What is the Worst Flat Flat Tire Experience You Have Had

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: What is the Worst Flat Flat Tire Experience You Have Had
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Sebaugh in Jackson, Missouri on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 01:57 pm:

The thread on plugging tires reminded me of this. The worst flat tire experience I have had was when I was following behind a guy hauling old, used roofing shingles on a flatbed trailer. This happened to my truck not my model T. The shingles slid off and before I got stopped, all four of my tires were covered with shingles containing nails. It looked like somebody roofed my tires. All four ties went flat. When I got the truck home it took me 18 plugs to fix my tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JOHN BEVARDOS on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

Tire popped, rolled off the rim.....soiled my shorts........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:16 pm:

Tire on my truck came apart. Changed it and before I got back in truck. I was in the ditch and Wife, truck, trailer were 130 feet down the road. Driver fell asleep and hit us running 70MPH+. That was the high point of the day. It all went down hill from there. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:18 pm:

One particular set of Firestones gave us a lot of trouble one Summer. This was before I started using flaps. We were on a week long drive in Montana and had several flats. The batch of tubes we had did not take patches as well as others did. As we eked along a stretch of bumpy construction a loud familiar bang was heard. We stopped to assess which tube had let go this time. No, not the left side. No, not the right side. Bewildered. I rested my hand on the spare. Yep, it had blown out while mounted on the spare tire rack.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

In GM's infinite wisdom, the base (V6) Pontiac G8's got a spare tire and jack, but the G8 GT's with the V8 and other performance upgrades only have a small air compressor that plugs into the cigarette lighter.

We were at a wedding a month ago, about an hour from home and came out to a flat RF tire. The compressor leaked air faster than it pumped, but we were across the road from a gas station. I decided to carefully drive on the flat to the station, but rolled the tire off the bead.

We called AAA, who sent a rollback truck, but only had enough room for two passengers. We also had to call Grandma for a ride for my wife and 3 kids who were all out way past their bedtime already.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:40 pm:

I can't remember exactly but I had either 5 or 7 flats in one day. All in the city. I didn't get much else done that day but I got very good at changing the tires!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:41 pm:

Hauling an old Galion road grader east on I-80 from Nebraska to Michigan on a Friday night.
A pair of well-used tires on the lowboy trailer blew as I was leaving Iowa, within sight of the bridge over the Mississippi River into Illinois. I couldn't get off the road far enough to change them (deep ditches) and the wall-to-wall semi-truck traffic wouldnt even allow me to open my driver's side door to get out, let alone stand next to the trailer to attempt a change.

To take some weight off of that axle I started up the grader and used the blade to shift the machine as far as I could to the other side of the trailer and drove it as far as I could up the neck (it was the left rears that had shredded).
Then I crawled along the shoulder- gaining speed and spewing mangled rubber- until another driver finally waved me in, just before the bridge! I got across and into the Illinois welcome center/rest stop on the other side, swapped some tires around, re-centered the grader and rolled into the yard 10 hours later, no spares or money left, but only three hours late!

Then there was the time a wheel and hub assembly came off a different trailer going about 50 mph, passed me, went up through the roadside ditch, bounced across an empty church parking lot (good thing it was a weekday morning!) and wedged under their bus......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:43 pm:

On my first Summer Model T tour, I heard something hit up under the front fender hard then pssssssssssssss then a flat tire due to the stem being sheared off. I had a spare on a demountable rim so I swapped it out in 10 minutes. Drove another 30 feet and lost a rear tire. BOTH due to low air pressure.
Steve Tanck came along and changed out the tube with his hands and feet, no tire irons and a local invited me back to his shop to air up to the proper 55 lbs. No trouble the rest of that tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 02:45 pm:

August 27, 2005, wife and I are fleeing hurricane Katrina and have already driven 400 miles at 11:00 at night and a front tire goes flat. Good news is that I have a full size spare and put it on. Have a conversation with the wife on the side of the road that we have another full size spare in New Orleans, probably should have it, but not going back for it. 600 miles later we get to Virginia and replace the tire since the hole is in the side, no repair. Upon inspecting the other three tires in the daylight, I discover that the other front tire has a 16d nail at the edge of the tread but it hasn't gone flat. Went back to the tire shop and replaced it with a tire just like the first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 03:10 pm:

On the Branson tour a couple of years ago I had the left rear come off and pass me up. My friend who was with said we better call the sag wagon. I said not a chance, we are going out in the woods and find our tire and put it back on. Installed it with different tube, hand pumped and away we went.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 03:12 pm:

Actually it was a few months ago. I had inflated the old Wards Riverside tires that were on the '23 when I first bought the car. Brought them up to 55 lbs. Was not yet driving the car .. just assembling it and rolling it back and forth from the garage. The next day I was under the car and one of the rear tires exploded. I couldn't hear from one ear for about an hour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 03:25 pm:

I have been luck for many years regarding flats (knocking on some wood). We camp a lot, and now have a large travel trailer. When we camp with my brother and his family, they always have to caravan (I hate that). My brother is also terrible about maintenance. So, we are leaving the Twin Cities, there following us, changing freeways from I94 East to I 35E north. I35E was under major construction. Brotherís PU shreds a tire right at the interchange. DW gets the text. I get off the first exit and try to find a place I can park and find out whatís going on, and where they are at. They arenít answering. On the way, back we find out they found a place to pull over in the construction area, a bit of shoulder not coned off. I loop around with trailer in tow, through downtown in rush hour traffic to get back to him, and I had to drive through part of downtown to make the turn back to them. Luckily, I have no fear of heavy traffic while I am driving. I pull in behind him. Find out, he bought a new spare that week. He is never prepared, he was trying his Eurovanís lug wrench would work on his PU, nope, no luck. As usual the little brother had all the right tools and equipment to do the job. When all done, they give me grief, as I have safety vests, I know how to make all my marker lights even the ones up high on the TT blink, so we are very visible to traffic. The traffic was good to us.

Afterwards stopped for dinner, he decided to go get two more tires, so everyone is at the restraint and we are off to Fleet Farm. Now we are probably at a 3 hour delay. He and his family then went home, deciding to leave for camp the next morning. Never did change the other extremely old tire. By the time we left the cities it was very late. We rolled into camp at 1 am.

This is what most trips are like when we caravan with him.

The only other bad tire experience was with new Firestones and a long trip out west. Lost 5 tires on that trip, all with budges.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 03:46 pm:

Had the Model A in Big Bend National Park in the middle of the Summer at 116F. Pull over on the side of the road as the steering gets really hard and find two flat tires on the right and I have only one spare. Luckily I had a bicycle patch kit under the seat. Would work for 15 minutes and rest for 10 due to the heat....rinse and repeat. Took three hours to replace one tire and patch the other. Both tires had multiple cactus thorns through the tread. Had to feel on the inside of the tires little by little to find the thorns and then snap them off with pliers. My truck and tow trailer were 35 miles away up in the Basin. No cell phones back then but no big deal. Much of Big Bend still has no cell phone coverage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

At our club's 2002 Christmas Party, the winner of the annual Hard Luck Award went to one of our members for his experience on our overnight tour from St. Louis to Jerseyville IL and back (about 90 miles total). He had 11 flat tires on the two-day tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 04:48 pm:

this is a bit off flats on a model t, but after 25 or so years it still makes me shake my pant leg.im driving a semi loaded with 8500 gal of gas,headed to Lebanon N.H.i'm on Rt 93 in Concord N.H.this is around 130 am, there used to be a rotary that cross.s rt 4, i'm around 49,MPH,om a left curve now i'm tip.d up about 30 degree.s leaning heavy, because for the next eight miles is up is a 4 percent grade,when your weighing 8500 you want to make time.when all h broke loose, 3 of the four tires on the tractor blew,NOW YOU HAVE TO MAKE SOME QUICK MOVES TO KEEP UP RIGHT,only one place to head,to my right is a grass patch that heads down a slight down hill to the parking lot of the HAMPSHIRE house HOTEL,yard with lots of cars,NEVER HIT A ONE,but it was day lite be fore I could get out of there.between getting four new sneakers, they had to wake about 9 mad guests to move the cars to make room for me to get twisted out of there. two days be fore this trip they changed tires from from nylon ten hundred twenty's to ten 22s mishlin 12 ply tread 4 ply side wall, the tire shop should have installed wider spacer's between the larger tires,the result was the side walls rubbed overheating the tires causing the failure.they had to replace sixteen of the eighteen tires the next day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 04:58 pm:

now MY T tire story, MARK, the same thing happen to me,MAN 55 pound of air sounds like a 105 howitzer one foot from your ear,now I know what ringing sounds like.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Anderson on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

Not a T, but my work car, a 2006 Nissan Altima. Going down the road, heard a different noise up front. Left front wheel came off at 55mph and immediately put me in the right ditch and out in a bean field.. Kinda like the Nascar drivers. Wheel ended up beside me. Called a friend, went to his house and got a floor jack. Jacked it up and stole 4 lug nuts off the other 3 wheels and re-installed the wheel. The wheel hadn't been off for 5 months. Not sure why the lug nuts came loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

Had a blowout on the rear tire of a heavy motorcycle doing about 60. Zigzagged across three lanes of the expressway a few times trying to keep the bike upright before coasting to a stop in the median. Oh yeah, it was afternoon rush hour too. I've had others in cars but the motorcycle was the worst. I just threw those shorts away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 06:15 pm:

Not a T, but I had the horrible misjudgement of buying a Sears "Allstate" tire before leaving on a long trip. Very hot weather and the tread separated from the casing on the freeway with less than 100 miles on it. Changed it out for my bald spare, drove back 100 miles to Sears and they offered to pro-rate it. I howled like a Banshee and the manager gave me a new tire.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 06:34 pm:


This was my worst flat tire experience. It happened almost 60 years ago between Baker and Las Vegas. In those days you could get a mounted used tire for a model A from the wrecking yard for about $2 so I took along 3 spare tires. Of course most of the tires had very thin tread because they were all off junk cars. We thought it would make a good picture to get the car next to a Joshua tree, so we went off roading to the biggest one around. Unfortunately, along the way we ran over cactus and got needles throughout the tires. We replaced with spares and also had to stop and buy another. You see cactus ruins the tire. Even if you repair a puncture, the other needles work their way in and you keep getting flats! By the way that was on our honeymoon. A memory forever!:-)
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 06:54 pm:

Thank Mr. Kling, I think that is a fun memory and doesn't count as a worst experience. Best thing I have read today.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 07:23 pm:

The picture under that Joshua Tree was worth the flats !! Great story.

Hm. The thread didn't limit the discussion to flats on Model Ts. I don't know if it was "worst", or even bad at all, but as a kid, when I first got my T running, all the tires I had were probably over 20 years old at the inside, and between the sad condition of the tubes, and the tires themselves, I never expected to go very far without having to fix a flat. Or two. Or three. Or more. I didn't especially find it troublesome at the time - it was kinda fun, in a way, and I got really good with Monkey Grip and a hand-pump. I learned you actually can put patches on patches.

The worst flat tire experience I've had was in a canyon on a fully-loaded six-horse trailer on a 6% grade on a one-lane dirt road where the uphill side didn't leave enough room to walk, and the downhill side was a sheer drop off into the creek-bottom a couple of hundred feet below. Did I mention the mud ? All the rock in the road and alongside sort of shredded the tire, which blew out. Kinda hard to use a bottle-jack in the mud with those ponies jumping around in the trailer. The good news is, we did have a spare !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

I did not have a flat, but I had to fix it! I worked in a mobile home factory right out of high school. Maintainance was what I was hired for. Well more of a helper. In the plant I might add. I was sent with a road repair man to fix a flat tire on a four axle mobilly home. We arrived to a real mess. The 12 ft wide trailer was on a curve on state road 9. Now state roads in Northern Indiana have no shoulder. Maybe a couple feet and straight to the ditch. The trailer had a flat tire and then another and ended up loosing all four wheels on the right side. The driver got off the road as far as possible. About 6ft of the trailer was over the white line. All four axles were buried in the dirt on the right side. Hubs were well below ground level. The center of the axles were on the crown where the ditch started. The bottom of the siding was setting on the ground in the ditch. We had to go under from the left side or traffic side. On our belly picking and digging gravel to get jacks in place and then the real fun began. Jacking and blocking as we went. Once it came up a bit, the traffic became the problem. Everytime a semi went past us at 55 mph the trailer would rock back and forth on the jacks. We got hubs about ground level and had enough room to enter from ditch side to dig a spot for the tires to go back on. Laying there on our belly digging best we could and a semi goes by and the siding would touch our back as the trailer rocked from the burst of wind. We ended up changing one axle before it went back to the factory for repair on alot of damage. We found 2 of the four missing wheels. Back then there was no fear. Now I would need clean shorts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Eyre on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 08:26 pm:

We got caught with a set of early t drivers on a 14 Canadian touring on a MTFCI Lexington Kentucky tour and we were running the pressure at about 65 pounds and we had 14 flat tires. I remember changing a tube on the left front as the right rear was going flat. Went over to Lang's trailer as asked to buy some tubes and Don said how many do you want? And I just answered how many do you have? On Friday I called Universal tire and they said run the pressure up to 85 pounds and they stood behind them and replaced all of them when we returned home. I think me and my friend Tony had clincher tire change down to about 7 minutes by then end of the week. At one point during the week I was done ready to throw in the towel and drive the show car we had brought to show only for the rest of the week. I'm glad I stuck it out and it's a memory that the Eyre family will never forget.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 09:27 pm:

Not a T but in 1967 I bought and mounted 6 brand new still in the wrapper 30 year old Goodyear Diamond Tread tires for my 1930 Plymouth and headed off to Hershey for the fall meet. I got as far as the middle of the Goethals Bridge from Staten Island to New Jersey when a side wall blew out. Over the objection of the Bridge and Tunnel Authority I changed the tire on the bridge. I got to the bottom of the bridge when the sidewall of the second tire blew out. I changed the second spare and headed right to Sears. In 1967 Sears still carried 4.75-5.00X19 tires and while I was buying 6 new Allstate Safety Tread tires the third sidewall blew out. The cord had obviously rotted in the tires despite the fact that they had never been out of the wrapper. I still have those Sears tires on the car today and they barely show any wear!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 09:46 pm:

My two worst were both on the same trip to Bartlesville in September. The first was on the way over. The right front went flat out in the sticks. All I had was standard Ford irons. With a two-hour struggle I got the tire off the rim, but here was no way to get it back on. I had to phone a tow service, and with proper tools two of us remounted he tire. The second was a blowout on the way home, one of those deals where you hear a bang and see a tire roll past you and into the ditch. I phoned my cousin and she came and fetched me. In the ,morning we went back with another wheel and I drove the car home.


I don't recommend NOS tires.


The country roads eat 'em up like cheese.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 10:42 pm:

My story is kind of typical, I guess. I went six or seven years without a problem, but this year, picked up a roofing nail with my right-rear tire. -I wasn't going very fast, as I'd just rounded a residential corner going uphill at maybe 9 mph, so there was no real danger, but the tire let go with a raspy exhale, immediately dismounted and wrapped itself and the inner-tube around the rear axle. -The air-valve, which was held to the rim with a nut, ripped out of the tube, of course. -The car abruptly tilted nose-up and to the right and the throbbing rumble made what had happened immediately obvious. -Of course, I pulled right over to the curb.

Well, my car is a '15 with non-demountable rims and two different size tires, so it wasn't going to be moving under its own power anytime soon. -I whipped out my period-correct cellphone and called Hagerty. -Within forty-five minutes, a flat-bed truck arrived with velvet-covered chains and straps (Seems Hagerty only sends tow operators who have a lot of experience with collector cars).

The most obvious lesson I learned from this and other people's experience (particularly that of Steve Jelf) is that in the event of a flat, the tire may feel an urgent need to part company with the rim, which means a high-speed blow-out could be a very bad thing, indeed. -For those who like to whoosh along at 40 mph and above, I would therefore respectfully suggest maybe slowing it down a little bit. -Like the fang and claw-bearing partners in a lion-tamer's act, these adorable little cars of ours behave themselves right up until they don't. -The best defense is caution, uninterrupted vigilance and an attitude of profound skepticism. -The person who said, "Love is based on trust," never had kids.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 12:58 am:

Steve, your flat reminded me of one I had. In about 1954, I was on my way to San Antonio (Lackland AFB) from Wausau, Wisconsin, in my used 1941 Plymouth Coupe. Someplace in N Texas my right rear suddenly went flat. Seems I wore the tire through the tread, all 4 plies and the inner tube. Money was scarce so I drove on my not so good spare for a long time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 09:40 am:

2 miles down an untraveled Private dirt road, 4 miles to the mooring of the houseboat my first wife and I were loaned for our Honeymoon 2 flat tires on my old pick-up, then it started to rain!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 10:14 am:

The 1975 chevy van we bought new from the chevy plant was getting old/rusty/and very high millage.I went to a auction sale about 37 miles from home and i bought a full 20' of heavy 15" channel iron. About two miles into my trip home the right rear blew out.No spare i kept going and when i got home it was on a ruined rim.Parked in the mud in a thaw later the van had froze in.The 100 hp farm tractor removed the van but it never drove well after that!! I would think that many who haul with a single axle trailer could top any of this?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 10:32 am:

Not the worst, but would like to share my most memorable flat tire event which took place at the Lawrence Kansas car show many moons ago. I was admiring the patina of an early 20's Dodge coupe which looked as though it had been hauled out of a shed that morning, a real barn find. It had Non Skid tires on it which fascinated me (I had not seen one of these in person before this) and while the owner was explaining some features of the starter-generator system a very distinct hissing began. We looked around trying to locate the source of the noise and as the car slowly descended we effectively located it. Right before our eyes the left front tire was giving up the ghost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 10:48 am:

Wow, I've been lucky compared to some of you guys. Worst I got is that I've never had to change a tire in pleasant weather. Rain, sleet, bitter cold, dark for sure, but never when it's nice out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 11:16 am:

We were on our way to the CO/WY tour in 2009 first day it started raining hard so we stopped in O'Fallon,IL for the night i was looking out the window when I started seeing roofing coming off the motel in big sheets then the rain gutters just peeled off a small Tornado. the rain continued so we headed out on I-70 west, just outside Topeka Ks. I felt the trailer sag and looked in the mirror there were flaming pieces of tire coming out from under the fender, keep in mind it was still pouring rain, so I just said it has to be done so out in the blinding rain, laid down in a river on the edge of the interstate with a bottle jack and jacked the trailer axle up removed the wheel with some remnants of tire stuck to it, I went to remove the spare from its bracket and the welded bolt broke off so here I am sitting in a river with a socket and some channel locks taking the bolt off the spare, this was in early June so it was also cold, I got the spare on and we went as far as Topeka for the night and got a new tire, the rest of the trip was uneventful except for the cold rain.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 11:37 am:

I guess I have been very lucky with just a few flat in the VW and in my various Ts until we were driving to New Mexico last year.
We were in the Chevy truck towing the 14 when on I-40 we had a front tire blow out at speed. The noise was shattering, first the bang and then the rim on the road. Of course the steering was weird though I managed to stay on the pavement. The vibration was so great that the diesel pump lost its prime so the engine stopped.
It was my worst driving experience in 60 years a driving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis R on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 12:07 pm:

Learned the hard way- Do not put your leg up against a tire you're inflating. Especially an old tractor tire. I think I set a world record for the biggest welt ever. Took a week for my ears to stop ringing too...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

......while driving down a country road the car began to shake really bad. I pulled onto a farmers field, looked at my wife, she looked at me like what was that and then I saw behind her the right rear rubber tire rolling our front. She had to jump out of the 14 touring to get the tire before it caused an accident.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 01:56 pm:

So many flats, so many stories, I don't know where to start. As a youngster, we had flats or blowouts every time we moved a car. Being the Kid, I had to change the tire, if we had a spare (seldom), or fix it in place. This always required pumping up the tire with the old time hand pump. The Model T's were bad about rolling the tire off the rim when getting in and out of a rut on the dirt roads, happened all the time. We put patches on patches, and kept driving. During the War, relatives from Louisiana came to visit, came time to go home, they didn't have a spare, and no way to patch the old tube. We stuffed the casing full of Johnson Grass, and they made it back home. On this Forum is discussion pro and con about plugs, I have used them always, and some good tales, some bad, but in a pinch, they work. Used them almost daily when farming on tractor tires. Worst/best plugging experience was between Dallas and Houston in the '60's, I would plug one, drive a while, plug one, drive awhile, I know I plugged tires at least 15/20 times, but I was flat broke and no spare. The big truck tires with rim rings, I had a Cousin almost killed airing one up, and a fellow worker killed by one. Had one of them blow up in my face, thought I was a goner, took an eye out of it's socket. Lost a right side trailer tire one night with a load of oilfield casing, when the trailer took to the dirt shoulder, it shut me down instantly and the load of pipe came ahead and crushed the truck cab with me in it. Flats are not good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 03:11 pm:

Years ago I got to go on a Model T tour of Scotland, and rode with a guy in his 1914 roadster. On the last day, we were driving down a long mountain road with a steep drop-off on the right side and no guard rails. I was hoping the brakes would be ok--they were Rocky Mountains but it was raining. We made it down ok and the old guy let me drive for a bit. We were driving thru a village and coming to a stop- when the right rear wheel came off, rolled down the street and stopped against a brick wall! It was then I decided God must have greater things in store for me, for if that wheel had come off on the hill I probably would not be here today. We had fixed a flat on that wheel the night before. It was a wire wheel with the one big hub nut to hold it on, and I'm sure that had something to do with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 04:04 pm:

Had a tire blow on my 1911 just as it hit 50#s. Changed two for a guy in Montana he bought into the shop to install 2 new ones. 1 had a twisted up towel in it and the other was full of hay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Thompson, Sudbury MA on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 04:13 pm:

Driving my 24tudor sedan on windy road in Carlisle MA, left front tire blew, broke most of the spokes, car tipped over to the left went up a small embankment and righted itself. Had to have car brought home on a flat bed tow truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 04:53 pm:

I was 30 miles form home on my bike (59 Harley). Came to red light. When it turned green, I pulled off and somehow, the rear tire had gone flat while I was sitting at the light. This was the days before cell phones. Had to walk 1/2 mile to find a phone. Called a friend who ran a store about 10 miles down the road. He had some Fix-a-Flat on the shelf and the label said it worked on tube or tubeless. Man, what luck! He closed the store for a few minutes, got on his bike and brought me the fix a flat. I figured if I could at least get it to his place, I'd be OK. I could call for a ride and worry with fixing it later. At least it would be a safe place to leave the bike. So I filled the tire with Fix-a-Flat. Instructions say to drive it immediately to get it swirled around in there and such. So off I went with my buddy following behind. 5 miles later, it suddenly went flat again. Or at least I didn't notice it, until all of sudden, the rim is riding on the flat tire. The tire is off to one side of the bike, so I'm crabbing along sideways, handle bars turned to the side almost like drifting a corner. OK, I got this. No biggy. Just ride it out. Until...the tire swaps sides of the rim. the rear end of the bike immediately crabs to the other side. I have to correct the direction of my steering. Of course, I had about had a heart attack twice now. But it wasn't over. It swapped sides at least once more before I got it to a stop. Scared the CRAP out of me! But I kept it between the ditches. To add insult to injury, I now had to ride B!^{# on the back of his bike back to the store and call someone to come get me and the bike.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, December 15, 2017 - 07:47 pm:

Hal that is not a good feeling. Been there. Riding with some buddys at the end of a long day ride. Our wives were with us. My buddy with the sidecar was in the lead. It was dark and we were all tired and about 30 miles from home when BANG! His rear tire blew at 60mph. It shot him across to the left side in the gravel before he got it whoe'd up. A huge flash went with the bang. I was right behind him. Long story short we all made it home safe and changed our shorts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 09:26 pm:

On my 27 Henderson Deluxe cruising along at 50 mph on a gentle turn, running clinchers. Boom - suddenly I am side ways and sliding on my back rim, add to that a half ton pickup behind me is hard on the brakes. Trying to not run me over, think it scared her more than me. When I came to a stop,I had to just sit there a bit - get my nerve back. The tire was all tied up in the spokes and chain guard. Tore the chain guard lose and damaged it and several of the spokes. I could not even move the bike, had to have a couple guys help me carry it off the road. Had to cut the tire in pieces to git it off and out. All my clincher tires for my motorcycles are now up on the shelf, I run drop centers on all my bikes now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clyde Gibson on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 11:04 pm:

Several years ago I pulled into the sand plant west of Kansas City to load sand. I noticed 2 other semi's setting . So I asked them what was wrong and they said some had dumped a box of nails at the gate. Guess what I was there 2 days fixing 14 tires on my 18 wheeler. I had to buy 12 new tires. My partner brought brought our air compressor from Springfield, Mo. And tools to get me going. Cost a lot of money to repair not counting 2 days of work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 11:54 pm:

My worst experience is buying these worthless tubes they now sell. They must be selling more than ever, so why did they quit making them here in the USA?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clyde Gibson on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 09:08 am:

I put 4 new tires on my 1926 For-for Sedan with new tubes. Have already replaced 3 tubes because of valve stem coming unglued. Just junk tubes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Bocchi on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:22 pm:

It was 1965. I was headed to a formal high school dance with another couple. The 21 touring was across the front of the garage with a 1963 avanti parked up to the rear wheel. In he other side of the garage was the 1964 falcon futura parked against the front fender of the T. This was the car for the dance. With 15 minutes till pick up of my date we piled into the falcon. Backing out was difficult ,feeling as if the emergency brake was on. No such luck. Flat rear tire. Doing my best pit stop tire change in a tux still ate up all the time to pick up the date. Making a critical mistake at the beginning of the tire change. I failed to call the young lady to explain time management change. Arriving 45 minutes late , my date felt stood-up and from there things went as flat as the tire.


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