Installing new bands

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Installing new bands
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:20 pm:

Good day people of the forum over the years I have seen pictures and read about installing new band material. They seen to start at one end and rivet to the other and cut off the excess, My father always soaked the bands in oil when riveted both ends and then worked the rest of the lining til flat and then riveted the rest of the band. which is the correct way of installing new linings. Thanks In advance Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:25 pm:

I test fit the length first (should be 23 & 1/2" long) and then I've always "humped up the middle" with a 1/4" to 3/8" overhang off each end, rivet both ends then work the band back towards the hump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:33 pm:

Thanks Steve I needed to confirm what I was doing, since Dad pasted I wander if I have retained enough of his teachings, I have always had dad to show the way. All the old time t guy here are gone now. Cheers Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

I was taught to start riveting from both ends to the middle. You will end up with a hump of band in the middle that needs to be pressed flat and the final rivet installed. This may take quite a bit of manuvering including using a C clamp. Make sure the bands are round before you start the process. I install mine dry into the transmission, pour liberal oil over the bands during a coordinated oil change, button everything up and run the engine for 15 minutes without touching the pedals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:42 pm:

I rivet both ends, then work the material down, then finish riveting. I'd hate to have to work all that material between the last two rivets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:50 pm:

When installing new bands whether Kevlar or new Old stock cotton you might find at swap meets make sure they are long enough. Ideal length is 24".
If they are a full 24" you can leave a 1/4" overlap, star riveting evenly from both ends pressing the hump flat to the middle.

Some of the after market older cotton bands were cut to short from the factory sometimes being 23" or less.
it's always best to check the length first before buying them at swap meets as that's usually why they are for sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 04:55 pm:

First, work the metal bands round, the ears approx. 3"-4" apart. The 23" linings need the band round in that size.

Then overhang the lining a tad on the ends, to prevent the metal end of the band and ear from contacting the drums, and rivet the ends of the lining first.

The center will hump up, but the fabric can be pushed down to complete.

Place re-lined bands either oil soaked after riveting, or, better for a less messy job of inserting the bands, just pour 2-3 quarts into the inspection cover on the hogshead to 'pre-lube' after the re-lined bands are installed.

The splash oiling system will soak them fast :-)








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 05:09 pm:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGp2qw_kiwU&index=8&list=PLYG_lIhIwKyJBkYDfseU3J nQLF93FwY4j


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 10:21 pm:


This shows the new lining in place with the overlap on the ends that Dan mentioned. I hold it in place with gorilla tape until the two end rivets are in, then work the hump flat and install the other rivets.


You can use a piece of square bar stock to make a rivet spreader.


Make it tall enough to stand above the band where you can reach it easily with a hammer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 08:27 am:

I tried using a rivet spreader that I bought from Langs. All it did was frustrate me and do an incomplete/sloppy job.

So I switched to a small ball peen hammer and it worked brilliantly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 09:18 am:

I agree with Don, don't bother buying the pliers-like rivet spreader from the vendors. I used one once and gave up on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 10:11 am:

A small ballpein hammer works well for me. As long as the rivet gets spread evenly and in the right direction is the goal. I guess it's all in the aim when using a small ballpeen hammer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 10:20 am:

Aiming is easy. Set the ball on the rivet and hit the hammer with another hammer. It's the same when you adapt a nickel for a casting plug. Don't swing the hammer at it. Set the ball on the nickel and press it down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 11:06 am:

Wear eye protection when smacking one hardened steel hammer with another hardened steel hammer, there's always a (small) chance that a metal splinter will fly back at you.

Also, best to use a brass, lead, or other soft hammer to smack the ball peen hammer to reduce the chance of metal splinters in the first place. :-)


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