OT- Photo: Dawson City to Whitehorse, 105 years ago this month

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT- Photo: Dawson City to Whitehorse, 105 years ago this month
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 06:47 pm:



George Black completed the first automobile trip between Dawson City and Whitehorse in December of 1912. It took three days. The automobile wasn’t yet ready for the Yukon roads; the return trip took a week, and Black had to complete the final leg of the journey in a horse-drawn sled. (The Firth Family collection)

Taken from the Dec 14 issue of the Yukon News; read the article here:
https://www.yukon-news.com/opinion/hard-travel-over-the-yukons-winter-trails/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 07:12 pm:

WOW! love those rope standin chain's and the locomotive head light.those guys had cahooner's big as basket balls.left fenders looks as tho it did battle with something hard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 07:33 pm:

Interesting story, however what happened to the car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 07:45 pm:

Much like the Thomas Flyer photos it shows the adventurers in the Locomobile. What a great photo.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 08:32 pm:

Does anyone know how they powered that locomotive light. I guess it was paraffin oil but don’t know for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Saturday, December 23, 2017 - 10:47 pm:

there is a tank with a burner and wick, just like a giant side lamp- unless they plumbed it to burn acetylene like their headlights.

1909-10 Locomobile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 12:51 am:

The big light makes sense when you consider that today sunrise there was about 10:00 am and sunset is about 3:40 pm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 09:47 am:

How many tubes are in those tires?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 09:52 am:

How many tubes are in those tires?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 10:33 am:

Jim,i'm far from a expert but i think what you see as valve stems might be tire bead locks?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 06:11 pm:

>> The big light makes sense when you consider that today sunrise there was about 10:00 am and sunset is about 3:40 pm <<

And if you're shadowed in the valleys, you might get that much daylight, but much less direct sunshine! Here's a photo I took from our cabin in Grizzly Valley, Yukon at NOON on the winter solstice; notice how long the shadows are and how refracted the sunlight is by the ice crystals in the air.



I'm not sure how they'd power that locomotive headlight on the Locomobile...I'm pretty sure railroad locomotives had been equipped with the little steam turbine spun dynamos since the 1890s and used carbon arc electric headlights, but maybe this one had a kerosene burner. Although even today the Yukon has cold snaps with daytime highs -40*F and nighttime lows -60*F for extended periods; and K-1 freezes at around -40. The guys at the tank farm in Whitehorse where we bought Arctic Diesel in the winter said their fuel was 99% kero and 1% naptha, and with that we never had cold weather fuel problems


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 08:10 pm:

Interesting reminder of the flip side of the "land of the midnight sun" . . . we get about nine hours of full daylight here in the sunny south around the winter solstice, and the sun is low enough on the horizon it seems like late afternoon even in the morning. Nothing as dramatic as the far north !!

I think that locomotive headlight is quite old, from the looks of the top of it, probably lit with kerosene ? The car appears to have a prestolite tank. By the way, what make of car ??

Probably faster than mushing it with a dog team, but maybe less dependable !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

Jim E and Ken W DL, Yes, that early style tire and tube was one of several silly ways tried to make tires both easier to change, and be able to stay on the wheels. At the time that car (Locomobile someone said?) was built, that particular idea was just about on its way out.
If you look carefully at the photo, left front wheel (center of picture), at the very bottom is the one and only actual valve stem, held in place by a heavy wing nut. The other five every-other-spoke-space stem-like items are bolts that hold the tire and tube combination onto the wheel.
You can find these quite often in photos taken between about 1906 and 1910.
In full disclosure, I have never had the opportunity to actually work on one of these in person. So I am not quite sure how it all goes together. I have seen photographs and read articles about them, but that is not quite the same as actually handling one. I am not sure if many such actual setups still exist in workable condition. I have heard of a couple in museums or private collections. Mostly, cars that had them originally, have had the wheels altered to use the more familiar tire and tube, either clincher or straight-side high pressure. I have seen some of the original wheels at good brass era swap meets, but never complete. If I recall correctly (some days I am not too sure about that?), that style of wheel (in a smaller size) was available as an option on some model NRS Fords.
Just another of those fascinating tidbits of history I love so much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Monday, December 25, 2017 - 08:11 pm:

There was a fellow named Robert Sheidon that used T's for passenger service from Chitina to Fairbanks and other areas quite successfully. The Fords out performed heavier cars and were much easier to maintain and extract from bogs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, December 25, 2017 - 08:44 pm:

The tank down by the splash apron would be a really unusual “Prestolite” tank, as it has a connection/filler on the top side. As well the proportions don’t look right


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, December 25, 2017 - 08:48 pm:

I wonder if they left from Diamond Tooth Gertys??


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