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 09:37 pm:

I froze the axle and heated the gear. Used a press and worked fast


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 05:54 am:

Even with the axle taper supported in a hub, an axle can still be bent if too much pressure is applied to the gear. An occasional gear can require great force to have it let go. I ruined a good axle this way. It really needed a relatively close fitting sleeve to stop it deforming under heavy load. If the axle is toast, it is easy to cut it off at the inner bearing journal and press it of from there. If the gear is toast and will not easily press off, it might just pay to slit it with a cutting disc.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 09:58 am:

I built a "retaining" cage years ago to facilitate axle gear replacement AFTER I bent a new axle although there were underlying issues with the machine work of that axle. I also use a hub on my press base for the axle taper to rest in with a new shim covering the keyway slot.


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