2 Owner, Model K Roadster For Sale at Auction

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 2 Owner, Model K Roadster For Sale at Auction
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 11:31 am:

Here's a good one for the die-hard early Ford fan. Looks like a nice original car. The wheels appear to be later. When was the last time you saw one for sale publicly?

https://www.rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/AZ18/Arizona/lots/r136-1907-ford-model-k- roadster/545284


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 11:39 am:

I have a Maxwell matchbox model that is about the same blue, I like both! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:01 pm:

I don't think the fan belt is stock, but looks like a nice start but the price they are expecting just caused my wallet to snap shut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:03 pm:

Those are some great photos. It appears that each cylinder has one plug with a wire from a coil and another with a wire directly from the magneto. Is that right? How does it work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:07 pm:

One set of plugs is fired by the timer and coils (just like a T) which are powered by a battery. The other set is fired by the high tension, Bosch magneto. The switch lets you choose which ignition system you want. Typically, you start the car on battery (using timer/coils) then switch to the magneto system. Of course, either could be used as back up if one fails or the battery dies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:37 pm:

I do not know when the V less take a part belt was invented but at the least 60 years ago! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

That style belt is common on early cars. The idea is you simply add or subtract links depending on the desired length. Auto parts stores didn't carry pre-made, brand/model specific belts for cars in the early 1900s.
Restoration Supply Company and others sell reproductions of this adjustable, link fan belt today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 01:13 pm:

It is amazing how much the brass era cars go for. I will never afford one at that price.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 01:27 pm:

might bring more if they polished that brass...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 01:57 pm:

Jim, there's brass era and there's Brass Era. When it's one of only ten survivors like this, especially pre-T, there go the prices. Later in the brass era, there are bargains to be had.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Jorgensen, Batavia, IL on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

I have often heard that it is better to have a friend who owns a boat, rather than own a boat yourself. Aren't we all lucky that we get to "ride along" with Rob Heyen and his Model K through his many videos!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:05 pm:

Rob better snatch this one up. He has two daughters and cannot favor one over the other. One red car and one blue car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:36 pm:

Hoping Rob joins in. I would like to know more about this car if he has any information.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:38 pm:

Ron, thank you for posting.

A few things I've noticed after a quick look. The wheels look like Firestone or other brand demountables. There were several brands of demountable rim wheels available by 1908-09. The wheels/tires look smaller than the original 28 inch rims (36" tires).

The engine number is one of the latest known to still exist, which may indicate the car was sold in 1908 or even 1909 (at least 42 Model K were sold in Ford Fiscal Year 1909, according to Ford audit information).

It looks like the upper portion of the car was originally red, with traces of red and a black pinstripe still evident under the chipping blue paint. I don't see any red underneath, and my guess is the undercarriage may have been gray. Ford advertised the 1908 Model K in "any color combination desired" and I've come across articles mentioning many colors of Model K.

The belt pulley's are originally V channel. Other differences from other Fords before and after included true dual ignition, although this coilbox has only one switch (should have two, one for the coils, with two battery choices, and one for the original Ford patented Holley Magneto). The original Holley (invented by Ed Huff, patented to Henry Ford) was actually the world's first Capacitive Distributor Ignition (CDI), and that switch had two positions, so the car could be run on mag, or switched to battery, using the distributor on the magneto. Other later Model T style improvements included tapered rear axles, and a wider transmission band, like the 26-27 Improved Ford.

And Henry Ford did not "dislike" the Model K. Obviously, I could go on and on..... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:40 pm:

I like the car as it is, but imagine that whoever buys it will fix it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:42 pm:

Rob,
Please do. . . . .I'd like to know more about your observations of this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 03:53 pm:

Rob, what is your observation of the engine serial number? It looks double stamped. I do not mean to degrade or insult the car, as it is Fantastic. I'm just curious. -Ed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:09 pm:

I had not seen the engine number (didn't go that far). It's interesting that what looks like an original body tag and the number under the engine number is stamped 2446.

Ford made about 1,000 Model K, so I'm at a loss to explain the underlying stamp (2446) and the 2446 on the body tag.

Quite an interesting car. Model K are easy to drive, fast and easy to maintain. I hope whoever the next owner is get's it out on the road.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 04:39 pm:

Rob:

In your note above you mention that the Model K had the first Capacitive Distributor Ignition.

Please correct me if I am mistaken, but I suspect that you intended to refer to the Model K Holley Huff ignition system as the first Capacitive Discharge Ignition as opposed to Capacitive Distributor Ignition.

As for the body tag, I too don't understand the number 2446. My initial reaction is that the tag doesn't belong to the K. Maybe time will tell.

Timothy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 05:18 pm:

Right Tim (CDI), thanks.

It looks like the same number on the body tag is on, however under, the larger heavier 952. Interesting.....

I'd like to know the name of the original owner....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 05:21 pm:

Rob,

The original owner was the Ford Co. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert - Granby ,CT on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 05:59 pm:

Tim are you bidding on it it would make a good stable mate to your other t's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:22 pm:

Spencer:

No, I'm not in the market for a K Roadster.

One Model K is enough for me.

In fact, when I was in the market for my K Touring ....which spanned a number of years.....I had the opportunity to purchase three different K Roadsters. Why Roadsters popped up for sale but not Touring cars is beyond me. And for whatever reason, Roadsters don't have the same appeal for me as the Touring. So each time a Roadster became available I developed weak knees, thinking this may be my last chance at a K, and then the resolve for a Touring returned and I passed each opportunity. Finally a Touring car became available and I snagged it.

Although I don't post much about touring in my K, I can confirm Rob's reports that they are a fine, although maligned, piece of machinery. I have driven my K 8,765 trouble miles in the last seven years.

Timothy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 07:47 pm:

Rob and Tim,

Were either of you aware of this car prior to today?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:42 pm:

I don't live anywhere near Tim K, and have never seen his K in person. But I spot it in so many tour report photos (mostly HCCA, but occasionally others), that I can confirm he drives his K a lot!

I can't speak for Rob or Tim, but 952 is the number I have heard as being the latest known surviving model K.
As for that other number (2446) on the body plate? Again, I am not an expert on model K Fords, but I would think the number plate was changed at some point in the car's past. Models N, R, and SR used the same brass plate, and their numbers went much higher.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 08:51 pm:

Gary

Yes...both Rob and I were aware of K952, as well as its whereabouts prior to its current listing by RMSothebys.

Timothy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 10:31 pm:

A guy has to have pretty long fingers to reach the throttle and spark levers with the wheel that way...

I wonder if the seats were upholstered with foam rubber that has deteriorated over the years? Horsehair would not have gone flat like that.

Aside of being snarky and critical, I'd love to have it in my garage...

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 - 11:39 pm:

How many Model K Fords exist today? Im kjnda curious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 12:55 am:

I have the same question Nova Scotia Rob. Even tho Sothebys says only 10 are left.
Rob H, would you way-in about your opinion of the number of K's still here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 01:16 am:

With out repeating a color, photo's on the net come up with 10
Light blue, dark blue, black, green, white, aqua, maroon, red, grey and brown.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 04:10 am:

Rob has written earlier about 23 surviving Model K's total - but Sotheby writes about surviving *roadsters* and ten of them may well be correct too, since the K series cars were both made as touring cars and roadsters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 06:03 am:

Here's a picture of the odd engine number stamping with an underlying smaller 2446 and K952 above..?

nki

Maybe this one was among the last, built after the bulk of 6-40 production - and some new worker thought it should get a number out of the S series instead?




(Message edited by Roger K on December 07, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 07:13 am:

Ok, time to do a little digging....

I believe there are 8 existing K Roadsters still in existence. There are a total of 23 Model K I'm aware of, a mix of 1906 and 1907-08 tourings, and two "roadsters" that are unique. The two roadster appearing Model K are on 1906 114 inch chassis. One, at Pioneer Village, Minden, Nebraska, is an early chassis, with custom roadster body. The second, is a well done, standard appearing roadster body, on a 1906 114 inch wheelbase chassis.

With about 1,000 made, a survival rate of 2.3 percent is pretty good. I've often heard a 1 percent survival rate for early cars is typical.

Often lost in the haze of history, are some interesting "facts" regarding Ford Motor Co. and the Model K. For FMC Fiscal Year (FY) 1906, the Model K was Ford's leading new car seller, providing 85% of Ford's new car sales net income. That's right, 85%! Ford sold over 300 Model K that year. While this seems like an insignificant number in Model T terms, this placed Ford first in six cylinder car sales, in the world. Again, in FY 1907, with about 500 Model K sold, Ford was the world leader in six cylinder car sales. More than the new 1907 RR Silver Ghost, Napier, Stevens Duryea, National and all other six cylinder car makers (about 25 automakers sold six cylinder cars in model year 1907).

Along with Models N and R, Model K helped Ford achieve their first million dollar profit year in 1907.

Although only a little over 100 Model K were sold for FY 1908 (mostly Roadsters?), the model outpaced 1908 Model N sales in net profit. In other words, the Model K was a better net profit maker than Ford's famous Model N for 1906 and 1908, two of the two models three years of production.

Ford's K Roadster, announced in late January, 1907, was America's first six cylinder sports car. National also introduced a six cylinder roadster shortly after, so which actually pushed one out the door is not known for sure, but Ford announced first.
Now for more research.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephan Walter on Thursday, December 07, 2017 - 11:07 pm:

This appears to be an early 1950s photograph of 952. Note the crisp well stuffed seat trim compared to the current photos...and the wheel conversion to smaller straight sided wheels.


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