A Friend

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: A Friend
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 09:44 am:

So I have this friend who, about a decade ago, introduced me to the Model T hobby. -Well, a few seasons back, ne notices how my front end seems loose and that week he shows up with some specialized tools and re-bushes my front spindles for me. -Now, they're solid as the hinges on a bank vault. -So recently, he gets wind of how I'm planning to get my front wheels rebuilt and how I'll then need to sand, stain and varnish the unfinished wood. -So he takes some aluminum stock, sticks it on a lathe and turns out this custom-made, rotating fixture for sanding and brushing finish on Model T ball bearing-type front wheels, and he drops by and gives it to me.

What a pal, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dufault on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Maybe a return to you for all the nice things you've done for others. :-)

Sure would be a wonderful world if we returned love and kindness to others instead of this
"an eye for an eye" mentality that seems to be prevalent these days.

An early Christmas present to you :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Bruno on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 10:49 am:

That's great I started with my first Model A in 1970 and back then got help from a few car guys before even joining a club. Learned most about the A by trial and error. Now with two Model A's under my belt I've been able to help out some new comers to the hobby. Now that I have recently started with Model T's there are some helpful people right in my area that I can call on if i have questions. Just a great hobby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 12:23 pm:

I'm with David. If I lived closer you would definitely have another pair of hands (mine) ready to help out with Model T needs.

Bob, you really made my season about five years ago when you gave me a couple rear view mirrors I was really keen on buying but which had been pulled from production "indefinitely. I didn't say much about it at the time - I thought my car would be finished fairly quick and then I could post pictures and thanks all at the same time.

I am so looking forward to looking rearward and seeing whatever is there clearly. :-)

So, a heartfelt THANKS to you Bob!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 01:25 pm:

Bob, Any details on the wheel jig, so we might make our own?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

Will get back to you with some photos and measurements, Thomas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 06:40 pm:

If you have a Work Mate folding table you'll find it's excellent at holding you spoked wheel steady for sanding + it's good for many other uses besides the wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 06:44 pm:

One other thing: the best thing I've found for sanding multiple spokes is cut down belt sander belts. Cut into 1" wide strips X whatever length you buy. They last longer than any sandpaper you'll ever use. Use the old shoe shine action & you'll be pleasantly surprised at how fast it goes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 06:47 pm:

Karma Bob. Thats a great friend!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Friday, December 01, 2017 - 08:52 pm:

I have been blessed with a couple of Model T friends like that, as well. Thank you for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 04:55 am:

Charlie, I have a Black & Decker Work Mate table. It came in real handy for rebuilding the rear axle. My workshop had a very low ceiling and I couldn't lift the upper axle half off of the assembly when it was time to adjust the thrust washers so I removed the axle holder from the work bench and mounted it on the Work Mate out in the garage where the ceiling was quite high. Problem solved!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, December 02, 2017 - 10:57 am:

I'm blessed in that I've been the recipient of quite a lot of kindness.

Another time was when my engine was running too rough to attempt driving the car. -A forum friend, whom I had not previously met face to face, came all the way out to Long Island from New Jersey with a compression tester. -He departed with my coils and they arrived back at my home about a week later, tuned up like the New York Philharmonic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

Thomas Mullin,

Here is a photo with dimensions, as you requested.



The "Front Wheel Jig" amounts to two aluminum discs on a threaded rod with several nuts to hold things in place. -The big disc (3 3/16ths" diameter) goes up against the inboard part of the wheel hub and the smaller disc (1 11/16ths" diameter) fits inside outboard side of the hub, either up against the ball-bearings or, if you remove the ball bearings, up against the race (Relax, aluminum is soft).

The little nuts are jammed together in pairs to keep the fixture from tightening up as you rotate the wheel. -Obviously, you don't want it to be any tighter than necessary. -The larger nuts are also jammed together in pairs with the flats lined up so it can be secured in a vice.


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