Window film for old T non saftey glass windows

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Window film for old T non saftey glass windows
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Davis on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 - 11:15 pm:

I wonder if anyone has used clear or tinted window film on their old T plate glass.
it is not a substitute for safety glass, but might help in a accident, to keep from getting badly cut up ? I have seen safety glass windows with window tint hold together even though the glass is shattered in a thousand pieces seems like it would provide some degree of protection on plate glass breakage ? and be better than nothing ? They make a commercial film that is so strong it will stop a man with a sledge hammer from breaking through a store front plate glass window.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 - 11:44 pm:

Hum,looking forward to responses to this as I have a great complete windsheild setup all it needs is bolted up for my project.Film might would save some funds


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:55 am:

Is someones life worth the price of glass? Plate glass does not shatter into a thousand pieces it breaks in big long pointed jugular ripping pieces that would pierce any plastic film you might put over it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 01:06 am:

Some tours won't let you run if you have the old plate glass. Check with any FLAT glass company and they can cut new glass. My opinion...GET RID of that old plate glass, it's dangerous....Use it as a pattern for new safety glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:04 am:

Sharp shards of broken glass will cut through thin plastic skin as easily as human skin. -That stuff may be able to hold together when safety glass breaks, but not regular plate-glass. -Oh, I suppose applying the plastic sheeting couldn't hurt, but to say it's better than nothing might be an exaggeration. -Getting into an accident with a Model T would be plenty bad enough, but broken glass would only compound that situation. -Replace flat plate-glass with safety glass and replace curved glass with easy-to-shape plexiglas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:30 am:

Just bought safety glass for a 26 Fordor all nine pieces...$450.00. Cheap insurance!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:41 am:

Laminated glass is not tempered, or at least not all of it. It doesn't pierce the plastic lamination. 3M offers a film that is intended to be used to prevent smash and grab robberies in jewelry stores and the like. Only thing is, they don't sell it to individuals. You have to have a dealer install it. For simple flat windows in most older cars, it's not worth it. I have a particular application that isn't suited for laminated, as it is too thick. I have looked into the safety film. I may have it done or I may have some glass tempered. Haven't decided yet. But the stuff IS out there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:49 am:

Jim, I wanted my ‘23 as original as possible down to the seats and floorboards. But I opted for safety glass when I reworked the windshield assembly. It was only about $100, looks great and I have the peace of mind to know I won’t be cut to ribbons in an accident. I still have the original plate glass in safe storage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Clary on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:53 am:

It doesn't even need to be an accident for plate glass to fail. As much as we would like to keep things original, this is one area to upgrade.

Andy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:37 am:

My great-grandfather was killed by a huge shard of plate glass that nearly decapitated him in what would've otherwise been a relatively minor Model T accident.

My grandfather was traumatized by it and would never ride in an old car with plate glass.

The very first thing I did when I bought my 24 was get rid of the plate glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:56 am:

Plate glass is ok- if your car is a museum piece on static display!


Spend the $$ on safety glass


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 09:02 am:

I just replaced the glass on my 25 for under $75! Professional installation of the film would probably be 2/3 of that and if you do it yourself how much is your time worth? JMHOFWIW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 09:25 am:

I have done a lot of looking into this because the glass in my Centerdoor needs to be replaced. My interior is original and in great condition so I am reluctant to start removing it to replace the glass so I looked into mylar coating as a substitute. What I found is that they make mylar coatings that are being used in store fronts that are designed to withstand severe impact similar to the shock wave from a bomb. I thought that would be a viable alternative until I brought the car down to the shop to have it applied. The owner would not do it because he said it requires a lot of water being used to get a proper application and he was afraid it would destroy the door panels. So the answer is that the coatings may very well be a viable substitute that is cost effective (less than 1/2 the cost of glass replacement) if you are redoing the interior also but, in my opinion, if it wasn't for the interior upholstery issue I would replace the glass. Has anyone ever replaced the glass in a '22 Centerdoor without disturbing the interior panels? That year has the strap risers in the rear side windows but has the latching mechanism in the front and middle side windows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 09:50 am:

I expect that when a shard slices through your eyeball and pierces your brain it's very disappointing. Safety glass is a wise choice and relatively inexpensive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 10:22 am:

I made my living for 28 years with window films — solar control, privacy, decorative, and safety/security films. Acres and acres of the stuff. They are an ideal or at least cost-effective solution to many problems.

Unfortunately, like most products they can be oversold and the hype around security films was always an issue. (We used to joke that those vendors who bragged up the ballistics resistance of their wares ought to literally stand behind their products.)

A quality clear safety/security film, properly applied, to both sides of the glass, will definitely strengthen existing plate glass and provide a measure of protection in event of accident.

However, I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS APPROACH.

Cosmetically it will be compromised, laminated safety glass is more effective, and little or no money will be saved.

Over those 28 years we only filmed two windshields. One for a friend's rarely-driven Model A with irreplaceable period windshield decals, the other for my '26 very original T Touring.

Photos of my install follow. I am considering getting rid of the filmed original and replacing it with new laminated safety glass. Like I should have done in the first place.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

Jim,

Please don't even consider this... Do the right thing and have no regrets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

All the glass is gone or broken in our 26 coupe. I only consider safety glass, even if it says so in the corner for everyone to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

I had this stuff on 2 west facing windows in my house. Really kept the heat down in the summer. 3 years ago during the winter a tree branch broke one of the windows and the tint just shattered along with the glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 05:22 pm:

Charlie - window tint film and safety film are completely different. I'd still say it's best to just go with the laminated glass.

Vern, you won't have a logo on the glass if you get laminated. Laminated flat glass will be cut from a sheet at your local glass show. Interesting process involving lighter fluid and fire!

Tempered glass often has the logo so you know it's tempered. Probably required by code for places where it is required in a building. You can order it with no logo if you want. I used to do that all the time when we were using it as a base for a decorative glass product.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:11 pm:

Correct me if I am wrong; glass that is tempered is cut first then sent out to be tempered, not just cut and installed.
Laminated glass, didn't really forget the fire thing when cutting it but that was like back around 1973 last time I got to watch it being done. (for my 1946 Dodge 1 ton, I was the 2ed owner)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

Ok so the tape thing is not a affordable option.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 09:42 pm:

Correct that glass can't be cut once it is tempered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 01:09 am:

Mark, that is correct — tempered glass needs to be cut, polished, drilled, or whatever, prior to the tempering process.


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