My bike is older than my model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: My bike is older than my model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 09:01 pm:


Not really. The bicycle is a new reproduction from Rideable Replicas in California and the car is a 1921. I recently mentioned wanting to build a carrier for the back of the car to haul the bike. This is that bike. To be period correct/matching the bike should be a wood-rimmed, regular looking, same size front and rear wheel, model but I like Penny-Farthings. It will be tough to haul the bike with the Touring top down, but I think I will like the car better with the top up. Maybe by spring, when I should be physically able to ride the bike, I can have the carrier built.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 09:08 pm:

Thats cool Tommy. Not sure I would be brave enough to climb or jump on that thing. Thats a long way down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 09:33 pm:

That's sure not a bike for those with osteoporosis. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

That's sure not a bike for those with osteoporosis. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 10:10 pm:

Nice penny farthing! I had a reproduction Rudge on order but the company went belly up long before mine got built (luckily there was no deposit to lose).

Have you figured out how you're going to carry that on your T? I'm picturing something akin to a huge spare tire carrier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 10:32 pm:

I want to attach something to the car with absolutely no modification to the car. NO DRILLING AND NO WELDING. I'm thinking something that attaches using the rear spring u-bolts like trailer hitches might.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernie Williams on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 10:33 pm:

Hey, I just bought the same bike recently, just learned to ride it a few weeks ago... at 64. Did 10 miles on it my last trip (before the weather got cold here). For those that may not know, to get on the bike you push it to get it going, then step on a step protruding from the frame and just climb up on it. To get off you do the reverse, though the first couple times you reach back and try to find the step it is a bit scary. Other than that it is similar to riding a safety bike, except this bike has no brakes and you can never stop pedaling ...or crash, you can guess how I know. Tom, if you have not been on the bike yet, make sure you tighten every bolt each time you ride it for the first few rides.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 11:46 pm:

Now LOOK, Buddy! You already broke ONE hip! What'er you trying to do? :-)

Seriously, I am envious. Always wanted one of those, never had one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 02:53 am:

Breaking hips is not the problem with ordinaries (that bike is an “ordinary”), arms, shoulders, necks and skulls are much more at risk. My ordinary was an 1885 Rudge... beautiful bike!

I ended up selling it due to those risks.

The “replicas” use ball bearing head joints like a modern bike. The correct steel points on the backbone fitted into the fork is way cool and never gave me a bit of problem. The correct attachment not only looks cool but is easily seen yards away giving away its authenticity.

Making a header (flying over the handlebars when your wheel hits an obstruction and driving your skull into the ground from 7 or 8 feet high is just as bad from upon an antique bike as from a modern reproduction ... so please be careful!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 03:39 am:

Tommy,

I meet all kind of folks delivering Model T’s .....

Give Craig at Bench Mark Works LLC a call on Monday or sometime during normal business hours @ 662-465-6444.

He is in Sturgis, MS & does antique BMW motorcycle restorations for folks all over the world.

I delivered a Touring T earlier this year he bought in California from this gentleman in Camarillo, CA after Bakersfield Swap



Craig built a period luggage rack for the rear of the T - he did some other tinkering as well - really interesting guy ....

If you or any other member ever gets to Sturgis, MS - he has an impressive early BMW motorcycle museum open to the public.

FJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Dizer on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 04:17 am:

Tommy, if you can find an old 1 5/16" receiver type hitch, make the two straps that would fit over the spring mount u-bolts and the weld the receiver to them to give you a not too noticeable hitch. Then use a coupler to attach a rack to. I make a simple rack from a length of angle iron with the "v" pointing up for the wheels to ride in, and then using a short piece of pipe that is large enough to have about an inch pipe fit inside it, weld the short pipe so it will be vertical, slightly behind the angle iron. This lets you put a long enough vertical pipe in the socket to give you a support and tie point for the bike. You just pull the pin and slide the rack out to get it out of the way when not hauling the bike, and the removable vertical pipe helps with making it easy to store. I have five original high wheels. I am also the current state Captain for the state of Indiana Wheelmen group. Visit www.thewheelmen.org for more information if interested! It's a good group, similar to the T groups. We have meets all over, and rode a lot!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 07:33 am:

Tommy,

It may or may not fit, but from just looking at the photo, can is sit with the big wheel on running board or maybe a little up on where the front fender meets the running board and the little wheel on the rear fender? If you have a tool box on the left side you may have to move it some or if it is really in the way it might have to be removed. But that would still give you both doors on the right side of the car. You could use the body iron on the front seat that the top attaches to, to provide a place to temporarily clamp a support so the bike doesn't move side to side or front to back. If you clamp to the bracket rather than using the hole where the top fits then you could still put the top up for shade or if it rained. That way you can have the top up or down and the bike can still be carried. And of course something between the bike and the paint on the car where it might touch.

Years ago I looked into purchasing a Penny-Farthing or High Wheeler. At that time the safety issue was not a concern (hey -- I was still bullet proof back then). Now my general rule of thumb is, I no longer climb ladders to cut down tree limbs or other things up high that I used to routinely do myself. Instead I hire someone. Why?

A friend of mine fell from a ladder (he was only about 6 or 8 feet up while trimming a tree. It took about 2 months in and out of the hospital and now one of his shoes has a 1 inch thicker sole than the other shoe.

The Model T has some known safety issues (don't hand crank it with the spark fully advanced, don't drive with the original babbit thrust washers, don't install the spring perches wrong etc.). In a similar way there are some known safety issues with the Penny-Farthings. Some were mentioned above -- doing a "header" etc. Recommend you find a club or experienced rider and discuss what some of those safety issues are and how to reduce the chances of them "biting you." For example a bike helmet while your ride or especially while you learn. The local bike club her uses their bike helmets even when riding their safety bikes.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 09:39 am:

Miss Daisy is my 1930s Hercules single-speed women's bike with rod brakes. It's too long to fit in the bed of Betsy, unfortunately.


pic

pic1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charlie haeckel on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 09:44 am:

I often haul my friends bike, carefully as it is worth more than my T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 09:51 am:

On the running board......why not :-) Looks really cool there too


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 09:53 am:

Terry is correct, the falls can hurt a bit....
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H4VjWlFmOa4


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 10:06 am:

If that car came from Camarillo, California, that has to be Gary London in the trailer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas M. Edfors on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 10:34 am:

I agree with Bill Dizer, go to The Wheelmen website and see what the joys of collecting, restoring and riding high wheel bikes is all about. I am the State Captain for the Wisconsin Wheelmen and have been a member of the Wheelmen since 1971. I too have a number of original bikes and have ridden them all over the United States as well as England and Europe. Great fun (like Model T's of course) but one has to be mindful of the bike's characteristics. There are other reproductions available too. If you are interested in knowing more about these bikes and/or The Wheelmen contact me. Oh, the youtube of the man taking a header, it appears his tire came off which is not very typical. Speaking of hips, I just had (this year) both of my hips replaced but still plan on getting on one of my bikes next year and riding again. It's like T's and other antique cars, once you hooked your hooked for life!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 04:15 pm:

I had started to build a penny farthing before my accident, back in July. Since I now have a penny farthing, I'm thinking of building a replica of an earlier version of the bicycle.


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