Old Photo - Brass Era - Posing With His Ford And Pet Raccoon

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Brass Era - Posing With His Ford And Pet Raccoon
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, December 08, 2017 - 09:49 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, December 08, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

I thought " how long has Steve Jelf owned that T"? Not him, no tape measure in the bibs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Friday, December 08, 2017 - 11:31 pm:

Looks like a cat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Friday, December 08, 2017 - 11:49 pm:

Looks like a '13 updated with electric headlamps and a '15 hood. Definitely a "bitsa" T !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 12:00 am:

I say cat also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 12:28 am:

Not a 15 hood, 13 hoods are longer. 13 hood with loovers cut in it or aftermarket hood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 01:33 am:

Up to 1911 hood was 2" longer, 13/14-15/16 the same at 21-5/8"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 08:31 am:

Definitely a cat. Looks like kitty ruined the shoulder pose and is heading elsewhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 09:12 am:

Dallas,

Go with your first instinct. Steve Jelf in his younger days.

Rolled tape measures hadn’t been invented yet. There’s surely a folding ruler in the outside pocket of the leg up on the running board. Ruler


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 09:35 am:

Jay is correct about the raccoon... The cat owns the car and is with his best friend "George Raccoon" who is helping him out of the drivers seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 11:13 am:

Doesn't the top look a little high?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 11:34 am:

That top sure sits higher than mine - wish the driver and his cat would move out of he way so we could see better !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

Jay -- thank you for another great photo!

Dale and Frank,

Minor comment about the hoods. The 1909-1916 hoods are interchangeable with the exception of the 1911 Torpedo Roadster and Open Runabout which had the hood that was approximately 2 inches longer than the others. There were changes in construction, material, louvers or no louvers etc. But they will fit any other 1909-1916 Ford with the exception of the longer hood 1911 Torpedo Roadster and Open Runabout.

Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1911H.htm where it says:

The 1911 Open Runabout and the Torpedo Runabout were probably the most “racy” Model T Fords ever produced. The seats were moved rearward and lowered by moving the gasoline tank to the rear deck. The hood was made longer by about two inches, and the bottom section of the windshield sloped back, all of which gave the car a longer and lower appearance.

See also Rootlieb's page with the hood measurements at: http://nebula.wsimg.com/b13731bbb9bc381af46848457c2d7826?AccessKeyId=8514493EDB42A0ECA4EC&disposition=0&alloworigin=1 And yes, modern catalogs can be wrong.

From the Feb 1, 1917 USA Price List of Parts:



Note the Ford Price list said 22" long -- and Rootlieb says 21 5/8 " long. Why the
difference? The only time it matters would be if you needed a hood for the Torpedo Roadster or Open Runabout. Below is the price list of parts effective Dec 1, 1911 covering the 1912 and earlier year Model T Fords.



There is always more to learn and discover about the cars. And none of us can remember all of the information -- 15,000,000 plus cars times a lot of parts etc.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 06:14 pm:

Thanks Hap, yes I forgot the word Torpedo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 07:49 pm:

Caution some thread drift....

Frank,

That's minor. When I was cleaning out stuff from my Dad's garage I started finding some rather large 1 1/2 inch or 2 inch diameter threaded pipe, but they were very short pieces. I started tossing them in the scrap metal recycle bin box -- I'll never need a 2 inch long piece of that large diameter pipe. But as I got further down in the box I was digging in, I found a Gordon Smith Air Compressor head that goes on a 1928-1934 Ford four cylinder engine.

The engine runs on #1 & # 4 cylinders and pumps compressed air on #2 & #3 cylinders. After I saw it I remembered purchasing it and putting it in Dad's garage under the 1915 Centerdoor - Ghost. But in the forty years or so that had passed from when I purchased it as a high school student I sort of forgot about that one. The Centerdoor wasn't moved from the time I left home until it was adopted by Bob Kiefaber and that wooden box with the head covered by all the short pieces of pipe needed to hook it up was under the Centerdoor.



Having fun Reminiscing,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 11:39 am:

Converting a car engine to an air compressor was pretty common "back in the day". A side venture to that was to convert a V-8 to a 4, a 6 to a 4, a 4 to a 2 (that one didn't work too well). We did this because of gas rationing, and if I remember right, the V-8 conversion worked rather well. Nobody had any gauges, so it was By Guess and By Gosh if you were inflating a tire.


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