Alternative "paint" for a t? linseed oil and lamp black

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Alternative "paint" for a t? linseed oil and lamp black
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 10:23 pm:

Our T friend Bernie Glass in Saskatchewan used linseed oil and lamp black to "paint" his '13 Case skid engine some time ago.
A steam engine with no wheels and gearing. It's built to set in one place then skidded to it's next job.
I think it looks really good and I really like the several (or a hundred) years old look of the factory paint.

skid engine

Have you guys ever heard of anything like this?
Do you think it would look good for the T people that like the "older" look that don't already have it?
Sure, it could be painted with flat/matte/semi gloss black but this method would be another old school type of way to color a T.
Unless I remove all traces of primer on my PsychOdelic 18, I think I'm stuck painting it but hmmm, the 24?

If you've used lamp black or carbon black as a colorant on another project, where did you find it and did it work OK?
There's a few of you out here that use linseed oil and mineral spirits (2 to 1) to preserve your machinery...
I haven't crossed that bridge yet and need to.

Is linseed oil OK to use if the machine isn't stored inside?
I recall some notions that linseed oil may not be UV resistant.
Opinions?
Thanks much! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 10:39 pm:

Where to start ? Yes, you can make a usable paint from linseed oil and a pigment. Specifically, if you use lamp black (soot) the paint will require the addition of a drying agent to perform adequately.

Where to obtain pigments ? Look on the internet for dry pigments, Kremer is one supplier.

There are good reasons why paint chemistry for utility purposes in exterior applications has advanced by leaps and bounds the past 100 years. An item left to the weather coated with a simple paint made with linseed oil and lamp black will probably require re-painting annually. The fact that linseed oil films decay rapidly in UV is not a "notion", it's a fact. Think of paint as being rather like an asphalt pavement. The vehicle (linseed oil) binds pigment particles the way tar binds the gravel. The more reflective the pigment stuff, the more durable the paint. "Chalking" of old paint surfaces shows the failure of the vehicle binders have released free particles of pigment.

Not saying you can't do this, frankly, I like the idea, and besides the fact that steam engines of any kind knock my sox off, I think your friend's skid engine looks great !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 - 10:47 pm:

My dad is maintaining one of his T's just like this. It's an old, kind of sorry car that has been neglected in the past and had a good deal of very fine surface rust in places, and very thin paint in others. His car is now a pretty good 20-footer, and he indeed has to update the finish about once a year.

For whatever reason, he gets a big kick out of renewing it and ends up covered from head to toe in "black". I think he's reliving some portion of his childhood previously denied by his mother!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 06:19 am:

Rich, very good and spot on info, there is a serious safety warning that must be given with the use of linseed oil though : always make sure that any rags with linseed oil on them be laid out preferably outside to dry, NEVER wad them up and throw them in a heap or in the bin, it can self combust and burn your garage down !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 07:53 am:

If you were painting a boiler, you could always just throw your linseed oil rags into the firebox.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 08:10 am:

Shhhh....you are giving away Mr Ditzler original secrets...lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson_graham nc on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 08:16 am:

there is some stuff called williams stove polish
that you can get at the hardware store it goes on like shoe polish philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 08:23 am:

I frequently use Boiled Linseed Oil and a mixture of rustoleum paint. On wood surfaces it requires annual renewal to maintain protection but once it dries on metal (non-porous) surfaces it is durable and only needs maintenance if it becomes scratched it can be used directly on rusted surfaces with very little prep and will protect them. If you like a "Washed look" to the pigment I use 1/4 rustoleum to 3/4 BLO but experiment to find what you like. My wife always has me put my linseed oil rags in a "Homer bucket" filled with water and Dawn (makes the shop rags easier to clean when I am done with them!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bernie glass on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 10:02 am:

hi thanks duey I painted that case seven years ago I takes awhile to dry but now I can once a year sprary with wd40 and wipe of I don,t know what I am doing but looks ok and its inside.i will try a model t when it is summer time bernie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bernie glass on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

hi 1 thing I should mention I did a lot of rubbing with a rag an hour or two after putting it on and even a few days after even the first time I used a rag it just got better as I want now it is easy to clean with wd40 and a rag when the first time I got the case I used a wire brush on it so I spent a lot of time but very little money bernie


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