More splattered brass

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: More splattered brass
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 04, 2017 - 05:57 pm:

I was very aware of oil pans being sealed with brass.




Today I blasted this steering connecting rod and unearthed another example.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, December 04, 2017 - 05:59 pm:

Is it also pinned?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Monday, December 04, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

All totally normal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, December 04, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

Steve, you'll likely find it on steering columns and handbrake cross shafts also.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Monday, December 04, 2017 - 11:00 pm:

Brazzing was done many area of tge3 model T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 - 09:49 am:

In Ford Methods & Ford Shops, 1915, pg 91-92 "Brazing Operations" are discussed for the engine pan and an illustration for 'tie rod' end brazing is shown. The clevis fittings were slip fitted on rod ends along with a piece of brazing rod in the cavity. Rod ends were then brazed automatically in an oven that melted the brass as the assembly moved on a conveyor. The worker fitted the parts, adding the brass rod and placed the part on the conveyor going into the oven, the brazed assembly emerged from the oven and was removed from the conveyor and sent to the next operation.

The detail of engine pan assembly includes stamping, forming, brazing, straightening and leak testing along with all machine and hand operations, but that is off topic here.

Many of you likely have the book, but here is the link if you don't:

https://books.google.com/books?id=TcAqZt9U4gQC&printsec=frontcover&dq=ford+metho ds+and+ford+shops&hl=en&ei=HgBxTZB9iPqwA-OR3MML&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&re snum=1&ved=0CDoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false


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