Auto Polo - why don;t they still play this sport.- Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Auto Polo - why don;t they still play this sport.- Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Friday, December 08, 2017 - 11:57 pm:

Found this photo amongst a pile of old prints at a market today.

Don't know if its a common one which has been posted before or not, seller had no idea even as to what was happening in the photo or what the cars were.

auto polo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 04:37 am:

My guess would be the ban on drinking and driving, no one would try that sober


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 05:20 am:

staged, no shutter was fast enough back then to freeze frame a spinning wheel. IMHO lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Pharis on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 10:07 am:

I'm with you Gary, once upon a time I was the guy laying under the overturned T... But I had a completely different expression on my face!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darryl Bobzin on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 10:40 am:

This was during the horse strike of 1928. The owners gave in the horses demands and returned to the field in 1929.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 11:39 am:

Ever since I learned that every picture of auto polo was faked I've wondered if it was really as wild as the pictures show. What do you guys think, is it really that easy to end up upside down in a bare chassis on a small field?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 11:51 am:

The Model T equivalent of "cow tipping" ? (Also known as "shucking the flat-landers")


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 01:53 pm:

Well if they faked the photo's they did a good job with this one! Mallets and men both in the air.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 02:47 pm:



Note, I didn't see it either until someone else previously pointed it out.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 03:12 pm:

Note, I'm not sure how fast the shutter speeds were, but the photo below seems to capture some fast action. It was posted by Jay (thank you Jay for all your great photos!) at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/191887.html?1298166562

It shows when Raymond Mays lost the wheel in a 1924 mountain race at the Shelsley-Walsh Mount Race in Wales. And yes -- he managed to stop the car before it went off the side of the mountain.



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 03:19 pm:

I know nothing about camera's but could action pictures like these be a frame freeze from a film made into a photo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 03:36 pm:

Here's a camera that could do 1/2800 shutter speed in the 1920's. Fast enough to stop a spinning wheel may not have been that uncommon. http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Deckrullo-Nettel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 04:18 pm:

Problem wasn't just shutter speed, but film speed as well. I'll bet Mark Osterman can inform us as to what was possible in the T era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

I love that Raymond Mays photo! Truly, a one in a million capture of a moment in time. And the look on his face is PRICELESS! A very famous photo, and a very interesting person.

I sometimes think that staging pictures of auto polo was a bigger sport than playing auto polo was. I have seen a dozen or more, trying to spot the tricks in the staging is fun in itself. But yes, the game was really played, by either brave or crazy souls from about 1920 to at least as late as 1950. Many years ago, at a silent film showing, several vintage short subjects were also shown. One of them was a 1948 newsreel filming of an auto polo game. The narrator talked about getting back to "normalcy" after WWII, and how these brave souls had resurrected the old game for fun. The entire newsreel short dedicated to auto polo was maybe a minute (less), but they showed actual action and play of the game, including a rollover or two. And yes, in 1948, they were using model Ts for the sport.
While staging still shots was done, some live action shots can also be seen. The clues are usually spinning wheels and flying dust, which the photography of the day did not capture well. If one looks very closely at the staged shots, usually a few tricks (the board Hap points out) can be found. They usually did a pretty good job at hiding the jacks and blocks behind the chassis or people, but often one can be seen. Clearly, often the people spun a wheel, jumped, or threw the ball or mallet just before the shutter was pressed, but if most of the wheels aren't in motion, aren't kicking up a cloud of dust, and dust isn't hanging in the air where the cars would have come from, the shot is likely staged.
In past discussions, a few people shared posters from the era announcing the game to be played at (then) upcoming fairs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

Ok so there is a post holding up the right hand T.What is holding up the left rear wheel of the Left T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 08:03 pm:

I was just doing a little research on early automobiles and ran across the topic of Auto Polo. It seems it was first played in Wichita, Kansas, U.S.A., in the summer of 1912. The sport spread like wildfire. It was invented as a promotional gimmick to sell Ford cars by J.J. Jones, a Ford dealer in Wichita at the time it was invented. As a side note, J.J. Jones went on to make and sell his own automobile, the Jones car. When old Henry found out he was in competition with him, Hank pulled the plug on J.J.'s Ford dealership.
Verne Shirk
Wichita, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 08:51 pm:

You can see the left rear has been doctored by sort of dotting out the post or what ever was used to hold that side up. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 08:58 pm:

Mack, If you look very closely, under that other raised wheel, you can see a cut and paste placing grass over the block the wheel is actually sitting on. A higher definition copy of the picture would show it better. A simple photo trick that has been around for more than 150 years.

The first photo at the top is interesting. The "dust" issue is actually moot, because there is clearly mud on the ground. However, look closely at the man "flying through the air". He is laying on the roll-bar/grab-rail that he is supposed to be inside from in the car. In a real bump and roll, he could not achieve that position having been thrown out of the car. The lack of clarity of the front wheel in the air indicates that he probably gave it a spin before he climbed onto the staged rollover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 09:07 pm:

Been going on since the early days....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Kauper on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 09:14 pm:

There is some stippling in the area of the left wheel on the left car. Shown in red here. Very typical for retouching of the time.Retouched area


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 10:41 pm:

John stolzes of Texas sorry for name spelling has a polo car.
If theres another out there lets play


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, December 09, 2017 - 11:03 pm:

We have a polo car in Wisconsin. Sorry I cannot find a photo. Lots of fun driving it on the ice in the winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 04:17 pm:

Dave is this the car you are thinking of? And is it yours? Looks like you at the wheel.



Posted by Dave at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/320604.html?1352694034

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 05:46 pm:

I don't know who has/had it, but I think there is/was one in the PNW. Oregon or Washington. I read it on the forum a few years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 07:14 pm:

That is the car. No, unfortunately it is not mine. It now belongs to Kevin Esser. I wish you could all see the engine manifolds. Not what you would expect.

That is me at the wheel and I think it is the best photo I have ever seen Dan Zahorik take. He was able to focus on the radiator and the rest of the photo just blends in beautifully. The car made great rooster tails that day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 07:16 pm:

Enjoy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubyQ6bQ0-ok


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 10:46 pm:

Has anyone else noticed the clamshell rear end and small hubs?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 11:27 pm:

Yes, Cameron, and the early frame's rear crossmember.


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